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Old 11-05-2011, 07:07 AM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,646,355 times
Reputation: 20198

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Pippy: Yeah it's the generic for Synthroid. It's one of the pharmaceutical generics that the nay-sayers use as an example of why generics are inferior to brand names. For me, it does exactly what it's supposed to do, so if it is inferior, then I need inferior. So I'm good with it
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Old 11-05-2011, 07:52 AM
Status: "Cats know. Cats always know." (set 13 hours ago)
 
Location: Pennsylvania
15,573 posts, read 9,599,238 times
Reputation: 26034
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
After being in the hospital and getting asked over and over again the same questions I was just wondering if they read the charts anymore . I mean since I am under two different drs care Im just wondering if they counsel with one another or if they confirm a dx anymore with each other . Does anyone else wonder about this as well ? I mean my husband and I both were like I just answered that ? hello look on your paperwork .
Im curious if anyone else had found this annoying as I did . I went ahead and answered it but really .
Patients say different things to different people; sometimes forget to mention something or they think of a better way to explain/describe something. And leaves an opening for the patient to ask questions.

The chart is for numbers and documentation. Nothing beats hearing it from the horse's mouth. And covers the medical person's butt if more than one documents what the pt said.

If you find that annoying, think how the medical person feels. It's actually for the patients' benefit.
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Old 11-05-2011, 07:55 AM
 
Location: southern born and southern bred
12,480 posts, read 14,377,470 times
Reputation: 19530
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
Pippy: Yeah it's the generic for Synthroid. It's one of the pharmaceutical generics that the nay-sayers use as an example of why generics are inferior to brand names. For me, it does exactly what it's supposed to do, so if it is inferior, then I need inferior. So I'm good with it

that's cool. Had any problematic side effects?
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:07 AM
Status: "Cats know. Cats always know." (set 13 hours ago)
 
Location: Pennsylvania
15,573 posts, read 9,599,238 times
Reputation: 26034
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
100 micrograms of levothyroxine. I did switch doctors, but for pretty valid reasons. The first set, weren't all that great (it was a group - I hate groups), but I stuck with them for years. And then I moved to another town. So I switched to this guy on the other side of the town I moved to. And then HE moved to Hawaii. So I had to switch again, and went to this other group in town. They're worse than the first group I had, but at this point I'm just tired of trying to find *a* doctor who will recognize me when I walk through the door and treat me like a person instead of like a scheduled appointment time.
One hint: make yourself memorable. Find out something about the dr (check the walls for clues) and ask or say something, well, friendly. Like 'oh you went to med school in east podunk. You must like cold weather.'
or 'gee you've got a beautiful family. Was that your daughter's wedding'. Keep in mind it won't be, doesn't have to be, an extended conversation. He's a dr not a friend and time is limited. But it will help him remember you, assuming you go more than once every 5 yrs.
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:52 AM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,646,355 times
Reputation: 20198
Pippy: no side effects of any kind, negative or positive.

PAHippo: as I said, it's a group. I rarely see the same person when I go, because they have a high turnover of PAs and the doctors themselves are constantly overbooked, so I see whoever is available. If I make an appointment with Dr. Smith, and show up and Dr. Smith is an hour behind, I'll tell the receptionist that I'll see whoever is available.

I don't care anymore that they don't remember me, or know who I am. I've already given up trying. They are prescription dispensers and diagnosticians. I'm their 3:30 appointment, they're my synthroid prescription. That's how the insurance companies demand it to be, and I've accepted it - begrudgingly. I don't like it, I'll never like it, I think it sucks. But it's not my job to do something about it, and I'm done "fighting the man" over it. Been there, done that, got the certificate of completion. Let someone else do all the work now. I'm retired from medical politics.
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Old 11-05-2011, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,518 posts, read 26,128,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
Pippy: Yeah it's the generic for Synthroid. It's one of the pharmaceutical generics that the nay-sayers use as an example of why generics are inferior to brand names. For me, it does exactly what it's supposed to do, so if it is inferior, then I need inferior. So I'm good with it
The issue with levothyroxine is not so much that generics are inferior as it is that different generics may vary a tiny bit in potency. One manufacturer's product may produce a slightly different effect from another. There is no other drug that has as many dose options as levothyroxine, because small changes in dose can make a difference.

So if you switch generics you have to go back and recheck the blood tests to make sure you are where you want to be.

A generic is fine, but when you refill it, the pharmacist should give you the same generic each time.

And by the way, when they ask you what thyroid disease you have they are really asking why are you taking thyroid medication.
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Old 11-05-2011, 11:26 AM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,646,355 times
Reputation: 20198
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
The issue with levothyroxine is not so much that generics are inferior as it is that different generics may vary a tiny bit in potency. One manufacturer's product may produce a slightly different effect from another. There is no other drug that has as many dose options as levothyroxine, because small changes in dose can make a difference.

So if you switch generics you have to go back and recheck the blood tests to make sure you are where you want to be.

A generic is fine, but when you refill it, the pharmacist should give you the same generic each time.

And by the way, when they ask you what thyroid disease you have they are really asking why are you taking thyroid medication.
But they know why I'm taking it. It's right there on the top of my chart, next to the name of the medication I need to take.

Left side of that section of the chart is the med name/dosage, right side explains why I need it. Also, even after I tell them "I don't have a thyroid disease, I take it because I had a benign tumor on the thyroid and they had to remove it surgically so now I only have half a thyroid, but that half is working just fine, thanks" they continue *during the same conversation* to ask me about the thyroid disease. What kinds of symptoms am I experiencing...uh - none? Since I don't have a disease? Which I just TOLD you?

Kiind of like the guy who comes in walking with one good leg and one prosthetic leg, wearing shorts, to ask about getting a referral for a new prosthetic, and the doctor asks what kinds of pain his foot is experiencing that would indicate the need to have his leg amputated. All he needs to do is LOOK and he'll see the guy already had his leg amputated, he just needs a new prosthetic.
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Dallas TX
14,306 posts, read 20,563,635 times
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It is annoying as hell. I felt for my mom when she was going into back surgery. 74 year old woman they started asking her the same questions again. She was an edge of a breakdown and they kept asking. Finally they stopped when they realized she was at her breaking point.

The worst part is on her file it said NOT to give her particular medication. Of course, they did. She had a horrid reaction to it and started hallucinating. They need to have someone in charge of patients and coordinate the care so this doesn't happen. It is sickening the amount of mistakes made and money that could be saved if they put a little effort into doing things different
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:48 PM
 
39 posts, read 97,471 times
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Let me attempt an explanation as someone who works in healthcare. The following is under the assumption that whatever is in the chart is clear and legible....

Nurses/doctors HAVE to get their own history and do their own exam. The people who make the payments (Medicare/insurance companies) dictate what an evaluation is - review of symptoms, history of present illness, history of social vices, family history etc. To skip all that or refer to someone else's documentation of your history and exam does not fly. That can be fraud. That's the financial reason.

But don't forget physicians are like detectives. It's their job to ask the same question over again in different ways in case you forgot something. Sure, they can read the chart (if they can actually make out the words), but if reading a patients chart is all there is to it, there wouldn't be any reason to SEE the patient. They can all sit in one room, send one person out for the history & physical and all come up with their diagnoses and treatment plans. It would save SO MUCH TIME. But again, that does not fly.

And what about hearsay? Imagine a case where nurse gets a history from patient, doctor relies on that history for diagnosis & treatment leading to a bad outcome. In review the nurse's history could have been wrong, incomplete, misunderstood by physician or maybe the question asked by nurse to get the history was misunderstood by the patient. Or maybe the nurse is a young woman and the patient is an elderly man who doesnt want to tell her something he feels is personal/sensitive and had the doctor, who happens to be elderly and male too, asked he would have told him but as it turns out the doctor didn't ask and the patient forgot to tell him on his own accord. And now there is a bad outcome. Would you guys not agree there was negligence? On the part of the doctor?

See now why you HAVE to put up with multiple people asking you the same questions or the same person asking you the same question visit after visit? See why the medical folks HAVE to ask you the same questions whose answers are documented in that thick chart of yours they hold in their hands which they STILL have to go through lest you forgot to tell them something or lest something was previously overlooked?

The frustration goes both ways.
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Old 11-05-2011, 03:27 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,646,355 times
Reputation: 20198
That explanation only goes so far. Sorry, but "a benign tumor on my thyroid required the surgeons to remove it, and half my thyroid" every year for the past 20 years, should not need to be questioned the 21st year. It's a given. I'm not showing any symptoms of having any kind of thyroid (or other glandular) disorder, I'm not coming in with a complaint. I'm coming in because it's time for my yearly checkup and my prescription renewal, which is the same reason I came in last year, and hte year before that, and the year before that, and so on and so forth.

Nothing has changed. They could say "Hey Anon - has anything changed since the last time you were here?" And I'd say "nope." And they'd say "so benign tumor needing removal of it and half the thyroid, you just need your panel checked and a general checkup, and we're assuming the usual 100 mics levo, right?" And I'd say "yep." And they'd take my pulse, blood pressure, weight, note that I quit smoking only 4 years ago and recommend a lung x-ray, remind me that they still haven't received the results of my yearly mammogram and scold me for not getting it, and make me promise to get it soon. (which they'd know I didn't get, because my mammogram results get sent to them, which is ALSO noted on my chart).

The chart is also done on the computer, so no one has to worry about anyone's handwriting. The physician doesn't even take notes during the exam. He enters everything into the computer, and the printout is put in the patient file. He signs it. That's the only handwriting he has to read. His own signature.
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