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Old 06-15-2016, 12:15 PM
 
2,484 posts, read 1,727,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
My dad has dementia and he cries for about 6 hours every day, despite taking medications that are supposed to prevent that. The only coherent sentence I've heard from him in the last year is "I want to die."

Anyone who thinks dementia is a peaceful way to go or that the dementia patient isn't at least partly aware of their loss has never watched a family member suffer from it. It's horrible.
Or ALS (the flip side of the coin). These anti-euthanasia people just think longevity is like, really it! No it isn't. When someone decides their useful enjoyable days are over, if they "Want To Die" for pete sakes let them. Why make them hang themselves from a closet door and go without one lick of dignity? Do you fools think a wall splattered with brains and blood is like, so cool? Oh yeah. It happens. But they've outlawed things like "Hemlock Club." If you didn't get your box 30 years ago, you're out of luck.


No its not a thing for physicians. It should be a sub-specialty of undertakers. And LEGAL!
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Old 06-15-2016, 01:01 PM
 
6,121 posts, read 3,320,648 times
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Is the OP's friend getting proper physical and occupational therapy?
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Old 06-15-2016, 05:02 PM
 
4,627 posts, read 10,504,468 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
More and more info out there daily about some of the drugs people are taking in today's world and advanced dementia and alz. I know back in the "old days" all today's modern drugs were not being taken by the older folks or any folks.
That's because in the "old days" those folks who would have been taking today's "modern drugs" were already dead from conditions that "modern drugs" could have saved them from...
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Old 06-15-2016, 07:09 PM
 
18,827 posts, read 6,149,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
That's because in the "old days" those folks who would have been taking today's "modern drugs" were already dead from conditions that "modern drugs" could have saved them from...
I don't think so. I have many relatives who lived long lives and not on today's drugs!!!!
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Old 06-15-2016, 07:32 PM
 
4,784 posts, read 4,667,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
I don't think so. I have many relatives who lived long lives and not on today's drugs!!!!
Yes, your anecdotes are the only thing that matters. Not the fact that, on average, people live longer today. And I could say, "I have so many relatives who lived long lives and not with today's vaccines!" --- doesn't mean that they don't save lives just because they happened to avoid getting the disease.

And hip surgeries are not elective for everybody. My other guess is if you have friends well into their nineties who have no issues walking there is no issue that requires a replacement---people don't just do these surgeries for fun. My grandmother was literally bone-on-bone, could barely walk and was actually messing up her knee from an attempt to compensate for the hip. It's one thing to have join pain and still walk around (like I do) it's another thing to not be able to walk at all.

OP, have you spoken to the family? Have you expressed your concerns to them, asking if they could possibly make a doctor's appointment for her soon? My grandmother was also pretty sensitive to anesthesia, as many older people are, but she was usually okay after a little while. It could also be coincidental, but you never know. Did she break the hip in the fall? Does she do rehab?
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Old 06-15-2016, 11:53 PM
 
696 posts, read 548,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
It's hard to believe they did these major surgeries on a person this old. I had a hip replacement at 72 and I've really declined in so many ways and I'm 78 soon. Many regrets about do this ELECTIVE surgery.

A friend had to do an emergency hip replacement after a fall and she was in mid 80's and declined so much after that surgery...she died at 93 but her end years were tough.

These replacements are MAJOR trauma to one's being, mentally and physically.

My mom lived to 91 and no replacements, she limped and hobbled etc...but I do that at almost 78 with hip job.


You will get comments from some here saying how Great people do with these and yes that's true. Millions upon millions are done and there are many many negative reports. Re-dos/revisions, infections, recalls of products, nerve damage (me big time), shorter/longer leg outcomes...it goes on and on. There are many forums on this replacement work and I've been a member of many and the stories....oy vaaa....


I just re-read your story about your friend and they did 2 replacements at 90!!! That is truly hard to believe. Were these elective or emergency? These are major rehabs and a person this old, good grief.

I have a friend who is 95 this year and walks miles around me, she never had a replacement. Then there is a bridge friend who is 101 early next year, she too no replacements and walks great and both these ladies have fine minds for bridge.
Did you have your hip replacement at a large university hospital or a smaller hospital? Was it done by an experienced and well qualified surgeon? How often did you go to physical therapy afterwards?
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Old 06-16-2016, 06:50 AM
 
626 posts, read 444,700 times
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My 65yo mother broker her hip while cognitively normal and came out of it with full blown "surprise" Alzheimer's due to the effects of the anesthesia. She has needed full time care for the last five years and her decline has been rapid. She was never able to recover from the surgery because she cannot follow instructions (again she was normal when she went in) and her hip is now bone in bone. We will not be having a second surgery and she will most likely be wheel chair bound for the rest of her life due to this fact. She is too frail and mentally compromised for surgery to be successful.
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Old 06-16-2016, 10:43 AM
 
18,827 posts, read 6,149,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tar21 View Post
Did you have your hip replacement at a large university hospital or a smaller hospital? Was it done by an experienced and well qualified surgeon? How often did you go to physical therapy afterwards?
I did everything RIGHT, major hospital in So. Cal., highly recommended surgeon, had 5 "GOOD" months post op and everything went downhill. I did NOT realize I had a shorter leg outcome and due to this it knocked my whole body off....I went for 3 post op appts and probably 10 emails at least with the PA during my post op years....I found more from others on the net about what I was experiencing. I did my PT work and work every day to keep my legs moving without hurting myself more.,

Shorter Leg
Femoral Nerve Damage
IT Band Damage

Could be due to Friday afternoon surgery, MD was worn out from a week of knees and hips...

I had plenty of OA going into this surgery and given the Fibro dx back in 1999, which I question that syndrome.

The only PAIN I don't have since surgery is GROIN pain which is the Main reason I did this, groin showed jagged bone spurs on right groin and left groin was smooth. The groin pain is gone, good thing for that because IF I still had all that pain and all the surgery complications, I might as well put a gun to my head.
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Old 06-16-2016, 11:00 AM
 
18,827 posts, read 6,149,026 times
Reputation: 12692
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalamanderSmile View Post
My 65yo mother broker her hip while cognitively normal and came out of it with full blown "surprise" Alzheimer's due to the effects of the anesthesia. She has needed full time care for the last five years and her decline has been rapid. She was never able to recover from the surgery because she cannot follow instructions (again she was normal when she went in) and her hip is now bone in bone. We will not be having a second surgery and she will most likely be wheel chair bound for the rest of her life due to this fact. She is too frail and mentally compromised for surgery to be successful.
Sorry for your mother, 65 is young. Did she have a hip replacement? Or a repair of the hip and no replacement. It's so important to work to keep bones strong so when falls occur, they don't break. My surgery was elective due to osteoarthritis which is full blown in my body. I take a lot of bone supports and magnesium is so critical and so many don't know this. Mag deficiency is major, Vit D also.

I lose my balance and almost went down last night, backwards and it could have been ugly...my body is so off alignment. I caught myself and fell twisted on my bed. Damn damn damn
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Old 06-16-2016, 11:16 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,863 posts, read 18,892,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
I lose my balance and almost went down last night, backwards and it could have been ugly...my body is so off alignment. I caught myself and fell twisted on my bed. Damn damn damn

If one of your legs is shorter than the other now, can you wear a shoe with a thicker sole on that foot? Or an insert in your shoe to compensate for the difference in length?

Do you have nerve damage from your surgery? I've been a lot clumsier ever since I had surgery on my leg...I started stumbling a lot or tripping over little things and it turned out that it was nerve damage in my foot from the surgery. When you touch the scar on my ankle, I feel the touch across the top of my foot instead.
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