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Old 03-19-2013, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Louisiana
1,967 posts, read 1,105,190 times
Reputation: 3486
Default Tired and draggy all the time

Some of us were discussing low Vit D on another thread, and many posters were talking about feeling tired and draggy all the time. Rather than derail that thread, I started a new one for this topic.

I seldom feel what I would call "energetic." It's been so long since I felt perky that it hasn't even occurred to me to ask a doctor about it. I did in the past, and some things were found and corrected, which helped at the time, but that was about 10 years ago. Little by little, my fatigue has crept back.

My husband, on the other hand, is a ball of fire! He gets up at 5:15, immediately makes coffee, feeds the dog, empties the dishwasher, throws in some laundry, brings me a cup of coffee....and I'm still trying to convince myself that my need to pee should override my need to keep my head on my pillow! I don't feel remotely "awake" for at least 2 to 3 hours after getting up. At most moments of the day, I feel like if I laid back down, I would fall asleep.

I'm not anemic, I am on thyroid Rx, I take multi-vitamin + calcium + Vit D every day. Blood pressure, blood sugar, and all other labs are in normal range (other than slightly high cholesterol and low Vit D).

Anyone else struggle with this? Anything helped?
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Old 03-19-2013, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
16,272 posts, read 29,836,920 times
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You may have obstructive sleep apnea. Most don't know it. Does you hubs say you snore? Do you ever dream you are stumbling or falling? All signs of OSA. It leaves you feeling dragged out and hard to wake up in the morning. I had it most of my life and didn't know it. Although about 80% of sufferers can get over it by losing weight, about 20% of us are born with structural abnormalities in our throat muscles that mean even babies can have it, as do 110 lb. women.

The first night I had my CPAP machine, I woke up and thought "wow, this is how other people feel!" I was always slow to wake up, needed a few diet cokes or cups of coffee to get going, didn't really wake up mentally until about 10 a.m. Always down for an afternoon nap or felt so sleepy at work I had to go in the ladies room to shut my eyes for a few minutes.
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Old 03-19-2013, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,239 posts, read 11,313,735 times
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Kayanne - do go see a doctor when you can - something isn't quite right. Southern Belle may be onto something.

I have low-energy days 2-3 times a month - usually tied to not enough sleep. I had a sleep study done - no apnea and I won't take any prescription meds. I've never been a sleeper and usually by 3 am - I'm done sleeping which means by 7 pm I'm ready to put my P.J.'s on.

Then I noticed last year that sometimes I wake up and I'm very dizzy and also a bit disoriented....after 5 months and going to a couple of doctors and a fasting glucose tolerance test we found the reason for my dizziness - low blood sugar in the morning. So I need either to eat breakfast as soon as I wake up (I'm not hungry) or just have a little snack - a couple walnuts, 1/2 an apple or 1/3 of a banana with a tsp. of peanut butter and I need a snack after vigorous exercise - which I do 4 times a week.

Also, may I ask you - are you depressed by any chance? Nothing to be embarrassed about at all - but depression can cause lethargy.

Hope you find the solution - no fun feeling low energy all the time.
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:51 PM
 
2,759 posts, read 1,956,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
You may have obstructive sleep apnea. Most don't know it. Does you hubs say you snore? Do you ever dream you are stumbling or falling? All signs of OSA. It leaves you feeling dragged out and hard to wake up in the morning. I had it most of my life and didn't know it. Although about 80% of sufferers can get over it by losing weight, about 20% of us are born with structural abnormalities in our throat muscles that mean even babies can have it, as do 110 lb. women.

The first night I had my CPAP machine, I woke up and thought "wow, this is how other people feel!" I was always slow to wake up, needed a few diet cokes or cups of coffee to get going, didn't really wake up mentally until about 10 a.m. Always down for an afternoon nap or felt so sleepy at work I had to go in the ladies room to shut my eyes for a few minutes.

You know...this is an interesting suggestion. I'm not overweight, but I do suffer from sleep paralysis. Often in this state I 'dream' that I'm suffocating. I've always thought this was due to being 'awake' while my body was asleep and hence being unable to regulate my own breathing (because my body is breathing on its own and I can't take back control, so feel like I'm fighting against something to breath.' Now I wonder if what I'm feeling isn't actually sleep apnea of some kind.
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:09 PM
 
19,059 posts, read 21,756,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
You may have obstructive sleep apnea. Most don't know it. Does you hubs say you snore? Do you ever dream you are stumbling or falling? All signs of OSA. It leaves you feeling dragged out and hard to wake up in the morning. I had it most of my life and didn't know it. Although about 80% of sufferers can get over it by losing weight, about 20% of us are born with structural abnormalities in our throat muscles that mean even babies can have it, as do 110 lb. women.

The first night I had my CPAP machine, I woke up and thought "wow, this is how other people feel!" I was always slow to wake up, needed a few diet cokes or cups of coffee to get going, didn't really wake up mentally until about 10 a.m. Always down for an afternoon nap or felt so sleepy at work I had to go in the ladies room to shut my eyes for a few minutes.
Agree completely. I resisted like crazy, but finally had testing done. I stopped breathing 121 times in 3 hours. I now use a CPAP and have trouble sleeping without it. I cannot attest to a great change in energy levels, but I have other problems that affect energy (blood pressure medicine really saps my energy for one) but I actually can get a full night's sleep, something I hadn't done in years. And no snoring! Mrs Tek says, "Yes!!"

If you do I recommend a mask like this one. I run the hose over the top of my head because we have a sleigh bed.

ResMed Swift FX™ Nasal Pillows System

It is the quietest and least invasive I've found. They take some getting used to, but it's worth it.

I am finally healthy enough to start exercising again (looong story) and it's helping. It's amazing how little it takes to make you feel better and have more energy.
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Old 03-20-2013, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Louisiana
1,967 posts, read 1,105,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post

The first night I had my CPAP machine, I woke up and thought "wow, this is how other people feel!"
I would love to experience that feeling! I'll ask my dr about a sleep study at my next visit. I can't imagine anyone sleeping well in those awful-looking CPAP machines, but apparently they do help some people.

My hub tried one for a while (this was before I knew him). He says he never could get used to it, so he quit using it. Also, I asked him yesterday if he thought I might have sleep apnea, and he said he never hears me gasping for a breath, but he does hear me snore. He has always told me in the past that my snoring is very soft (he calls it "purring") but apparently he downplayed it in an effort to be kind. Yesterday, when I pushed him regarding the importance of an honest answer, he admitted that my snoring can be loud if I am sleeping on my back. (how embarassing!)

I'm trying to exercise more, hoping that will get my strength and perkiness up, but it's hard to do when I have so little energy.
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Old 03-20-2013, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
16,272 posts, read 29,836,920 times
Reputation: 12102
This is the mask I like best: Puritan Bennett Breeze nasal pillow CPAP mask for sleep apnea. It allows me to sleep on my side or back.

According to the sleep specialist I saw, all snoring is abnormal: stopped up nose, sleep apnea, deviated septum.
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Old 03-20-2013, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Louisiana
1,967 posts, read 1,105,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
According to the sleep specialist I saw, all snoring is abnormal: stopped up nose, sleep apnea, deviated septum.
Really? Well, I do have a constantly stopped up nose, so maybe that's the cause of my snoring. But if I'm snoring without having sleep apnea, I wonder if that would still be related to not sleeping WELL, and always feeling tired.

I'm also wondering about that little device called a FitBit. I've heard it tracks how many times a night a person wakes up.
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Old 03-20-2013, 12:07 PM
Status: "Selling Real Estate on Cape Cod" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Brewster
1,491 posts, read 1,068,092 times
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Good uninterupted sleep is very important and being hydrated throughout the day is too.
Eat right, sleep well, exercise and drink up. You will feel better
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Old 03-20-2013, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,239 posts, read 11,313,735 times
Reputation: 6207
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayanne View Post
Really? Well, I do have a constantly stopped up nose, so maybe that's the cause of my snoring. But if I'm snoring without having sleep apnea, I wonder if that would still be related to not sleeping WELL, and always feeling tired.

I'm also wondering about that little device called a FitBit. I've heard it tracks how many times a night a person wakes up.
Do you have allergies? Allergies can cause snoring and also cause you to not feel great.
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