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Old 04-05-2011, 03:26 PM
 
1,167 posts, read 1,733,800 times
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I've been considering LASIK as I want to go into law enforcement, or maybe even prk, but I'm high hesitant.

My optometrist told me that the likely hood of me having the quality of vision I have when I wear glasses after LASIK is slim to nil. He said while I'm not a terrible candidate, I'm not perfect either.

He said nationally 80% of people get 20/20'vision, with 95% getting 20/40 or better. I need 20/20. So I would have a 1 in 5 chance of still needing corrective lenses even under the best of conditions.

But that's just visual acuity. Not chronic dry eye, inability to drive at night due to halos, glare, ghosting which are very common and are not able to be fixed easily. I could get another surgery but I'd rush losing the 20/20 vision so that my night vision works well enough that I can work.

None of this is guaranteed, but it seems risky. Maybe if I wanted to work in an office, course I've read people who can't do that because the glare from the computer causes that to be difficult.

I don't mean to be totally negative, but the Laser eye surgery industry doesn't seem open about the risk. No one said only 4 out of 5 get 20/20. Or that they don't consider double vision a complication, only a symptom, according tongue FDA, donor doesn't get nearly as much attention.

So hat say you, am I overreacting tonthe horror stories, or are there valid reasons to just stick with glasses and contacts. I'm just worried because I can't undo surgery.
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:32 PM
 
8,936 posts, read 15,860,546 times
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sounds like you've already made your decision
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:43 PM
 
1,167 posts, read 1,733,800 times
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True enough. I guess I'm just disappointed that the procedure not nearly as guaranteed or safe as the ads make it out to be. I live in dc and all your hear on the radio is tlc laser eye center or eye doctors of Washington.
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:55 PM
 
8,936 posts, read 15,860,546 times
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It's definitely a decision no one should take lightly - especially with short term/long term outlooks. If career options play into that decision then it's definitely important

I'm very happy with my surgery. Everyone I know out here is happy with theirs (I have about 5 friends + my wife who went through it). I came out the worse with going forward vision at 20/20. I also had the best vision going into the procedure. My wife had to have it done twice to get the right amount of improvement (she ended up with 20/16).

Haloing was definitely there for the first month or two, but resolved - I actually see better at night now than I did before (night vision was an issue for me though) .... eye dryness didn't move much at all (my eyes have always been dry and it's worse now that i've picked up some allergies)

There are risks though for sure and everyone is different ... different needs, expectations and results

If you do it, definitely go reputable
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Old 04-05-2011, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,791,509 times
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I just had an eye exam yesterday. They mentioned lasik - around $4800 for two eyes.

Forget it.
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Old 04-05-2011, 04:21 PM
 
1,167 posts, read 1,733,800 times
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I think if LASIK were the only means of correcting vision in the world, and later someone came along and invented glasses and contacts, that person would win the Nobel prize in medicine. Or science. Or something.
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Old 04-05-2011, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,639 posts, read 53,524,973 times
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Well, if you wait until you are old enough, catarct surgery usually gives 20/20or 20/25 with no glasses. They remove your natural lens and implant a bio-acrylic one to correct your vision.
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:27 PM
 
14,696 posts, read 18,774,442 times
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I had lasik surgery six years ago and, because of my age, I opted for monovision...where one eye is corrected for distance vision and the other eye is corrected for closeup vision.

Reading everything that can go wrong is scary -- but I'm thrilled with my results. I was wearing bifocals when I was 10 and, after the lasik surgery, I was able to get my driver's license amended to show no restrictions.

Dry eyes? Yes, I have them -- but I have no symptoms. Halos, glare, ghosting at night? I had it for a while after the lasik but either I adjusted to it or it went away. In any event, it's not an issue now. $4,800? Yes, that's just about what I paid in 2005. There are drive-thru lasik places that will perform surgery on your eyes for $500 nowadays. But how much are your eyes worth?????
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:59 PM
 
1,785 posts, read 2,922,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Megadell View Post
My optometrist told me that the likely hood of me having the quality of vision I have when I wear glasses after LASIK is slim to nil. He said while I'm not a terrible candidate, I'm not perfect either.

So hat say you, am I overreacting tonthe horror stories, or are there valid reasons to just stick with glasses and contacts. I'm just worried because I can't undo surgery.
I think it all depends on the opinion of the optometrist. How long have you been going to him/her? I had my Lasik surgery done back in 2000. At that point, I had been wearing contact lenses since the mid 80's. It was actually at the suggestion of my optometrist that I GET the surgery that I did it in the first place. Apparently I was a good candidate. At the time, I remember asking him wasn't he losing business by sending me to get my vision corrected. He told me that he DID receive a commission for patients he sent to the surgeon, but that in the long run, I would still continue to come back to him for my yearly check-up's and he reminded me how often I was losing contact lenses!

The point is that I had been going to my eye doctor for a long time. As a matter of fact, before he took over the practice, I had been going to his Dad. I trusted him. I also knew he had my best interests at the center of his decision. He did tell me that I would probably need reading glasses once I hit my 40's since the muscles in the eyes weaken with age (like every other part of us). He also was very CLEAR on bringing up what COULD go wrong but he felt that he was sending me to the best guy in our area.

He was right. It was, and still is, the BEST thing I have ever done for myself. The ability to see the moment I open my eyes is still something I do not take for granted. The evening ritual of taking out the contact lenses is also not missed by a long shot. I can swim in the ocean without fear of losing a lense, dusk is not an iffy time for my sight, I haven't squinted to see something in years, and I had no experience of dry eye. I was also one of the lucky ones who came out better than 20/20.

I am currently getting ready to kick the door of 50 (I'm 48), and I STILL have no need for reading glasses - and trust me - I've spent my life staring at computer screens and spreadsheets filled with rows of data and numbers.

As I said in the beginning - you need to trust the eye doctor who is advising you. If you've been with them a long time (as I had been), they are familiar with your history and lifestyle and know whether or not you will make a good candidate. I literally thank God that I WAS a good candidate and I'm really grateful I got it done. I also know that I have a great (he's right - 11 years later and I still go to him for my yearly exams!) eye doctor who was young, interested in innovations in his medical field, did not feel threatened, and was looking out for his patient first and foremost. If you are sure that you have an eye doctor you respect in the same manner I respect mine - then take his advice.

I wish you the best of luck in whatever decision you come to.
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