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Old 05-14-2016, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
6,297 posts, read 3,477,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lyndarn View Post
But, tho don't want to get into the weeds here~~ When it comes to blood transfusions..there's a very long panel applied when "Crossmatching someone's Blood" in order to find a match...Antibodies from various disease exposures can very well leave antigens in the red blood cells that could interact negatively between the donor and recipient~~
Almost, but not quite. The antibodies don't form as a result of previous diseases, but from previous transfusions. The hardest people to cross-match, as a rule, are folks who have chronic illnesses that require them to receive regular blood transfusions. They can develop a wide array of antibodies to various red blood cell and platelet antigens, which can make finding a compatible unit of blood extremely difficult. Sometimes a unit that's 100% compatible can't be located, and they have to receive a "least incompatible" unit instead (which is just what it sounds like - the unit in the blood bank of the same ABO and Rh type as their blood, to which their antibodies react the least to).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Riley09swb View Post
I am RH negative and both of my children are RH positive. I had to get a shot at 37 weeks and another one after my children were tested after birth and were both positive. I didn't have any complications while pregnant.
The shot you received is called Rho-gam, and it is a concentrated dose of anti-Rh antibody. It coats the Rh antigen on any Rh-positive red cells that may have leaked across the placenta from the fetus into your bloodstream; hiding the Rh-antibody on the red cells in this way prevents your immune system from "seeing" those cells and making anti-Rh antibodies.

If an Rh-negative person HAS to be transfused with Rh-positive blood (which can happen in an extreme emergency), they generally will be given a very big dose of Rho-gam afterward to decrease the chances they will develop anti-Rh antibodies.
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Old 05-15-2016, 06:15 AM
 
1,149 posts, read 1,413,533 times
Reputation: 2027
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
The link I posted in post #5 said it started in 1967.

Interesting, apparently the information on a dog tag does vary depending upon the branch of the service. Or, maybe they started phasing in the change and started with Air Force dog tags the year before the information was added to the Army dog tags.
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Old 05-15-2016, 03:02 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,145 posts, read 6,332,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
My old army dog tags contain blood type in the event I needed to donate or receive, but do not show the Rh factor. It was my understanding that the Rh factor must also be compatible for transfusion. Rh factor was discovered around 1940 so its absence from 1966 tags is confusing.


See the article below. Also note the interesting chart showing the demographic breakdown (USA) according to ABO type, Rh, and race.


Blood Types Chart | Blood Group Information | American Red Cross
Well, in the event you happen to donate blood now, they'd routinely type it ( ABO group and Rh) on receipt well before it went to someone who needed it. They also do other testing to make sure it's not infectious. And they'll give you the results should you ask. Or notify you anyway if something that shouldn't be there turns out positive ( like hepatitis or HIV).
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Old 05-15-2016, 03:04 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,145 posts, read 6,332,122 times
Reputation: 12709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
Almost, but not quite. The antibodies don't form as a result of previous diseases, but from previous transfusions. The hardest people to cross-match, as a rule, are folks who have chronic illnesses that require them to receive regular blood transfusions. They can develop a wide array of antibodies to various red blood cell and platelet antigens, which can make finding a compatible unit of blood extremely difficult. Sometimes a unit that's 100% compatible can't be located, and they have to receive a "least incompatible" unit instead (which is just what it sounds like - the unit in the blood bank of the same ABO and Rh type as their blood, to which their antibodies react the least to).



The shot you received is called Rho-gam, and it is a concentrated dose of anti-Rh antibody. It coats the Rh antigen on any Rh-positive red cells that may have leaked across the placenta from the fetus into your bloodstream; hiding the Rh-antibody on the red cells in this way prevents your immune system from "seeing" those cells and making anti-Rh antibodies.

If an Rh-negative person HAS to be transfused with Rh-positive blood (which can happen in an extreme emergency), they generally will be given a very big dose of Rho-gam afterward to decrease the chances they will develop anti-Rh antibodies.


Wow, I have to admit I never knew of that application for RhoGam.
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Old 05-15-2016, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,796 posts, read 2,152,412 times
Reputation: 5192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riley09swb View Post
I am RH negative and both of my children are RH positive. I had to get a shot at 37 weeks and another one after my children were tested after birth and were both positive. I didn't have any complications while pregnant. My sister is also RG negative and while I'm not sure if her son is pos or neg she had zero issues as well.
The Rho-gam is given to Mother's who are RH- moms. Here's why you required those shots..but this article explains why you needed it~~ I am so pleased that all went well

Rhogam and Rh-Negative Moms | What to Expect
Quote:
It sounds dire, but the situation can be avoided. That's where Rhogam comes in. The vaccine-like compound, also known as Rh immunoglobulin, is a blood product that can stop your immune system from attacking Rh-positive cells. When an Rh incompatibility is identified, Rhogam will be given, as a shot, during week 28 of pregnancy (it will also be given after chorionic villus sampling, amniocentesis, miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, abortion, uterine bleeding, or any trauma during pregnancy that could leak some of the fetal cells over to you) and then again within 72 hours after delivery (if, that is, the baby is indeed Rh-positive; if he or she's Rh-negative, the shot isn't necessary because there are no "foreign" cells for your immune system to respond to), ensuring that subsequent pregnancies are as safe as the first.
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