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Old 03-03-2014, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Ouachita Mtns of Arkansas
1,923 posts, read 2,544,506 times
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In 1991, I had a fusion of a couple of cervical vertabrae. The doctors used bone from a cadaver to make the fusion. Did that change my DNA? I've often wondered about that.
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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No.

http://www.oralsurgeryofutah.com/bone-grafting/

"Allogenic bone, or allograft, is dead bone harvested from a cadaver, then processed using a freeze-dry method to extract the water via a vacuum. Unlike autogenous bone, allogenic bone cannot produce new bone on its own. Rather, it serves as a framework or scaffold over which bone from the surrounding bony walls can grow to fill the defect or void."

There is no way for DNA from the bone (which is dead anyway) to alter the DNA of the rest of your body.

Patients who receive bone marrow transplants are different. They (and stem cell recipients) do have two separate types of DNA, as their blood cells are descendants (mostly) of the donor marrow or stem cells.
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Old Today, 06:20 AM
 
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Thank you. This is very helpful. However, will a dental bone graft alter the good cells in my body? Please let me know.
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Old Today, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Early America
1,466 posts, read 692,391 times
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Everything in your life ... food, drink, environment, lifestyle ... alters your genetic expressions but not DNA structure. Gene expressions allow cells to respond to those things, good or bad. Look into Epigenetics for more info.
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