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Old 10-28-2006, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Missouri
2,814 posts, read 11,892,295 times
Reputation: 2000001281

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I just got off the phone with my mom in California and she told me that my sister's "bronchitis" has turned out to be Whooping Cough and that she's home from work now on antibiotics to treat the bacteria causing the cough. My sister is 43 years old. I was a bit shocked. Her daughter hasn't shown signs of it and she's in a private school and my sister works in an office environment. I was trying to figure out how she got into a route of transmission. I know her daughter is vaccinated. I wonder if she carried the bacteria, was protected against it herself, but brought it home to mama? My mom said; "I don't understand it, you both were vaccinated as children". Well I thought I'd read somewhere that those vaccinations wear off. So I went to CNN.com/HEALTH/library and looked up Whooping Cough. It turns out that the vaccinations taken as children do in fact wear off and that adults who were vaccinated as children or teenagers may be wide open to infection now as adults. It's a nasty disease and extremely unpleasant to go through, and can have far-reaching consequences.
I quoted from CNN:
"In adults, signs and symptoms of whooping cough may resemble those of bronchitis, a respiratory infection that causes a nagging cough — you may have heard it referred to as the "100-day cough." Babies and infants with whooping cough may not whoop at all, or at least not as loudly as older children do. Some children with whooping cough may experience choking spells and turn blue in the face as they struggle to breathe after a coughing fit.
Severe coughing can result in tiny red spots caused by ruptures in blood vessels at the skin's surface (petechiae) in your upper body, as well as small areas of bleeding in the whites of your eyes. You may even bruise or break a rib if your coughing episodes are severe. Coughing may be worse at night.
Even after treatment to destroy the bacteria, your body continues to repair the damage to the lining of your trachea. As a result, the cough often lingers after the initial illness. With time, coughing usually lessens but can persist for six weeks or longer. Some people may even experience recurring episodes of coughing over the course of a year, especially when they contract a cold or other respiratory infection"
.
I'm also 43 and lung problems are the LAST thing I want, but the idea of contracting Whooping Cough as an older adult never occured to me. I will renew my vaccination against it.
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Old 10-28-2006, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Marion, IN
8,191 posts, read 27,455,458 times
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I was just as shocked when I found out that the Small Pox vaccine wears off. I learned that when the Anthrax scare was happening, and every newsmagazine was doing a story about bio-terrorism.

MoMark, are you a twin?
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Old 10-28-2006, 01:17 PM
 
7,079 posts, read 33,722,918 times
Reputation: 4005
I am infectious diseases physician. There is NO vaccine that produces eternal immunity. Having said that, the outbreaks of whooping cough and measles have been directly traced to parents who don't get their children vaccinated. Generally, the minute constant exposure in the community is enough to maintain lifelong immunity, after initial IgG has been produced after vaccination. With no specific IgG hanging around, and LOTS of susceptible people (who should be getting their DPT vaccinations on a regular basis, if ONLY to update the tetanus component), it follows that whooping cough (the 'P' in the DPT - Bordetella pertussis) will be seen. Same goes for measles, German measles, etc. PARENTS: Make sure your children are VACCINATED!
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Old 10-28-2006, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Missouri
2,814 posts, read 11,892,295 times
Reputation: 2000001281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evey View Post
I was just as shocked when I found out that the Small Pox vaccine wears off. I learned that when the Anthrax scare was happening, and every newsmagazine was doing a story about bio-terrorism.

MoMark, are you a twin?
I knew that smallpox vaccinations wear off over time, but I don't know the timeframe. I still have the scar on my upper arm from the smallpox vaccination I got in 1981 in bootcamp. They told us not to touch it and leave any lesions that developed alone and to be particularly careful not to touch that vaccination site then our eyes. I broke out in pox in an area about the size of a quarter where I was vaccinated, but it went away quickly. I had no idea measles could repeat either.
Yes, I'm a twin Evey...and my sister is five minutes older than me. She used to introduce us to strangers with her full name, then point at me and say: "And he's my afterbirth". Well, she looks every minute of those five minutes older than me now !
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Old 10-29-2006, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Not Where I Want To Be
212 posts, read 667,451 times
Reputation: 132
Her "afterbirth"?!?! ROFL!!!
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Old 10-30-2006, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Jersey
2,098 posts, read 5,782,313 times
Reputation: 938
Funny you should start this topic because I just made a doctor's appointment for 2:00PM today. I think I have pneumonia. I started to feel the oncoming of my usual sinus infection (I predict them better than any doctor)...then I went for my endoscopy Wednesday. By that evening my throat and chest were sore (definitely contributed by the endoscopy as well) but by Thursday morning, I couldn't stop sneezing and coughing, my head and nose were so stuffy I thought they were about to explode, I couldn't breathe, you know, the usual. But by yesterday (Sunday) my whole back and ribcage were so sore that I couldn't sneeze, cough or even breathe without practically falling on the floor in pain. My back is still killing me and so I'm thinking possibly pneumonia (or bronchitis). So off I go this afternoon....I'll let you know the results.

Ps. I forgot to mention I kissed everyone in my family hello and goodbye about a million times yesterday (so I may have started a plague).
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Old 10-30-2006, 11:29 AM
 
Location: The Big D
14,874 posts, read 36,236,200 times
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I did not have my oldest vaccinated for whooping cough. When she was born there were risks w/ the vaccine. I did A LOT of research before deciding not to. One thing as a parent that really concerned me was the fact that the vaccine could not be given to anyone over the age of 5 as it was too dangerous. and double If it is too dangerous for those over 5 years of age then WHY GIVE IT TO AN INFANT????!!!!!!! As I said, I did a lot of research on this back then. I'm a pretty smart person and attentive to my childrens needs and their well being so w/ that in mind and the fact that they do wear off we did not do it. Even the doctors have not had a problem w/ it as long as I understood that if she started to show any signs of a prolonged cough or other symptoms that I needed to get her in. Well duh, I do that anyway. LOL!!! Then several years later by the time I had my second child the vaccine had changed. The makeup of whatever it is they use for whooping cough was different and not has harmful so my second child was vaccinated for it.

Same goes w/ the whole chicken pox vaccine. Neither of my children were vaccinated for it. It first came out when my oldest was a baby and not many people got it. Then one of our friends that did get the vaccine for her kids, one of them got the chicken pox a year later. Okay, so what was the vaccine for? My oldest got the chicken pox when she was 2 and had a mild case and was fine. I paid attention to her and she never ran a fever otherwise we would have taken her in for medical care. When my youngest was born the vaccine was more common but still was not a guarantee that one would not get them. Now they are saying that it is possible to need to get revaccinated for the chicken pox every 10 years. That was the other thing that concerned me, adults and the chicken pox don't go to well together. Seems that every year they find out something new about this vaccine so we did not do it. My youngest has now had the chicken pox so both of my kids are good to go and don't need to worry if their vaccine is going to wear off.

In recent years there have been areas of the country that have seen an increase in whooping cough, tb and other diseases and they are mostly in areas w/ a high population that is high in those that are from other countries that did not get ANY vaccines. For instance high cases of whooping cough have been reported in some areas of South Texas w/ a lot of immigrants. It is not just those coming from Mexico that are bringing these diseases with them. On flights from the Middle East, Africa and Asia one can probably find lots of diseases being brought into our country.
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Old 11-24-2006, 07:13 PM
 
1,104 posts, read 3,058,254 times
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Looks like this may be something to worry about.
http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/11/23/health.cough.health.reut/index.html (broken link)
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Old 11-24-2006, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Just a few miles outside of St. Louis
1,921 posts, read 5,082,441 times
Reputation: 1180
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoMark View Post
I just got off the phone with my mom in California and she told me that my sister's "bronchitis" has turned out to be Whooping Cough and that she's home from work now on antibiotics to treat the bacteria causing the cough. My sister is 43 years old. I was a bit shocked. Her daughter hasn't shown signs of it and she's in a private school and my sister works in an office environment. I was trying to figure out how she got into a route of transmission. I know her daughter is vaccinated. I wonder if she carried the bacteria, was protected against it herself, but brought it home to mama? My mom said; "I don't understand it, you both were vaccinated as children". Well I thought I'd read somewhere that those vaccinations wear off. So I went to CNN.com/HEALTH/library and looked up Whooping Cough. It turns out that the vaccinations taken as children do in fact wear off and that adults who were vaccinated as children or teenagers may be wide open to infection now as adults. It's a nasty disease and extremely unpleasant to go through, and can have far-reaching consequences.
I quoted from CNN:
"In adults, signs and symptoms of whooping cough may resemble those of bronchitis, a respiratory infection that causes a nagging cough you may have heard it referred to as the "100-day cough." Babies and infants with whooping cough may not whoop at all, or at least not as loudly as older children do. Some children with whooping cough may experience choking spells and turn blue in the face as they struggle to breathe after a coughing fit.
Severe coughing can result in tiny red spots caused by ruptures in blood vessels at the skin's surface (petechiae) in your upper body, as well as small areas of bleeding in the whites of your eyes. You may even bruise or break a rib if your coughing episodes are severe. Coughing may be worse at night.
Even after treatment to destroy the bacteria, your body continues to repair the damage to the lining of your trachea. As a result, the cough often lingers after the initial illness. With time, coughing usually lessens but can persist for six weeks or longer. Some people may even experience recurring episodes of coughing over the course of a year, especially when they contract a cold or other respiratory infection"
.
I'm also 43 and lung problems are the LAST thing I want, but the idea of contracting Whooping Cough as an older adult never occured to me. I will renew my vaccination against it.
MoMark,

This is good information to know. Thank you for sharing this with us. I just turned 45 this past July, and I know my mother had me vaccinated. But, I guess we don't think of vaccinations wearing off. It is certainly something to be considered.

I hope your sister will get well very soon. Now, go get your vaccination, so we don't hear about you getting sick.
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Old 12-02-2006, 06:10 PM
 
1 posts, read 40,665 times
Reputation: 18
I'm 44 and possibly had the whooping cough back in February '06. I'll never know because too long has passed for a blood test to confirm anything. All the doctors I've seen believe that that is what I had. You have certainly described it exactly how it happened for me.

I came down with a cold one day and, 3 days after I started having dry cough attacks. Four days after that, I rushed to the doctor and begged him to give me anything available on Earth that would knock me down so good that I wouldn't feel the cough when sleeping so I could sleep for, at least, 4 hours. It was horrible (I, now, have a better understanding of "sleep depravation" as a form of torture. It's aweful!) I never coughed so much and for so long in my life. Sometimes I felt that I was going to run out of breath and not be able to breath (you can only exhale so many times in a row without inhaling once!)

Lying down would make things worse, coughing uncontrollably and non-stop. I just could not sleep. On that 4th night, I was sleeping sitting down (no, not just reclined, but completely in a sit-up position with my back straight up). It was h-o-r-r-i-b-l-e, desperating and scary.

My doctor said it was bronchitis and treated me with antibiotics, among other things. No major improvement. Then, he started treating me for asthma. Finally, less than 2 months ago, he referred me to a pulmonologist. That's when I knew I must have had the whooping cough. (I was vaccinated against it as a child.)

If that's the case, let me tell you where I am today. I was left with a chronic cough that doctors don't know how to treat. I'm going through, what they call, standard treatment where they load me with drugs to address post-nasal dripping, asthma, and reflux for about a month until the cough stops. Then, they'll remove one drug at a time and see which one is really stopping the cough. That way will know what condition is causing the cough (very scientific...)

The cough is still there, though, after all this drugs (months ago the cough started to come down to just a few minor and short spells a day, but sudden and persistent enough that it's pretty obvious in meetings at work.)

The pulmonogist gave me a 4th drug to add to my drug cocktail, to attack even more the possibility of reflux. I'll see her next Friday. When asked "what if this cough doesn't go away with any of those drugs?". She suggested I may be allergic to my work place and I may have to...leave my job! That's insane!

Does this go away on its own someday, or is this it? Because the cough happens anywhere, I really don't think quitting my job is a good answer.
Thanks.
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