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Old 07-03-2015, 08:18 AM
 
Location: North America
5,953 posts, read 4,764,954 times
Reputation: 1936

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
1. Your chart only covers the fees charged to the patient, and doesn't indicate quality of service, likelihood of a need to return for followup care, and actual incidences of follow-up care available in the USA.
2. In the USA, most of the cost is absorbed by insurance, or Medicaid, and the patient only pays a percentage of the total bill. Even in a standard 80/20 plan with a $5,000 deductible - that hysterectomy:

In the US: $4,000 paid by the patient.
In India, where it's the least expensive: minimum $2,300 PLUS airfare for two PLUS hotel for two PLUS taxi/rental car. That can drive the costs up to well over $5,000.


Even with all of the extra expenses the costs overseas are far less.

Again I ask, is there any actual evidence that the services and care overseas is inferior? Is this just an extension of classic American arrogance or is there quantifiable proof that medical care in other countries is dangerous?
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Old 07-03-2015, 04:31 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
9,832 posts, read 17,601,215 times
Reputation: 13972
Quote:
Originally Posted by clb10 View Post

Even with all of the extra expenses the costs overseas are far less.

Again I ask, is there any actual evidence that the services and care overseas is inferior? Is this just an extension of classic American arrogance or is there quantifiable proof that medical care in other countries is dangerous?
I suspect it's this.
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Old 07-03-2015, 04:36 PM
 
1,603 posts, read 913,694 times
Reputation: 1168
No.

Personally seen some real horror stories in the ER I work for from women who had cosmetic surgery in Costa Rica or the Dominican Republic.
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Old 07-03-2015, 04:40 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,253 posts, read 37,323,414 times
Reputation: 20198
I'm not arrogant enough to assume the quality is better or worse, on either side of the pond. My assumptions are facts:

1. Going overseas when you're not healthy to begin with comes with its own inherent risk. It is a higher risk than the risk of staying close to home, no matter why you are going.
2. Being in an entirely other country than that of your own legal citizenship, comes with more risks if you need to extend your stay for medical reasons, than if you had stayed home, no matter how high the quality of the medical care. People have complications. Complications often require extended stays in hospitals, and it requires that whoever you've brought to be your caretaker now has to spend more time - and money - in a foreign country. That also means less time - and money - available to do things they need to do at home. Like pay the mortgage/rent/catsitter/plant-waterer.
3. Even if the surgery was 100% successful - if something goes wrong after you get home, you have to schedule a whole nother trip back to the other country, to see the doctors who handled your medical case. It is a rare physician in the USA who will touch someone else's work without a referral FROM the original surgeon's office, even if they're in the office building next door - let alone another country entirely.

Risk vs. reward: Lots of risk for a discount. And of course insurance won't be covering any of it. Most people have insurance, and most of those insurances cover most of those procedures. The net cost ends up being less, if you stay home - or at least close enough that you don't have to present a passport to cross the border.
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Old 07-03-2015, 06:21 PM
 
Location: North America
5,953 posts, read 4,764,954 times
Reputation: 1936
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I'm not arrogant enough to assume the quality is better or worse, on either side of the pond. My assumptions are facts:

1. Going overseas when you're not healthy to begin with comes with its own inherent risk. It is a higher risk than the risk of staying close to home, no matter why you are going. Not every medical complication is so extreme that traveling risks killing the patient.
2. Being in an entirely other country than that of your own legal citizenship, comes with more risks if you need to extend your stay for medical reasons, than if you had stayed home, no matter how high the quality of the medical care. People have complications. Complications often require extended stays in hospitals, and it requires that whoever you've brought to be your caretaker now has to spend more time - and money - in a foreign country. That also means less time - and money - available to do things they need to do at home. Like pay the mortgage/rent/catsitter/plant-waterer. Examples? If you are saving $40,000 even after multiple airfares and weeks of hotel stays by going abroad then there would have to be some serious (and likely rare) complications to justify staying home and not receiving the life-saving procedure due to cost.
3. Even if the surgery was 100% successful - if something goes wrong after you get home, you have to schedule a whole nother trip back to the other country, to see the doctors who handled your medical case. It is a rare physician in the USA who will touch someone else's work without a referral FROM the original surgeon's office, even if they're in the office building next door - let alone another country entirely. Is it unlikely that the foreign doctor will offer a referral? It isn't like the patient traveled to another galaxy like Matthew McConaughey. Modern communication can in many ways make a city on the other side of the planet no further away than your neighbor's house. Again I'd like to see some examples of this kind of barrier being fact not fiction.

Risk vs. reward: Lots of risk for a discount. And of course insurance won't be covering any of it. Most people have insurance, and most of those insurances cover most of those procedures. The net cost ends up being less, if you stay home - or at least close enough that you don't have to present a passport to cross the border.
I'm not so sure that insurance won't cover some of the costs...

US Insurance Companies Expanding Medical Tourism Coverage | NBC Bay Area

Quote:
US companies, such as Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield and United Group Programs, are now exploring the idea of including medical tourism as a part of their coverage.
And we aren't talking about saving 5% and getting your parking validated. In some cases people may save tens of thousands of dollars which is great if they don't have that sort of money available for a U.S. procedure.

Look, perhaps getting medical care overseas is a death trap...I don't know. But I'd like to see examples of some horror stories before I completely rule it out in case the worst happens.
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Old 07-03-2015, 07:03 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,253 posts, read 37,323,414 times
Reputation: 20198
I think you should just go overseas and have whatever procedure you're planning on getting. Then you can report back here about how well it went.
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Old 07-05-2015, 10:40 AM
 
Location: AZ
2,046 posts, read 3,284,972 times
Reputation: 3487
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I think you should just go overseas and have whatever procedure you're planning on getting. Then you can report back here about how well it went.

I know going overseas for medical proceeders isn't for everyone but I know several who have and had great result while saving 10's of thousands doing so. They've also said the Drs and staff are much more caring there then they are here in the states. Most,not all here just treat you like a number and seem to rush you in and out of their office.

I've never had any procedures done but have been to Mexico regularly for my dental work. Their offices are just as modern if not more then any here in the states. My last visit was for a crown which they did a computer scan of my mouth,think CAD system for your teeth,made the crown right there in house. This was all done within the same day and cost was $400.00 compared to $1,500.00 at my local dentist here which was done the old way with making the impression,sending it out and waiting 1-2 weeks for the final crown to be made elsewhere. I also had a crown done once before in Mx using the impression. First day was prep and gave me a temp crown,stayed overnight in Yuma,Az and went back the next day for final crown at a cost of only $180.00. They key is doing your research and talking to others who've been there and get referrals just like you would here in the states. BTW,I've heard many horror stories about dentist/Drs here too. Most here are scared into thinking ( mostly by drs or our govt ) we have the only acceptable,safe health care in the world which is certainly not true.
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Old 11-10-2015, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 75,545,768 times
Reputation: 36196
Yes, without hesitation. My wife has had dental work in both Mexico and Bolivia, and her American dentist says it is as good as any he has ever seen.

She also had a dislocated elbow treated, under general anesthetic, at a very small local hospital in rural Panama, and it was done very professionally and competently, with no adverse aftereffects.

I had minor surgery with overnight hospital stay in Jordan, and it seemed perfectly profession to me, meeting any standards I might be aware of.

All of the above at a tiny fraction of the cost that would have been billed in the USA.

In fact, I would feel better being treated by a third world doctor, because they have spent their career treating patients on their observed diagnosis, rather than just sending you out for lab tests and then reading the results. A third world doctor can eyeball a patient, and make a very educated interpretation of what he sees, a skill few western doctors still possess.
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Old 11-10-2015, 04:26 PM
 
2,563 posts, read 2,882,858 times
Reputation: 3498
Some of the big well known hospitals in Thailand, such as Bumrungrad hospital, regularly treat people from all over the world. And if you look up the qualifications of their physicians, you'll find that many were trained in the USA. I think that particular hospital also has a USA management team. Anyway, the treatment is top notch, and yet the cost is often 10x less that comparable treatment in the USA. A ticket to Bangkok doesn't cost that much.

I've never had the need to seek treatment outside the USA, as I have excellent health insurance. But for anyone who doesn't, take a look at Thailand.
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Old 11-10-2015, 11:02 PM
 
373 posts, read 349,768 times
Reputation: 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by John7777 View Post
Some of the big well known hospitals in Thailand, such as Bumrungrad hospital, regularly treat people from all over the world. And if you look up the qualifications of their physicians, you'll find that many were trained in the USA. I think that particular hospital also has a USA management team. Anyway, the treatment is top notch, and yet the cost is often 10x less that comparable treatment in the USA. A ticket to Bangkok doesn't cost that much.

I've never had the need to seek treatment outside the USA, as I have excellent health insurance. But for anyone who doesn't, take a look at Thailand.
Maybe for sex change operation? Just kidding. I don't know anything about that hospital.
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