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Old 11-20-2011, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,270 posts, read 86,039,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbekity View Post
I'm confused? In the same sentence you said you were diagnosed with fibroids and had a hysterectomy and the of the sentence you said you were glad you didn't have one? Which is it?
I think she just forgot to type the "not" in her sentence. Sometimes the brain works faster than the fingers can keep up, LOL!!
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Old 11-20-2011, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,485 posts, read 26,089,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I LOVE NORTH CAROLINA View Post
I was diagnosed with seven fibroids in 1998 and did (not ? ~ Suzy Q) have the hysterectomy. I have now gone through menopause and feel great. Mine never did cause me any problems. I am so glad I did not have the hysterectomy.
If you did not have any symptoms, then there was no indication for surgery, right?
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Old 11-20-2011, 12:06 PM
 
Location: So Ca
13,867 posts, read 13,545,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoso1979 View Post
All said, unless it's clearly indicated, I'm still a believer in NOT having surgery if it's an appropriate option!
I agree. Years ago I read a book titled Could It Be...Perimenopause? that had a chapter about fibroids and how many unnecessary hysterectomies are performed when fibroids occur during perimenopause. The authors, one a doctor, believed that surgery was performed for the doctor's convenience, not the patient's, and was done because it was expected years ago. Fibroids are apparently common during the decline and fall of hormones in the years before menopause. In this book, the advice was low-dose birth control pills.

One of my sisters and a friend had fibroids the size of an orange or smaller removed in their mid-forties with success. A coworker is undergoing a hysterectomy next month because after trying all other alternatives, she and her doctor have concluded that surgery is the only alternative.
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Old 11-20-2011, 03:53 PM
 
1,141 posts, read 1,326,570 times
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"The authors, one a doctor, believed that surgery was performed for the doctor's convenience, not the patient's, and was done because it was expected years ago."

Similarly, for years women were routinely given a radical mastectomy for breast cancer. As women became more empowered to decide for themselves what they needed in medical care and began to demand alternatives, the medical community responded.

It boggles my mind how long and how many women have been flummoxed by the medical community (and even other women) into consenting to a procedure that is life altering.

And it's interesting that in other countries the rate of hysterectomies is far lower than in the United States. Perhaps here the greater consideration is often monetary rather than the health of women.
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Old 11-20-2011, 05:35 PM
 
5,500 posts, read 4,414,155 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by winterbird View Post
"The authors, one a doctor, believed that surgery was performed for the doctor's convenience, not the patient's, and was done because it was expected years ago."

Similarly, for years women were routinely given a radical mastectomy for breast cancer. As women became more empowered to decide for themselves what they needed in medical care and began to demand alternatives, the medical community responded.

It boggles my mind how long and how many women have been flummoxed by the medical community (and even other women) into consenting to a procedure that is life altering.

And it's interesting that in other countries the rate of hysterectomies is far lower than in the United States. Perhaps here the greater consideration is often monetary rather than the health of women.
You may have a point there winterbird. At age 47, I was diagnosed with submucosal fibroids which was not only painful, but caused heavy mentrual periods that eventually landed me in the hospital. My OB/GYN strongly suggested hysterectomy at first, but when I adamantly went against it, compromised on Depo-Provera for 3 months to see if this would result in induced menopause, if not...hysterectomy would have been it. Gratefully, it did without surgery. The only side effect was I went from size 4 to size 5 while on it. Now I'm back to my regular size and I feel great.
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Old 11-20-2011, 05:48 PM
 
Location: God's Country
21,416 posts, read 29,533,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
I



I'm confused. I suspect there is a typo in here because you say you had a hysterectomy but didn't.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbekity View Post
I'm confused? In the same sentence you said you were diagnosed with fibroids and had a hysterectomy and the of the sentence you said you were glad you didn't have one? Which is it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
I think she just forgot to type the "not" in her sentence. Sometimes the brain works faster than the fingers can keep up, LOL!!
Yes I forgot to type in the word not I did NOT have the hysterectomy. My doctor at the time said I needed it, but I got a second opinion and did some research and realized I didn't need it.
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Old 11-20-2011, 05:50 PM
 
Location: God's Country
21,416 posts, read 29,533,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
If you did not have any symptoms, then there was no indication for surgery, right?
My doctor at the time tried to tell me I needed the surgery.
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Old 11-20-2011, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,270 posts, read 86,039,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I LOVE NORTH CAROLINA View Post
My doctor at the time tried to tell me I needed the surgery.
Likely because there was a chance you WOULD have issues and he didn't think it was worth waiting to see if you would

You were lucky, you didn't!
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Old 11-20-2011, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,485 posts, read 26,089,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by winterbird View Post
Similarly, for years women were routinely given a radical mastectomy for breast cancer. As women became more empowered to decide for themselves what they needed in medical care and began to demand alternatives, the medical community responded.
It was not until fairly recently that it could be demonstrated that the results of lumpectomy, radiation therapy, and chemo would be as good or better than mastectomy.

It was not a demand from women that produced the change in the standard treatment for breast cancer, it was the result of decades of research.

Quote:
It boggles my mind how long and how many women have been flummoxed by the medical community (and even other women) into consenting to a procedure that is life altering.
Any person having any treatment for any condition should understand the benefits and risks. If a woman has been "flummoxed", she did not do her due diligence.

Quote:
And it's interesting that in other countries the rate of hysterectomies is far lower than in the United States. Perhaps here the greater consideration is often monetary rather than the health of women.
It could just as easily be due to lack of access in other countries. Countries with socialized medicine often have long waiting lists for non-emergency surgery.

Many well informed American women choose hysterectomy because it is the best choice for them personally.
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Old 11-20-2011, 06:17 PM
 
1,141 posts, read 1,326,570 times
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More often than not women are given the advice and recommendation to have the hysterectomy as a first option of treatment against various uterine conditions. And the more severe your case appears the less options you'll be given.

Women should be given the option to keep their uterus just as enthusiastically as they are given the option to remove it.

And a couple of surgeons and doctors, who decades ago were alone in their fight to preserve the whole woman have over the years trained a crop of young new surgeons here in the States to go forward. And that is definitely a good thing!

Last edited by winterbird; 11-20-2011 at 06:43 PM.. Reason: add sentence
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