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Old 03-08-2018, 12:48 AM
 
17 posts, read 7,020 times
Reputation: 23

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I just can't believe how anyone could object too wearing a name tag,that just shows you where medical personnel stands on importance to the job.We must have a conference at the nurses station, (forget those lights).
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Old 04-11-2019, 07:19 AM
 
1 posts, read 91 times
Reputation: 10
Seems all hospitals have rude staff. They are very obnoxious to family members. You cannot ask a simple question without getting a snide comment or bitchy reply. I don't take their crap. I give it right back to them. And they don't like it. The only time they look you in the eye and speak to you is when it's time for the patient to go home. So tired of it. What happened to common courtesy? It's not my problem they work 12 hour shifts, etc. That's their job and they knew it going in. Can't handle it, get a different job. Usually though, they are all congregating at the nurses' station, laughing and talking loudly. They act superior and talk to you like you just stepped off a turnip truck, it's insulting and unnecessary. Just give us the simple explanation and be on your way, you don't have to be rude and obnoxious about it. Family members are just as important as patients: medical background, transportation, patient support, etc. Start treating us with respect and we will do likewise.
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Old 04-11-2019, 03:07 PM
 
Location: on the wind
6,088 posts, read 2,416,552 times
Reputation: 20808
Quote:
Originally Posted by tish1 View Post
Seems all hospitals have rude staff. They are very obnoxious to family members. You cannot ask a simple question without getting a snide comment or bitchy reply. I don't take their crap. I give it right back to them. And they don't like it. The only time they look you in the eye and speak to you is when it's time for the patient to go home. So tired of it. What happened to common courtesy? It's not my problem they work 12 hour shifts, etc. That's their job and they knew it going in. Can't handle it, get a different job. Usually though, they are all congregating at the nurses' station, laughing and talking loudly. They act superior and talk to you like you just stepped off a turnip truck, it's insulting and unnecessary. Just give us the simple explanation and be on your way, you don't have to be rude and obnoxious about it. Family members are just as important as patients: medical background, transportation, patient support, etc. Start treating us with respect and we will do likewise.
There's an old saying..."you reap what you sow."

How did your approach work out for you?

Quite an accomplishment to have used every hospital.
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Old Yesterday, 09:33 PM
 
244 posts, read 73,589 times
Reputation: 489
I've worked in a hospital for several years. In a nursing home, and ambulance also. If staff are "congregating" at the nurses station, well good for them. Yes, some are lazy, but it's not everyone. Every profession has a mix of lazy and hard workers. The lazy and rude workers need to be held fully accountable by their coworkers and manager. If you need to complain, sometimes it's appropriate to complain to a supervisor or patient relations director, depends on the situation. Everyone should being wearing name tags, with job title listed. There's a lot of amazing staff that deserve credit though.

It's a back breaking job, literally. Try moving 400-600lb patients around on a regular basis, dealing with body fluids, infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis while they try to punch you in the face because you won't let them leave their isolation room and contaminate everyone else and your stuck in their room wearing a respirator for 12 hours with little time for breaks, bed bugs, head lice, false allegations by patients that are on high doses of pain medicine/mentally ill and claim you sexually assaulted them when all you did was take a blood pressure, being punched and threatened with your life and the cops refuse to respond because it's a liability dealing with mental health patients so you basically have zero rights as a healthcare worker, a patient with hep C spit bloody spit at your face, having a teenager shoot themselves in the head and the family is screaming at you to do something when there's nothing you can do and you go home and can't sleep because you're so traumatized.

Or, a child dies after doing CPR for 45 minutes, and your traumatized yourself after pumping on their chest and breaking ribs, but you have to suck it up and answer the next call light and explain to a upset person they can't have water because they may have surgery, all while trying to be friendly but really you're emotionally drained after watching someone die. Having someone bite you because you didn't make them a sandwich quick enough. Again, you have zero rights working in healthcare. Telling a family member no they can't bring in Taco Bell for the patient, because the patient has a massive bowl obstruction and is due for surgery, but they sneak it in anyway. Is saying no rude and superior? No, its what's best for the patient, it's being an advocate, which is their job in many cases of "no, please don't do that". Once I was working in the ER, putting a splint on a young patient. The father was fuming right when I walked in because he needed to be somewhere else, and needed to leave soon. I left the room to get the supplies I needed, saying I'd be right back. On my way to get supplies, a patient I walked past went into cardiac arrest and we started CPR. Needless to say, I didn't get right back into that room to apply the splint. The father grabbed his child and stormed out making a huge scene, screaming at staff because things didn't happen as planned. Sorry, we were trying to do the right thing and save a life. He probably thought we were awful and rude. He didn't see what happened behind the scenes, and who knows he might not have cared. People usually just think of themselves.

The government requires healthcare workers to do A LOT of electronic charting, which often occurs at a nurses station, that's half the job is clicking boxes. If nobody was at a nurses station who would answer the phone, or questions when people come up to the desk. Good forbid during a 12 hour shift, people are at the desk laughing. If you're working in a place where people are sick and dying, does that mean you have to be serious the entire time and never have fun at work? If that were the case the turnover rate would be 100% and everyone would be burned out. I think respect and common courtesy is good, it should go both ways. But, from a visitors perspective what you think you see or hear might not represent the full picture. If the doctor comes in at 9am and says your getting discharged, but doesn't put in the discharge order until 5pm, don't take it out on the staff, they can't discharge without a doctors order. It's not fair to be pissed off at everyone because the doctor didn't handle things well. Or maybe the doctor ordered pain meds every 4 hours, and you can't have more. Don't take it out on the staff, they literally can not give you more, unless the doctor changes the order. Too much pain medicine could make you stop breathing or lower your blood pressure, and wouldn't be safe. Screaming at the high school co-op or aide isn't going to solve anything. Saying no, is not always rude, it's the way things are, because there's rules in place for a reason.

Maybe someone doesn't feel like smiling, because they're emotionally drained after watching a patient die of cancer or they're burned out for a multitude of other reasons. We're all human. Think before assuming, and WONDER if there's a reason a person is behaving the way they are, there's probably a story behind it. If we were all empathetic, and more understanding, a hospital would be a better place.

Last edited by Matthew_MI; Yesterday at 10:30 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 10:29 PM
 
244 posts, read 73,589 times
Reputation: 489
Quote:
Originally Posted by tish1 View Post
Seems all hospitals have rude staff. They are very obnoxious to family members. You cannot ask a simple question without getting a snide comment or bitchy reply. I don't take their crap. I give it right back to them. And they don't like it. The only time they look you in the eye and speak to you is when it's time for the patient to go home. So tired of it. What happened to common courtesy? It's not my problem they work 12 hour shifts, etc. That's their job and they knew it going in. Can't handle it, get a different job. Usually though, they are all congregating at the nurses' station, laughing and talking loudly. They act superior and talk to you like you just stepped off a turnip truck, it's insulting and unnecessary. Just give us the simple explanation and be on your way, you don't have to be rude and obnoxious about it. Family members are just as important as patients: medical background, transportation, patient support, etc. Start treating us with respect and we will do likewise.
What kind of job have you had? Just curious.
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Old Today, 01:01 PM
 
4 posts
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by picklejuice View Post
What I find rude is paying for a doctor I've never seen because in place is put a PA or NP. Really?!

And most of them are in possession of egos that are equal to those with medical degrees/ of doctors.

People, you did not go to medical school!

Get over yourself!
PA do go to PA school SAME freaking thing, if it wasn't for PA's or NP's you would be waiting on a doctor appointment FOREVER!! They are just as qualified get over yourself!!!!
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Old Today, 01:05 PM
 
4 posts
Reputation: 10
and the last thing we need is patients like you who disrespect us and think they are the providers. Let people do their jobs, MA's definitely don't impersonate a nurse. and NO MA is a high schooler, they are fresh out of college probably working as an MA and going to school to be a nurse. way to generalize MA's POS.
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Old Today, 01:07 PM
 
4 posts
Reputation: 10
and why should you disrespectful patients be respected? hm.
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Old Today, 01:14 PM
 
4 posts
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyNameIsBellaMia View Post
Because people don't listen when you try to talk to them. The only way to get their attention is to threaten to let someone else know what twits they are.


And surely you don't expect someone to respect a twit that's on her phone when she should be doing her job, do you? Hint: This is why they're called "twits". You're right...I have zero respect for that kind of stupid.
and you're a twit as well.
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Old Today, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
22,589 posts, read 27,527,325 times
Reputation: 28171
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimone2011 View Post
PA do go to PA school SAME freaking thing, if it wasn't for PA's or NP's you would be waiting on a doctor appointment FOREVER!! They are just as qualified get over yourself!!!!
No, PA school is not the same thing. The curriculum is different. PAs provide valuable service but their qualifications are different.

https://www.sgu.edu/blog/medical/pa-versus-md/

Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimone2011 View Post
and the last thing we need is patients like you who disrespect us and think they are the providers. Let people do their jobs, MA's definitely don't impersonate a nurse. and NO MA is a high schooler, they are fresh out of college probably working as an MA and going to school to be a nurse. way to generalize MA's POS.
Few MAs are going to have a four year college degree, and some will only have a high school diploma. If they have further training it is usually a certificate program or two year associate's degree.

https://work.chron.com/education-req...ants-9807.html

"The minimum education for a medical assistant is a high school diploma. However, some states require training or examinations for those who do clinical work, and some employers prefer assistants with training or certification."

Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimone2011 View Post
and why should you disrespectful patients be respected? hm.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimone2011 View Post
and you're a twit as well.
I think you are proving the OP's point.
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