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Old 08-10-2013, 12:58 AM
 
Location: CA, U.S.A.
628 posts, read 1,042,145 times
Reputation: 244

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I wasn't sure where to put this, but this seems like the best place to since Martial Arts are all about Health and Wellness especially those like Tai Chi Ch'uan that focus very much on health and well-being.


Tai Chi Ch'uan Philosophy:

"The philosophy of t'ai chi ch'uan is that, if one uses hardness to resist violent force, then both sides are certain to be injured at least to some degree. Such injury, according to t'ai chi ch'uan theory, is a natural consequence of meeting brute force with brute force. Moderator cut: 1-2 sentences and link."

Traditional schools also emphasize that one is expected to show wude ("martial virtue/heroism"), to protect the defenseless, and show mercy to one's opponents.[6]" - T'ai chi ch'uan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


I am very interested in Tai Chi Chu'an and its' various forms particularly the Sun Style and any other Martial Arts of a similar philosophy, techniques, and practice with this emphasis of non-resistance.

What attracts me to this Martial Art is not only it's health benefits, but it's non-resistant and 'flowing with water' style.

I was wondering if there any other Martial Arts that at least come close in comparison as I have searched and only come up with Akido (although Akido focuses more on throwing as a form of non-harmful negation of force)?

Also, if anyone has any more information on Tai Chi Chu'an and it's different styles personally, especially how to start and avoid McDojos or non-serious mass-produced dojos with an emphasis on making money over well-trained students?

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 08-10-2013 at 12:35 PM..
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Old 08-10-2013, 01:09 AM
 
Location: CA, U.S.A.
628 posts, read 1,042,145 times
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Just to keep in-line with this forum's focus, here are a sample of some health benefits from practicing Tai Chi Chu'an:

Health benefits of Tai Chi Chu'an

Chronic conditions

"Researchers have found that intensive t'ai chi ch'uan practice shows some favorable effects on the promotion of balance control, flexibility, cardiovascular fitness, and has shown to reduce the risk of falls in both healthy elderly patients,[26][27] and those recovering from chronic stroke,[28] heart failure, high blood pressure, heart attacks, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and fibromyalgia.[29][30] T'ai chi ch'uan's gentle, low impact movements burn more calories than surfing and nearly as many as downhill skiing.[31]"

Stress and mental health

"Moderator cut: too long a quote, see above]"

Each source is cited and the full article can be found here: T'ai chi ch'uan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 08-10-2013 at 12:35 PM..
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Old 08-10-2013, 08:06 AM
 
2,350 posts, read 4,259,872 times
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But for whom is it that practical? Look at it this way, most of us (and I'm not talking about 70 year retired people with oodles of time) have a limited amount of time to work out.

So, with that, what's the best bang for the buck? Not Tai Chi, not lifting weights. It's aerobic exercise. Ask your doctor. If you have one hour a day of time for working out, first priority is some cardio/aerobic activity, then weights, stretching, tai chi.

Personally, I swim 2000 yards three times a week (MWF) in a variey of strokes working different muscle groups and I play full court basketball T and Th. Other than the pounding my body takes from basketball, my routine is pretty good and it's a lot of fun too.
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Old 08-10-2013, 02:59 PM
 
Location: CA, U.S.A.
628 posts, read 1,042,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plmokn View Post
But for whom is it that practical? Look at it this way, most of us (and I'm not talking about 70 year retired people with oodles of time) have a limited amount of time to work out.

So, with that, what's the best bang for the buck? Not Tai Chi, not lifting weights. It's aerobic exercise. Ask your doctor. If you have one hour a day of time for working out, first priority is some cardio/aerobic activity, then weights, stretching, tai chi.

Personally, I swim 2000 yards three times a week (MWF) in a variey of strokes working different muscle groups and I play full court basketball T and Th. Other than the pounding my body takes from basketball, my routine is pretty good and it's a lot of fun too.
Moderator cut: rude and off topic

As to your question: it's practical to ME for MY purposes, because while I greatly admire and wish to practice a Martial Art, there are literally thousands of Martial Arts out there and while the trend nowadays is to practice a mixture of anything and everything, some Martial Arts "fit" certain people more than others. This is the form of Martial Arts that interests me and I feel it is "right" for me.

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 08-10-2013 at 04:38 PM..
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Old 08-10-2013, 03:05 PM
 
Location: CA, U.S.A.
628 posts, read 1,042,145 times
Reputation: 244
Moderator cut: cannot discuss mod actions on forum

Tai Chi Ch'uan Philosophy:

"The philosophy of t'ai chi ch'uan is that, if one uses hardness to resist violent force, then both sides are certain to be injured at least to some degree.

...Instead, students are taught not to directly fight or resist an incoming force, but to meet it in softness and follow its motion while remaining in physical contact until the incoming force of attack exhausts itself or can be safely redirected, meeting yang with yin."

- T'ai chi ch'uan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 08-11-2013 at 10:20 PM..
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Old 08-10-2013, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,288,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plmokn View Post
So, with that, what's the best bang for the buck? Not Tai Chi, not lifting weights. It's aerobic exercise. Ask your doctor. If you have one hour a day of time for working out, first priority is some cardio/aerobic activity, then weights, stretching, tai chi.
The best workouts incorporate a variety of muscle movement, and mix them up from day to day. There's room in every regimen for tai chi.
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Old 08-11-2013, 02:20 PM
 
Location: CA, U.S.A.
628 posts, read 1,042,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
The best workouts incorporate a variety of muscle movement, and mix them up from day to day. There's room in every regimen for tai chi.
Moderator cut: not appropriate

If anyone has any information of Tai Chi Chu'an or similar Martial Arts, please feel free to let us know.~

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 08-11-2013 at 10:20 PM..
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:37 PM
 
Location: CA, U.S.A.
628 posts, read 1,042,145 times
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Thank you Ohiogirl81, do you have any personal information about Tai Chi Chu'an and how one might get effectively started in it as well as information about the different styles?~
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Old 11-23-2013, 12:57 PM
 
Location: texas
5 posts, read 6,198 times
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I found that tai chi, at which I am still not very good, seemed to reduce my appetite. I attribute that to something going on in the nervous system that triggers unnecessary eating. I was not dieting when I began the tai-chi, but I did notice I could more easily be satisfied with a small snack and the cravings for sweets went away.

I use the basic "horse" stance instead of kneeling when I pray. It takes a few minutes to recite a simple prayer like the "our Father" and so it is easy to move and hold each form through a set of prayers. I call myself a :"Zen Catholic", spiritually.

Yes, I know it's weird, but I'm Catholic, and like my brother said "Hey, watchout, I have a rosary and I'm not afraid to use it!" *lol*
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