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Old 03-24-2013, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by key4lp View Post
Important note: Yes,you can chose to avoid dairy products however lactose is used in medicines as a filler.
How do you avoid that if you have to take medication?
There are places called 'compounding pharmacies' that might be able to address that issue. If my problem with milk were that severe I'd consult with one that is nearest and maybe they could even recommend a doctor if your own is not cooperative.
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Old 03-24-2013, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by key4lp View Post
Every single med I take does not have an alternative to lactose fillers. LactAid does work for some people
however after a while it doesn't. But I do appreciate both of the above trying to help.
Yes. There are other components of milk that a person can react to. Lactose is just one of them. In the height of my dairy problem, when I finally learned of what my problem was, lactase supplements like lactaid were only partially helpful. I was so bad that I could not have a slice of pound cake without reacting to the milk in it.

I was born on a farm, so there was lots of dairy in my diet and in those days food allergies and sensitivities were pretty much unheard of. My mother had me to the doctors so often that he would not charge her.
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Old 03-24-2013, 05:02 AM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cape_fisherman View Post
At nearly 40 years of age...I'm not aware of a single family member, friend, or acquaintance that is lactose intolerant.

Go figure.
Congratulations. It is really a sad thing to go through life feeling gassy and increasingly run down and never being able to have enough energy to do a decent day's work for the first thirty years of your life.

I went to the Atkins center in NY. He tested me and told me NO DAIRY - at all. Within a short time the change was so remarkable that I would have sworn I was drugged with something that increased my vigor, my joy of living, but I knew everything I had ingested. I had been so debilitated by the dairy in my diet that feeling lousy had become the norm for me.

It's a genetic thing. Either you have it or you don't.
Like gluten tolerance. There are now people who think gluten is bad for them but they really have the gene that handles it. They avoid it anyway, somehow thinking it's healthy. That doesn't make sense.

I, now use soy milk on most things, but there is too much sugar added to commercial soy milk. I used to like Silk Unsweetened until they added a vanilla flavoring to it. That's nice on cereal, but rough in cooking savory foods.
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Old 03-25-2013, 10:24 AM
 
487 posts, read 594,841 times
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[quote=in_newengland;28808993]People tend to become lactose intolerant as they age. Ask those same people when they're in their 60s and 70s and you'll find lactose intolerance.

People today DO have more allergies than before. They're not making it up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goldengrain View Post
There are places called 'compounding pharmacies' that might be able to address that issue. If my problem with milk were that severe I'd consult with one that is nearest and maybe they could even recommend a doctor if your own is not cooperative.
I'm sure there are however my meds would cost a fortune. Also I have spoken to many good doctors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goldengrain View Post
Yes. There are other components of milk that a person can react to. Lactose is just one of them. In the height of my dairy problem, when I finally learned of what my problem was, lactase supplements like lactaid were only partially helpful. I was so bad that I could not have a slice of pound cake without reacting to the milk in it.

I was born on a farm, so there was lots of dairy in my diet and in those days food allergies and sensitivities were pretty much unheard of. My mother had me to the doctors so often that he would not charge her.
Want to thank Cliffe's response. I didn't want to go into great detail so let me just say that - ok I'm
lactose intolerant and have a dairy allergy. Very frustrating when you don't want to cook from scratch
every day on top of everything else a person has to do.
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Old 03-25-2013, 01:38 PM
 
1,459 posts, read 1,943,078 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
This is only true of homogenized, pasteurized milk. I don't have any problem with raw milk at all.

Did you know that homogenized, pasteurized milk will kill a calf in less than four months? Think about it.

20yrsinBranson
The calf story is a myth. Many calves are fed pasteurized milk. Fewer are fed homogenized but I have looked for proof that it will "kill" them for the past 5 years and haven't found it yet.

Consider that millions of human babies are fed on formula, which is more processed than past/hom grocery store milk. While over a population a few more die than breastfed babies, nearly all thrive.

Now I can agree that some folks can imbibe raw milk that cannot handle the commercial product. I enjoy raw Geurnsey milk, myself. But Lactaid is far safer across massive nations that truck milk from one state to another.
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Old 03-25-2013, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Harbor Springs, Michigan
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I have become progressively more intolerant to dairy produce but only in the US. When I go back to the UK and also recently in Italy I have had no problems with eating cheeses, drinking milk or even adding cream to my coffee. I can only deduce that I'm reacting to something else thats in the dairy produce here (the US). It really makes you wonder when you read the labels on cheeses and yoghurts why half the ingredients are needed, yoghurt isn't a sweet treat so it doesn't need sugar and definitely not HFCS. Luckily I've found a local dairy that has rBST free milk which I can tolerate.
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Old 03-25-2013, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan Alaska View Post
I have become progressively more intolerant to dairy produce but only in the US. When I go back to the UK and also recently in Italy I have had no problems with eating cheeses, drinking milk or even adding cream to my coffee. I can only deduce that I'm reacting to something else thats in the dairy produce here (the US). It really makes you wonder when you read the labels on cheeses and yoghurts why half the ingredients are needed, yoghurt isn't a sweet treat so it doesn't need sugar and definitely not HFCS. Luckily I've found a local dairy that has rBST free milk which I can tolerate.
You probably could react to a lot of things.
Are the grasses chemically the same in these countries? Do we use some treatment on them? Do we add things to the feed of these animals? Antibiotics? Are the animals different?

I heard a doctor once, though it's hard for me to believe, say a person could be sensitive to one cut of beef but not another, to one type of apple but not another.
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Old 03-26-2013, 12:54 PM
 
3,050 posts, read 3,170,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rohirette View Post
The calf story is a myth. Many calves are fed pasteurized milk. Fewer are fed homogenized but I have looked for proof that it will "kill" them for the past 5 years and haven't found it yet.

Consider that millions of human babies are fed on formula, which is more processed than past/hom grocery store milk. While over a population a few more die than breastfed babies, nearly all thrive.

Now I can agree that some folks can imbibe raw milk that cannot handle the commercial product. I enjoy raw Geurnsey milk, myself. But Lactaid is far safer across massive nations that truck milk from one state to another.
i was going to call out the poster of the dead calf statement as well, but you beat me to it. I will venture further though, and question YOU about your "Many calves are fed pasteurized milk." line. Why would a farmer truck his milk miles away to have it pasteurized, and then hauled back again to feed it to a calf which is probably standing within 50 yards of the cow it came from in the first place?
Same thing with "fewer are fed homogenized..."
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Old 03-27-2013, 03:06 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
14,864 posts, read 27,405,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rohirette View Post
The calf story is a myth. Many calves are fed pasteurized milk. Fewer are fed homogenized but I have looked for proof that it will "kill" them for the past 5 years and haven't found it yet.

Consider that millions of human babies are fed on formula, which is more processed than past/hom grocery store milk. While over a population a few more die than breastfed babies, nearly all thrive.

Now I can agree that some folks can imbibe raw milk that cannot handle the commercial product. I enjoy raw Geurnsey milk, myself. But Lactaid is far safer across massive nations that truck milk from one state to another.
" Even calves fed pasteurized milk do poorly and many die before maturity." Why Do You Believe Dairy Is A Problem?

"When the farmers kept a milk cow on the farm to feed the weaner calves, there were few digestive problems. But when no dairy cows were available they went to the local store and got “Store Bought” milk for the calves to drink. Soon the calves died with diarrhea. .................Moderator cut: 1-2 sentences and link. " Effects of Homogenization and Pasteurization of milk Exhibit C

"Calves fed pasteurized milk do poorly and many die before maturity. Raw milk sours naturally but pasteurized milk turns putrid; processors must remove slime and pus from pasteurized milk by a process of centrifugal clarification" Dangers of Pasteurization and Homogenization

There are many more.

20yrsinBranson

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 04-06-2013 at 12:19 PM..
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Old 03-27-2013, 03:49 PM
 
3,050 posts, read 3,170,711 times
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What a load of hooey!!! Did you read the bios on these "experts"? Here's the guy from the first blog; Frank Lipman: I am the founder and director of the Eleven Eleven Wellness Center in New York City, where my personal blend of Western and many other medicines, what I call Good Medicine, has helped thousands of people recover their energy and zest for life. Just who I want to read and believe in! NOT! He also claims cows are fed feed laced with pesticides, and that milk is full of steroids, antibiotics and bacteria from infected animals! Whatever...

The second article claims MOST cows are infected with Johne's Disease, which is about the biggest crock I've ever heard. Johne's IS a very serious disease, and when it's found in a herd, the entire herd is destroyed. But this article claims that they continue to put milk from these animals on the market.

As with all these crazy claims, consider the source.
I still want to know why a farmer would go buy store bought milk for a calf. Why not just buy a bag of milk replacer at the local co-op or animal feed store? That's what farmers do even if they have cows! It's a lot cheaper than either feeding milk you could be selling or buying milk at the store! A calf goes through around 4 gallons of milk a day! Who in their right mind is going to spend $14-20./ day on milk for a calf for two months??? Ridiculous...
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