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Old 05-13-2016, 08:36 AM
 
Location: God's Country
4,649 posts, read 3,016,696 times
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My old army dog tags contain blood type in the event I needed to donate or receive, but do not show the Rh factor. It was my understanding that the Rh factor must also be compatible for transfusion. Rh factor was discovered around 1940 so its absence from 1966 tags is confusing.


See the article below. Also note the interesting chart showing the demographic breakdown (USA) according to ABO type, Rh, and race.


Blood Types Chart | Blood Group Information | American Red Cross
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Old 05-13-2016, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Except for truly extraordinary circumstances, any transfusion you receive today is only going to happen after your blood and the donor blood is tested for compatibility on more than just the type and Rh.

Medscape: Medscape Access

The Rh factor is particularly important for women, who can have serious incompatibility problems if mom is Rh negative and the fetus is Rh positive:

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/hea...pics/topics/rh

I just donated some good ole O positive this week. I like to pay it forward in gratitude for all the blood products my son received when he was on chemo for his leukemia.
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Old 05-13-2016, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
6,297 posts, read 3,474,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
My old army dog tags contain blood type in the event I needed to donate or receive, but do not show the Rh factor. It was my understanding that the Rh factor must also be compatible for transfusion. Rh factor was discovered around 1940 so its absence from 1966 tags is confusing.
Not really. It was the army: almost all the donors are going to be young men (the vast majority of whom have never received a blood transfusion), and the recipients are also going to be young men (again, mostly never transfused before). An Rh-negative person who's being transfused for the first time with Rh-positive blood won't have an immediate severe reaction, but they will develop antibodies against the Rh antigen which will destroy the transfused red cells a bit faster than normal, and those antibodies WILL cause a severe reaction the SECOND time the person receives Rh-positive blood. In women, that antibody can also cause the death of an Rh-positive fetus. So we want to avoid giving an Rh-negative woman of child-bearing age Rh-positive blood except in dire emergencies when it's absolutely unavoidable. But it's not quite as critical to match for Rh compatibility when the recipient is going to be a young man who's never been transfused before, in a situation where Rh-negative blood may be scarce, and where time is of the essence - in other words, battlefield transfusions.

Last edited by Aredhel; 05-13-2016 at 05:31 PM..
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Old 05-14-2016, 02:21 PM
 
1,149 posts, read 1,412,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
My old army dog tags contain blood type in the event I needed to donate or receive, but do not show the Rh factor. It was my understanding that the Rh factor must also be compatible for transfusion. Rh factor was discovered around 1940 so its absence from 1966 tags is confusing.

I also joined the military (Air Force) in 1966. I just took a look at my dog tags and it DOES show my blood type AND RH factor abbreviated as "POS" for positive. It really surprises me that this would not be standard for dog tags for all branches of the military in 1966.
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Old 05-14-2016, 04:11 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,271 posts, read 10,506,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary2014 View Post
I also joined the military (Air Force) in 1966. I just took a look at my dog tags and it DOES show my blood type AND RH factor abbreviated as "POS" for positive. It really surprises me that this would not be standard for dog tags for all branches of the military in 1966.
RH factor was not on a WWII dog tag of my relative, just his blood type. Here's an article:

"Although the Rhesus factor was already discovered in 1940, its indication was only introduced after World War 2 (blood types embossed on the Identification Tag during the war period included: A AB B O)."

https://www.med-dept.com/articles/u-...-ww2-dog-tags/
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Old 05-14-2016, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Canada
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RH Positive folks can receive any blood donation of same type ( A/B/AB/ABO/O) if their RH factor is NEGATIVE.

The huge complication comes about when a Women who is RH neg. and the baby is RH+..yikes!!! Mother's body will actively fight the baby and unless intervension occurs with early screening...Fetus is directly affected disastrously!!

Medscape: Medscape Access
Quote:
Rh incompatibility can occur by 2 main mechanisms. The most common type occurs when an Rh-negative pregnant mother is exposed to Rh-positive fetal red blood cells secondary to fetomaternal hemorrhage during the course of pregnancy from spontaneous or induced abortion, trauma,[1] invasive obstetric procedures, or normal delivery. Rh incompatibility can also occur when an Rh-negative female receives an Rh-positive blood transfusion. In part, this is the reason that blood banks prefer using blood type "O negative" or "type O, Rh negative," as the universal donor type in emergency situations when there is no time to type and crossmatch blood.

The most common cause of Rh incompatibility is exposure from an Rh-negative mother by Rh-positive fetal blood during pregnancy or delivery. As a consequence, blood from the fetal circulation may leak into the maternal circulation, and, after a significant exposure, sensitization occurs leading to maternal antibody production against the foreign Rh antigen.
But, tho don't want to get into the weeds here~~ When it comes to blood transfusions..there's a very long panel applied when "Crossmatching someone's Blood" in order to find a match...Antibodies from various disease exposures can very well leave antigens in the red blood cells that could interact negatively between the donor and recipient~~ RH is easy peezy compared to the myriad of other factors that need to be considered. However, in Pregnancy RH factor +/- is the primary focus!
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Old 05-14-2016, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,475 posts, read 26,078,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lyndarn View Post
RH Positive folks can receive any blood donation of same type ( A/B/AB/ABO/O) if their RH factor is NEGATIVE.

The huge complication comes about when a Women who is RH neg. and the baby is RH+..yikes!!! Mother's body will actively fight the baby and unless intervension occurs with early screening...Fetus is directly affected disastrously!!

Medscape: Medscape Access


But, tho don't want to get into the weeds here~~ When it comes to blood transfusions..there's a very long panel applied when "Crossmatching someone's Blood" in order to find a match...Antibodies from various disease exposures can very well leave antigens in the red blood cells that could interact negatively between the donor and recipient~~ RH is easy peezy compared to the myriad of other factors that need to be considered. However, in Pregnancy RH factor +/- is the primary focus!
I assume you mean an Rh positive person can receive a donation of the same type if the donor is Rh negative.

The red blood cell antigens and antibodies of significance in blood transfusion have nothing to do with infections. Your blood type and Rh status are genetically determined, and there are other antigens that are also genetically determined. The crossmatch process looks for incompatibilities in more than just type and Rh.

Infectious diseases are, of course, also important, but it is because we do not want to infect the recipient with something the donor has, not because infections change the antigens on red blood cells.
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Old 05-14-2016, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Charlotte Area
3,165 posts, read 2,895,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lyndarn View Post
RH Positive folks can receive any blood donation of same type ( A/B/AB/ABO/O) if their RH factor is NEGATIVE.

The huge complication comes about when a Women who is RH neg. and the baby is RH+..yikes!!! Mother's body will actively fight the baby and unless intervension occurs with early screening...Fetus is directly affected disastrously!!

Medscape: Medscape Access


But, tho don't want to get into the weeds here~~ When it comes to blood transfusions..there's a very long panel applied when "Crossmatching someone's Blood" in order to find a match...Antibodies from various disease exposures can very well leave antigens in the red blood cells that could interact negatively between the donor and recipient~~ RH is easy peezy compared to the myriad of other factors that need to be considered. However, in Pregnancy RH factor +/- is the primary focus!
I am RH negative and both of my children are RH positive. I had to get a shot at 37 weeks and another one after my children were tested after birth and were both positive. I didn't have any complications while pregnant. My sister is also RG negative and while I'm not sure if her son is pos or neg she had zero issues as well.
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Old 05-14-2016, 07:25 PM
 
Location: God's Country
4,649 posts, read 3,016,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
My old army dog tags contain blood type in the event I needed to donate or receive, but do not show the Rh factor. It was my understanding that the Rh factor must also be compatible for transfusion. Rh factor was discovered around 1940 so its absence from 1966 tags is confusing.


See the article below. Also note the interesting chart showing the demographic breakdown (USA) according to ABO type, Rh, and race.


Blood Types Chart | Blood Group Information | American Red Cross
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary2014 View Post
I also joined the military (Air Force) in 1966. I just took a look at my dog tags and it DOES show my blood type AND RH factor abbreviated as "POS" for positive. It really surprises me that this would not be standard for dog tags for all branches of the military in 1966.
Mine from 1966 (Army) show "B." No "POS" or "NEG."
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Old 05-14-2016, 07:28 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,271 posts, read 10,506,470 times
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The link I posted in post #5 said it started in 1967.
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