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Old 04-05-2013, 09:00 AM
 
6,731 posts, read 9,014,644 times
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I eat organic yogurt and no problem digesting it or any dairy. I'm not a big dairy person, but skim milk, too, once in a while
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
29,813 posts, read 52,748,114 times
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Mmmmmmmm ... cheese ... I eat entirely too much of it. It's like crack to me.

I also eat plain Greek yogurt 3 to 4 times a week for breakfast.

But oddly enough, I can't stand milk or standard yogurt. Just a taste preference; it has nothing to do with digestion.
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Old 04-05-2013, 01:33 PM
 
6,553 posts, read 7,968,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
And some can also share their opinions with others without using words like 'stoopid' and asinine. I don't understand people who apparently have this uncontrollable urge to control other people's eating habits. Wish I could rep you more than the 5 point repping power!

On the subject, the Eurasian Steppe nomads have been surviving and thriving on dairy products and their producers and little else for thousands of years. Must suck for the ones who are lactose intolerant, huh?
The farther north you go, the fewer lactose intolerant people there are exactly because we evolved lactose tolerance at the same time as the European pale skin and blonde hair -- we were living where plant foods were missing half the year and learned to use animals in more ways, like milking them. And many of them are consuming goat, reindeer or horse milk, so there's no lactose issue there. Obviously, we Europeans went at some point from highly lactose intolerant (when no dairy animals had been domesticated) to mostly lactose tolerant, but only after we got past the point of slaughtering cows and got them tamed down enough to milk. In places where domesticating cows never happened, like the Americas, there are still more lactose-intolerant natives than lactose-tolerant ones, see?
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Old 04-05-2013, 01:35 PM
 
239 posts, read 372,860 times
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and my experience was I grew up on a dairy farm in Minnesota and had my own dairy farm for 19 years.

My son bought it from me and has his own herd of rotationally grazed dairy cattle.
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Old 04-05-2013, 06:45 PM
 
Location: South Bay Native
11,813 posts, read 19,464,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffie View Post
The farther north you go, the fewer lactose intolerant people there are exactly because we evolved lactose tolerance at the same time as the European pale skin and blonde hair -- we were living where plant foods were missing half the year and learned to use animals in more ways, like milking them. And many of them are consuming goat, reindeer or horse milk, so there's no lactose issue there. Obviously, we Europeans went at some point from highly lactose intolerant (when no dairy animals had been domesticated) to mostly lactose tolerant, but only after we got past the point of slaughtering cows and got them tamed down enough to milk. In places where domesticating cows never happened, like the Americas, there are still more lactose-intolerant natives than lactose-tolerant ones, see?
No I don't see. Please supply a far more detailed outline.
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Old 04-06-2013, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
18,808 posts, read 49,330,014 times
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Now that this thread was moved to H&W, please stick to the topic. No insults, calling each other stupid, etc. If you post a quote, follow the rules and use 1-2 sentences and the link. We prefer that you back up your claims with a scientific study.
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Old 04-06-2013, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,411 posts, read 14,853,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
I'm watching my cat, who every morning (and sometimes in the evening) begs for milk. Actually, all of our (adult - in the case of the one mentioned first, she's 12 years old and the others are her age - same litter - or close to it) cats love milk. So do the dogs, if they can get some.
Funny, I have had cats and dogs all my life and they never would touch milk as adults. Most, if they are fed properly, will not - or so I've been told. Outside cats who have bad diets, though, are known to drink milk.

I'm sorry. I don't mean to be insulting, but I don't know any other way of putting that.
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Old 04-06-2013, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,411 posts, read 14,853,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
I have milk with breakfast cereal 5 days a week, sometimes more, and use milk in coffee.

I like cheese but dont eat it much because the cheese I like is somewhat expensive, so more of a special purchase. I do use sour cream for things like mashed potatos, salad dressings, etc.

Use butter a lot too, for sauces, bread butter and jelly, sauteeing, etc.

So far, havnt notice anything adverse.
Good for you. There is nothing wrong with dairy if you have the enzymes to handle it. A whole lot of people do not. You should consider yourself lucky. I can tell by your post how proud you must be.
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Old 04-06-2013, 05:55 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,263 posts, read 31,815,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldengrain View Post
Funny, I have had cats and dogs all my life and they never would touch milk as adults. Most, if they are fed properly, will not - or so I've been told. Outside cats who have bad diets, though, are known to drink milk.

I'm sorry. I don't mean to be insulting, but I don't know any other way of putting that.
Erm yeah - cow's milk is pretty unhealthy for cats. Yes, most of them do like the taste of it. But it's pretty bad for their digestive system. Malted milk isn't too bad for them in small quantities (a few tablespoons as a treat). Cats also like cheese, but they really shouldn't get too much of it other than the occasional nibble for a treat.

The fact is, adults of all species have no "need" for dairy. However, it's still tasty for many people and animals, and some can tolerate it better than others.
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Old 04-07-2013, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,411 posts, read 14,853,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
Erm yeah - cow's milk is pretty unhealthy for cats. Yes, most of them do like the taste of it. But it's pretty bad for their digestive system. Malted milk isn't too bad for them in small quantities (a few tablespoons as a treat). Cats also like cheese, but they really shouldn't get too much of it other than the occasional nibble for a treat.

The fact is, adults of all species have no "need" for dairy. However, it's still tasty for many people and animals, and some can tolerate it better than others.
None of my cats liked either milk or cheese, so I must have had exceptional cats. I always bought them the best food that I could and gave them vitamins. I've had lots of cats in my life and a few dogs. Dogs might eat cheese, but my cats were always fussy.
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