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Old 04-08-2011, 01:58 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,291 posts, read 16,185,678 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
You can't get a cold from smelling smoke (or anything else). You get a cold from germs.

specifically, the rhino-virus in one of its many mutating forms......
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Old 04-08-2011, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,657 posts, read 53,695,203 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by latetotheparty View Post
specifically, the rhino-virus in one of its many mutating forms......
Sorry, I should have said either a virus or a germ. Antiobiotics will help the germs but not the virus ones.
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,013 posts, read 5,340,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
You can't get a cold from smelling smoke (or anything else). You get a cold from germs.
Well , viruses, actually, but in general you are right. OP, get over it.
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Old 04-12-2011, 01:08 AM
 
926 posts, read 1,873,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
So do a lot of smells, (sweat, cheap perfume, garlic, curry), but nobody says anything about them because they're not the cause du jour.
Although annoying, none of those cause cancer. Second and third hand smoke do. Why should my health be put at risk at home and work when I don't smoke myself?
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Old 04-12-2011, 01:15 AM
 
926 posts, read 1,873,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
You can't get a cold from smelling smoke (or anything else). You get a cold from germs.
Perhaps not directly, however when the body is attacked by toxic odors, the immune system is taxed and the nose's natural reaction is to fight the foreign substance by sneezing it out, for example. Over time the irritants will wear down the body making it more susceptible to the cold virus. I'm convinced that's what happened last week. Constant exposure at home+work + a heavy concentration of 2nd hand smoke at someone's apartment put me over the edge and led to the second cold.
Smokers, if you want to drag those cancer sticks, that's your business. Just stay away from me and the rest of the population.
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Old 04-12-2011, 01:57 AM
 
3,807 posts, read 4,818,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValueAddedWorker View Post
I'm convinced that increased exposure to second and third hand (the smell) smoke lately has led to my second cold in 2 months. I believe it's being caused by a combination of all my neighbors smoking (I live in a 6plex in a working class neighborhood), visiting peoples' apartments (I'm moving this summer) and my colleague who reeks of smoke.

Workplaces sometimes have policies against wearing heavy perfumes but what about smoke smell? Any suggestions on how to deal with smoky colleagues? I'm not talking about people who puff away in front of office buildings (that's another pet peeve of mine -I tend to avoid such entrances if possible), but people who reek so bad indoor, it makes you cringe. I've been sneezing non stop this week and I can't afford to get sick all the time. No I don't have allergies.
welcome to my world and neighborhood---sounds like the smokestack next door and our asthma problems HAVE doubled--i too am looking for a smoke free property
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Old 04-12-2011, 02:00 AM
 
3,807 posts, read 4,818,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
So do a lot of smells, (wood smoke, sweat, exhaust, cheap perfume, garlic, curry), but nobody says anything about them because they're not the cause du jour.

For instance, my Doctor is Indian and, after lunch, you can smell the curry on his breath and oozing out of his skin from a block away. Do you really think I'd complain to managment about that? Would I be rude and say, "Gee Doc, you stink!"

No, I wouldn't and, hopefully, neither would you. Yet, you wouldn't extend that same courtesy to a smoker. Why not?
cause smelling curry never has caused a negative response as smoke does in an asthmatic
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Old 04-12-2011, 09:04 AM
 
4,636 posts, read 10,539,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValueAddedWorker View Post
Although annoying, none of those cause cancer. Second and third hand smoke do. Why should my health be put at risk at home and work when I don't smoke myself?
I am as anti smoking as anyone, but the SMELL of smoke on someone's clothes/hair/etc does not cause cancer....that is just silly.

Also, sneezing a lot due to "irritants" doesn't "tax" the immune system or lead to colds....just doesn't work that way.
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Old 04-12-2011, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,084,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValueAddedWorker View Post
Although annoying, none of those cause cancer. Second and third hand smoke do. Why should my health be put at risk at home and work when I don't smoke myself?
So, it doesn't matter? You're going to start a fight with your co-workers anyhow?

It figures.
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Old 04-12-2011, 03:18 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ValueAddedWorker View Post
I'm convinced that increased exposure to second and third hand (the smell) smoke lately has led to my second cold in 2 months. I believe it's being caused by a combination of all my neighbors smoking (I live in a 6plex in a working class neighborhood), visiting peoples' apartments (I'm moving this summer) and my colleague who reeks of smoke.

Workplaces sometimes have policies against wearing heavy perfumes but what about smoke smell? Any suggestions on how to deal with smoky colleagues? I'm not talking about people who puff away in front of office buildings (that's another pet peeve of mine -I tend to avoid such entrances if possible), but people who reek so bad indoor, it makes you cringe. I've been sneezing non stop this week and I can't afford to get sick all the time. No I don't have allergies.
The reason clinical trials for drugs use a control group that gets a placebo is because there are typically 2-3% of the population who get better on the placebo just because they believe they are being treated. Conversely, if someone spends millions of dollars annually telling you and your elected representatives that secondhand smoke outdoors, in ambient air, is killing you, then a certain percentage of the population will get sick just seeing someone smoke, or smelling it on their clothes, because they subconsciously believe it.

The power of “education” is amazing--millions of Germans were made to feel sick and their survival threatened whenever they saw an ambient Jew. And the reason it was necessary to have Jews wear identifying armbands was so that Germans who saw them would know that they were experiencing an instance where they should expect to feel sick and threatened. Little wonder that they DID feel sick and threatened whenever the continued presence of a Jew was brought to their attention. Ghettoizing Jews was a good thing because it protected the people deserving of protection from toxic Jewry. This was exactly why the German people needed the increasing involvement of government to protect them.

For this reason, I conclude that every dime spent, of the millions of dollars spent, by the American Lung Association, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association and other “health causes” in educating people to expect to get sick whenever they see someone light up a cigarette outdoors, or smell it on their clothes, is money that is being spent to make non-smokers feel sick on cue. The effectiveness of behavioral conditioning was proven many years ago by Pavlov. This “see/smell tobacco smoke and get sick” disinformation/conditioning money could be MUCH better spent, I think, in seeking cures for real, non-psychologically induced diseases of non-smokers and smokers alike.

I am a heavy smoker who hasn't had a cold in 20 years. This is probably because I don't believe that smoking, whether first, second, or thirdhand, gives you a cold. (On the other hand, if I smell bad because of my smoking, I am less likely to attract the close proximity of people with colds or even people who would worry about getting a cold.) I consider that discouraging people from violating my personal space is the best way to stay healthy.
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