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Old 04-29-2013, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Northern NH
4,551 posts, read 9,262,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Litlove71 View Post
^^^this.

The "oxy" that gets all the hype in the media is a Schedule II narcotic, that is very tightly regulated and is NOT for short term use. OxyContin is a time released version for patients with severe pain that will be ongoing.

All opiates come in different mg, for a first prescription a doc would prescribe a very low dosage. Oxycodone is a Schedule I narcotic. If your son has a history of addiction, then there might be a reason to be concerned, otherwise this is a major overreaction. If he's taking more than the Rx allows, if he's clearly "intoxicated", if he's complaining he needs stronger meds, if he's trying to get a refill well beforehand, then you should worry.

No a schedule I narcotic is illegal drugs. Oxycodne is a schedule II narcotic.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:30 PM
 
1,092 posts, read 2,526,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aptor hours View Post
No a schedule I narcotic is illegal drugs. Oxycodne is a schedule II narcotic.
I knew Schedule II were the ones tightly monitored...

More than one source online stated Oxycodone was Schedule I--including Wikipedia. My apologies for the incorrect info.

Livestrong states any Rx under 15mg is a Schedule III category, and any over is a Schedule II.

OP: Schedule II meds are highly regulated and have been for many years, but this is enforced by state and even local laws, so experiences can widely differ. In CA refills can't even be given for these Schedule II meds. A new Rx requires an appointment.
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Old 04-29-2013, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Northern NH
4,551 posts, read 9,262,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Litlove71 View Post
I knew Schedule II were the ones tightly monitored...

More than one source online stated Oxycodone was Schedule I--including Wikipedia. My apologies for the incorrect info.

Livestrong states any Rx under 15mg is a Schedule III category, and any over is a Schedule II.

OP: Schedule II meds are highly regulated and have been for many years, but this is enforced by state and even local laws, so experiences can widely differ. In CA refills can't even be given for these Schedule II meds. A new Rx requires an appointment.

FYI....Livestrong is incorrect then. A new Rx does not require an appointment either just some sort of communication with the doctor. A patient must go and pick up a new hard copy RX.
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Old 04-29-2013, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Northern NH
4,551 posts, read 9,262,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Litlove71 View Post
I knew Schedule II were the ones tightly monitored...

More than one source online stated Oxycodone was Schedule I--including Wikipedia. My apologies for the incorrect info.

Livestrong states any Rx under 15mg is a Schedule III category, and any over is a Schedule II.

OP: Schedule II meds are highly regulated and have been for many years, but this is enforced by state and even local laws, so experiences can widely differ. In CA refills can't even be given for these Schedule II meds. A new Rx requires an appointment.

I see where you thought that wiki states that oxy was a schedule I but, that is in Canada, Australia and other countries which I'm sure have a different structure than we do. If you look under the United States you will see that it clearly states that Oxy is a schedule II narcotic.
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Old 04-30-2013, 01:39 AM
 
1,092 posts, read 2,526,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aptor hours View Post
I see where you thought that wiki states that oxy was a schedule I but, that is in Canada, Australia and other countries which I'm sure have a different structure than we do. If you look under the United States you will see that it clearly states that Oxy is a schedule II narcotic.
By "Oxy", do you mean OxyCodone or OxyContin?

We're getting really off topic. Can you please confirm for the poor OP that being prescribed OxyContin, a time released opiate, is a completely different scenario than taking OxyCodone? Taking OxyContin is a long term commitment and the patient will develop a dependence to the med (different than addiction). Oxycodone can be discontinued after a month or two without going through withdrawals.
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Old 04-30-2013, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Northern NH
4,551 posts, read 9,262,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Litlove71 View Post
By "Oxy", do you mean OxyCodone or OxyContin?

We're getting really off topic. Can you please confirm for the poor OP that being prescribed OxyContin, a time released opiate, is a completely different scenario than taking OxyCodone? Taking OxyContin is a long term commitment and the patient will develop a dependence to the med (different than addiction). Oxycodone can be discontinued after a month or two without going through withdrawals.
It isn't that different at all though.
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Old 04-30-2013, 03:56 PM
 
1,092 posts, read 2,526,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aptor hours View Post
It isn't that different at all though.
The long term use of Opiates require patients to sign an Opiate Use Contract with their docs. Docs can and do lose their license for not closely monitoring their patients usage by frequent urine tests and pill counts. The scripts are VERY closely monitored.

A patient taking 10 mg of Oxycodone a few times per day as needed for a month or two, is not at all comparable to a patient taking ER opiates such as OxyContin, which is a long term commitment, and the dosage levels can be as much as 100 mg for certain disorders like RSD/CRPS.

The following is a link to a typical Opiate Use Contract used all over the country. http://www.sdcpms.com/pdf/form_sampl...e_contract.pdf

The rules and requirements are enforced by the vast majority of doctors. Pain clinic patients are regularly denied opiates because their doctors prescription writing activity is so closely monitored. This often means off label meds are prescribed instead, that have different side effects, but are just as worrisome.
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Old 04-30-2013, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Northern NH
4,551 posts, read 9,262,857 times
Reputation: 3769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Litlove71 View Post
The long term use of Opiates require patients to sign an Opiate Use Contract with their docs. Docs can and do lose their license for not closely monitoring their patients usage by frequent urine tests and pill counts. The scripts are VERY closely monitored.

A patient taking 10 mg of Oxycodone a few times per day as needed for a month or two, is not at all comparable to a patient taking ER opiates such as OxyContin, which is a long term commitment, and the dosage levels can be as much as 100 mg for certain disorders like RSD/CRPS.

The following is a link to a typical Opiate Use Contract used all over the country. http://www.sdcpms.com/pdf/form_sampl...e_contract.pdf

The rules and requirements are enforced by the vast majority of doctors. Pain clinic patients are regularly denied opiates because their doctors prescription writing activity is so closely monitored. This often means off label meds are prescribed instead, that have different side effects, but are just as worrisome.
Everything you say is true. Oxycodone IR and Oxycodone ER which is Oxycontin are both highly addictive and need to be monitored. That is all I'm saying I just want to keep the facts straight here since I do know what I'm talking about
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Old 05-01-2013, 04:38 AM
 
1,092 posts, read 2,526,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aptor hours View Post
Everything you say is true. Oxycodone IR and Oxycodone ER which is Oxycontin are both highly addictive and need to be monitored. That is all I'm saying I just want to keep the facts straight here since I do know what I'm talking about
Apples=Short term usage of Immediate Release opiates in small dosages.

Oranges=Time Released opiates and/or Immediate Release opiates in dosages large enough to establish dependence.

So what type of monitoring are you suggesting should have taken place for the millions of Americans that have have been prescribed a low dosage of IR opiates for 30 to 60 days, following surgery or a severe injury (like the OP's son) over the past 80+ years?
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Old 05-01-2013, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Northern NH
4,551 posts, read 9,262,857 times
Reputation: 3769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Litlove71 View Post
Apples=Short term usage of Immediate Release opiates in small dosages.

Oranges=Time Released opiates and/or Immediate Release opiates in dosages large enough to establish dependence.

So what type of monitoring are you suggesting should have taken place for the millions of Americans that have have been prescribed a low dosage of IR opiates for 30 to 60 days, following surgery or a severe injury (like the OP's son) over the past 80+ years?
What is your agenda? Im just stating facts
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