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Old 04-17-2013, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
1,820 posts, read 3,721,580 times
Reputation: 1886

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I am 46, have been having mammograms every 2 years sunce I was 36... My mom had bc... She is thankfully- a survivor.
I just posted something about abnormal mammograms in another thread. Just had my mammo 2 weeks ago and it was the 1st time that I didn't receive my results right away.. I just got them this week, almost 2 weeks after. Ridiculous, but all is fine.

I have friends who have never had one & always use the excuse that they don't have any history in their family, but neither did my mom....

 
Old 04-18-2013, 07:15 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 83,424,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYMD67 View Post
I have friends who have never had one & always use the excuse that they don't have any history in their family, but neither did my mom....
I was pretty upset when I learned the majority of people who get breast cancer don't have a family history. So much media attention is given to family history that it gives everyone else a false sense of security. (I was one of those people who thought it was unlikely for me.) Of course, the odds are dramatically higher with a family history, but they really should do a better job of educating the public about how anyone can get breast cancer since family history is only a small percentage of women who get breast cancer.

I'll post this from the American Cancer Society to make this clear:

Quote:
Altogether, less than 15% of women with breast cancer have a family member with this disease. This means that most (over 85%) women who get breast cancer do not have a family history of this disease.

What are the risk factors for breast cancer?
I know so many people who have gotten breast cancer. An old high school friend who was the mother of children in my child's grade died at age 32. My other dear friend is a survivor. My sister's friend is a survivor. My neighbor across the street is a survivor. My SIL is a survivor. These are all women who got breast cancer well before they were 50. People don't realize how common it is.

The chances are 1 in 8 women! Not one in a million. Not one in a hundred thousand. 1 in 8 women get breast cancer!
 
Old 04-18-2013, 12:15 PM
 
14,000 posts, read 27,533,029 times
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It comes down to a personal choice - like a few others here I have had one once about 15 years ago, and it was not a good experience. I am now 63 years old, and don't plan to have another one. I don't have pap smears or colonoscopy (sp?) either. That doesn't mean I don't think anyone should, it's just my own decision for my own reasons.
 
Old 04-18-2013, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
1,820 posts, read 3,721,580 times
Reputation: 1886
I understand it is a personal choice & I HATE going to the dr's, for anything.. The anxiety I have before going for anything,mammograms included, is awful.
I guess I just think it is a poor excuse " I don't have any history".
As Hopes said above, the media really needs to be more responsible and explain that not having a history, doesn't mean you are exempt from getting BC.

Mammograms aren't fun, but honestly, the 5 minutes of being uncomfortable, is worth it....
 
Old 04-18-2013, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Pearland
438 posts, read 1,129,006 times
Reputation: 305
WOW! I am amazed reading all of these responses. To me, it seems annual check-ups, no matter what for, should be a priority for everyone. I go without fail every spring for all of my check-ups (pap, mammogram, dermatologist, GP, dentist). I do the same for my kids and my husband does the same. To me, I cannot think of a reason not to go. Early detection is important and could be the difference between life or death. My personal belief is that you don't go and you are a fool! BTW, I am a B cup and was told that mammograms would hurt me more (than a larger chested woman) before I went for the first time (at 40). It doesn't hurt, but it is uncomfortable. I find if I don't look at what they are doing then it helps. And it is all over in 10 minutes! The thought of pain is certainly not a reason to not go! Just my two cents!
 
Old 04-18-2013, 12:48 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 83,424,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asonnier View Post
BTW, I am a B cup and was told that mammograms would hurt me more (than a larger chested woman) before I went for the first time (at 40). It doesn't hurt, but it is uncomfortable. I find if I don't look at what they are doing then it helps. And it is all over in 10 minutes! The thought of pain is certainly not a reason to not go! Just my two cents!
It's different for everyone. It can be excruciating pain for me, not just discomfort. My breasts are sometimes tender anyway. That's just the way they are sometimes. I survive the intense pain. They're sore for a few days afterwards. It's certainly not a good reason to not go.
 
Old 04-18-2013, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,327 posts, read 5,806,693 times
Reputation: 10418
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepka View Post
--gotta die of something. Anyone else feel this way?
Whether you decide to care for yourself is a personal decision, but I would certainly not want to proclaim anecdotal evidence as the basis of such a decision. That sounds like fear and rationalization to me.

True, we will all die of something, but many young women with families that needed them are no longer with them because they made that choice. My MIL had breast cancer that was detected early thanks to routine screenings, and she's lived a long life following her treatment.

Do you want to be the one to encourage someone NOT to get screened?
 
Old 04-19-2013, 02:39 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
13,059 posts, read 9,673,445 times
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Definitely for people with a history of BC in the family, have to be screened , personally I have misgivings about them , as in the UK so many mistakes were made telling women they had cancer cells and operating, then finding they were wrong.... also theres the radiation worries. ok its said not as dangerous as older type x rays but the danger is still there...
 
Old 04-19-2013, 07:41 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 83,424,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
...as in the UK so many mistakes were made telling women they had cancer cells and operating, then finding they were wrong.
I don't know what kind of medicine you have in the UK, but they do biopsies first in the US.

They do not operate for breast cancer unless there is a positive diagnosis via biopsy.
 
Old 04-19-2013, 09:55 AM
 
681 posts, read 913,543 times
Reputation: 691
There's a whole industry working to make people believe you need every exam that exists every month. If you put all statistics together, you come to the conclusion there isn't a single healthy individual in any country in the world. Their bank accounts say thank you.
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