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Old 12-13-2011, 09:28 PM
 
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always wondered if they are less nutricious when they get kind of limp
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Old 12-13-2011, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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It might be the opposite in some cases. Getting limp is the equivalent to being cooked,and some veggies' nutrients become more accessible after they are cooked.
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Old 12-14-2011, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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It may be more of a flavor issue than a nutrition issue.

Some limp veggies, celery for example, can be resuscitated by putting them in cold water.

Others that are past their prime can go in the soup pot or be used to make vegetable stock.

More hints:

Reviving Wilted Vegetables, Greens & Herbs

How to Use Freshen Wilted Vegetables | eHow.com

Kitchen Cure Tip: Save Wilted Vegetables For Stock The Kitchen Cure Spring 2009 | Apartment Therapy The Kitchn
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Old 12-14-2011, 05:55 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angorlee View Post
always wondered if they are less nutricious when they get kind of limp
Vegetables lose nutrients the second they are picked. It is always best to eat them as soon as possible after picking, but if you cannot then throw them in the freezer to at least prevent them from degrading further.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 12-14-2011, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Vegetables lose nutrients the second they are picked. It is always best to eat them as soon as possible after picking, but if you cannot then throw them in the freezer to at least prevent them from degrading further.

20yrsinBranson
I think OP was referring to things like salad greens that don't take well to freezing.
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Old 12-14-2011, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
It might be the opposite in some cases. Getting limp is the equivalent to being cooked,and some veggies' nutrients become more accessible after they are cooked.
I don't think that's so.
And what vegetables are you referring to?
And o.p., the best way to cook vegetables for optimal nutrient value is to lightly steam them.
And like 20yearsinbranson said, the fresher the better.
Eating fresh and organic vegetables raw is the very best way to derive optimal nutrition and vitality but for many that option is not desirable so light steaming is the 2nd best way.
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