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Old 06-16-2012, 10:42 AM
 
Location: NJ
9,250 posts, read 20,310,879 times
Reputation: 6386

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My daughter was having a bad reaction to a muscle spasm pill & wanted to go to the ER which is not in our plan so I took her to the walk in place who then sent us to that ER because they said she looked like it was her appendix. It was the pills.

I know someone that was actually admitted for 2 days; they supposedly ran a whole bunch of tests to rule out a heart attack; said she had high sugar & sent her home. A week later she was brought back actually having the heart attack they missed.
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Old 06-17-2012, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,546 posts, read 79,869,617 times
Reputation: 38909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
My daughter was having a bad reaction to a muscle spasm pill & wanted to go to the ER which is not in our plan so I took her to the walk in place who then sent us to that ER because they said she looked like it was her appendix. It was the pills.

I know someone that was actually admitted for 2 days; they supposedly ran a whole bunch of tests to rule out a heart attack; said she had high sugar & sent her home. A week later she was brought back actually having the heart attack they missed.
I think to say, they missed it is quite unfair and probably not the way it happened. If she was kept in the hospital for 2 days or even a few hours they would have run blood work that shows if someone has had a heart attack, they also almost always do an EKG immedicately if there is any remote chance of a heart attack. Even doing an antiogram can not always predict a heart attack. Any of us can have every test imaginable done, walk out of the hospital and have a heart attack in the parking lot. That does not mean the hospital or doctors missed anything. Now, if the hospital does a cat scan to rule out lung cancer and a week later someone is diaagnosed with it, that is missing something.
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Old 06-17-2012, 04:04 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,793,730 times
Reputation: 20198
Yeah I was gonna say - you don't have a heart attack that lasts a week. If she had a heart attack a week later, then she had a heart attack a week later. Nothing was missed, at all, because she wasn't having a heart attack when she went into the ER. She might have been experiencing an angina attack, which isn't the same as a heart attack but can certainly cause discomfort and a "spasm" sensation (though it doesn't always cause that sensation).

Also, appendix pain can mimic gas pain and other lower abdominal pain. It's entirely possible that the symptoms were similar, and the walk-in clinic was doing the best they could with the information they were given.
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Old 06-17-2012, 09:40 PM
 
9,863 posts, read 9,018,834 times
Reputation: 7946
In March last year a local jury awarded a man $1 million dollars in a malpractice lawsuit. He had taken his 51 year old wife into the ER. She was having pain in her side, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. She was examined by the ER doc and sent home with some pain and other medications.

She was back the next morning in immense pain and admitted to the hospital. She died in the hospital from a problem with a bowel movement that was evident when she went to the emergency room two days earlier. During the trial, the ER doc admitted to not looking at her vital signs. Had she been kept in the hospital on fluids when she first visited the ER, she would have lived. Her gall bladder was twice its normal size when she was sent home from the hospital.

This is my local hospital where I live and the ER is a zoo. Long waiting periods and you receive hit and miss examinations ... unless you are cut up, blood everywhere and need stitches or shot with a bullet in you. In addition people use the emergency room that don't have insurance, so they wait until doctors office are closed and show up at the ER since it is county supported for indigent care.

We have two doc in the box emergency medical clinics that are opened 24/7 and that is where we go if we need emergency care. If the emergency is critical they have ambulances available and can get you in to the hospital bypassing the ER.
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Old 06-18-2012, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,546 posts, read 79,869,617 times
Reputation: 38909
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaWoman View Post
In March last year a local jury awarded a man $1 million dollars in a malpractice lawsuit. He had taken his 51 year old wife into the ER. She was having pain in her side, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. She was examined by the ER doc and sent home with some pain and other medications.

She was back the next morning in immense pain and admitted to the hospital. She died in the hospital from a problem with a bowel movement that was evident when she went to the emergency room two days earlier. During the trial, the ER doc admitted to not looking at her vital signs. Had she been kept in the hospital on fluids when she first visited the ER, she would have lived. Her gall bladder was twice its normal size when she was sent home from the hospital.

This is my local hospital where I live and the ER is a zoo. Long waiting periods and you receive hit and miss examinations ... unless you are cut up, blood everywhere and need stitches or shot with a bullet in you. In addition people use the emergency room that don't have insurance, so they wait until doctors office are closed and show up at the ER since it is county supported for indigent care.

We have two doc in the box emergency medical clinics that are opened 24/7 and that is where we go if we need emergency care. If the emergency is critical they have ambulances available and can get you in to the hospital bypassing the ER.
It has been our experience, even large urban hospitals treat true emergancies like possible heart attack patients very quickly. Of course the less serious patients might have to wait specially on week end nights. still all in all, I would rather go to the ER than anyplace else if I thought I really needed emergancy treatment. For what might appear to be a broken bone, urgant care clinics are great...

Now, as for the story of the law suit: 1-of course doctors make mistakes, last I heard they were not Gods yet and 2-winning a law suit means nothing. Why do you think so many are settled out of court. It is easier to settle than trake a chance of losing, right or wrong.
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Old 06-18-2012, 11:20 PM
 
Location: Cartersville, GA
1,253 posts, read 2,871,007 times
Reputation: 1080
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
....1-of course doctors make mistakes, last I heard they were not Gods yet ...
Very good point. I hard pressed to think of a profession where no professional ever makes a mistake that causes harm to people. Any ideas?
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Old 06-19-2012, 10:40 PM
 
4,644 posts, read 10,549,910 times
Reputation: 10373
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaWoman View Post
In March last year a local jury awarded a man $1 million dollars in a malpractice lawsuit. He had taken his 51 year old wife into the ER. She was having pain in her side, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. She was examined by the ER doc and sent home with some pain and other medications.

She was back the next morning in immense pain and admitted to the hospital. She died in the hospital from a problem with a bowel movement that was evident when she went to the emergency room two days earlier. During the trial, the ER doc admitted to not looking at her vital signs. Had she been kept in the hospital on fluids when she first visited the ER, she would have lived. Her gall bladder was twice its normal size when she was sent home from the hospital.

This is my local hospital where I live and the ER is a zoo. Long waiting periods and you receive hit and miss examinations ... unless you are cut up, blood everywhere and need stitches or shot with a bullet in you. In addition people use the emergency room that don't have insurance, so they wait until doctors office are closed and show up at the ER since it is county supported for indigent care.

We have two doc in the box emergency medical clinics that are opened 24/7 and that is where we go if we need emergency care. If the emergency is critical they have ambulances available and can get you in to the hospital bypassing the ER.

"Bypassing the ER"?

Where do you think the ambulance takes you.....to the ED...you bypass the waiting room, not the ED. Those same ambulances are also available to folks not using the urgent care center.
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Old 06-21-2012, 05:47 AM
 
30,453 posts, read 31,386,514 times
Reputation: 14081
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
It has been our experience, even large urban hospitals treat true emergancies like possible heart attack patients very quickly. Of course the less serious patients might have to wait specially on week end nights. still all in all, I would rather go to the ER than anyplace else if I thought I really needed emergancy treatment. For what might appear to be a broken bone, urgant care clinics are great...

Now, as for the story of the law suit: 1-of course doctors make mistakes, last I heard they were not Gods yet and 2-winning a law suit means nothing. Why do you think so many are settled out of court. It is easier to settle than trake a chance of losing, right or wrong.
In my case, the doctors at the ER were checking for heart symptoms rather than appendicitis when they misdiagnosed me with gastritis.

My father's cousin always use to say that the reason that it is called "practicing medicine" is because the doctors are still practicing on us (the patients).
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Old 06-21-2012, 05:49 AM
 
30,453 posts, read 31,386,514 times
Reputation: 14081
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
"Bypassing the ER"?

Where do you think the ambulance takes you.....to the ED...you bypass the waiting room, not the ED. Those same ambulances are also available to folks not using the urgent care center.
If one takes ambulance one gets directly to the ER and normally gets looked at faster than a walk-in patient.
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Old 06-21-2012, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,658 posts, read 53,742,521 times
Reputation: 18634
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
If one takes ambulance one gets directly to the ER and normally gets looked at faster than a walk-in patient.
That is what he was saying.
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