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Old 06-16-2016, 11:27 AM
 
567 posts, read 792,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinbrookNine View Post
Or ALS (the flip side of the coin). These anti-euthanasia people just think longevity is like, really it! No it isn't. When someone decides their useful enjoyable days are over, if they "Want To Die" for pete sakes let them. Why make them hang themselves from a closet door and go without one lick of dignity? Do you fools think a wall splattered with brains and blood is like, so cool? Oh yeah. It happens. But they've outlawed things like "Hemlock Club." If you didn't get your box 30 years ago, you're out of luck.


No its not a thing for physicians. It should be a sub-specialty of undertakers. And LEGAL!
You nailed it!!!
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Old 06-16-2016, 11:43 AM
 
18,775 posts, read 6,129,215 times
Reputation: 12658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
If one of your legs is shorter than the other now, can you wear a shoe with a thicker sole on that foot? Or an insert in your shoe to compensate for the difference in length?

Do you have nerve damage from your surgery? I've been a lot clumsier ever since I had surgery on my leg...I started stumbling a lot or tripping over little things and it turned out that it was nerve damage in my foot from the surgery. When you touch the scar on my ankle, I feel the touch across the top of my foot instead.
Yes, Femoral Nerve Damage, femoral nerve runs down front of thigh and very very close to surgery location from the Anterior hip replacement approach. Anterior is being done now maybe 20 yrs or so, posterior approach is the original approach. It's said, the Anterior is an easier recovery and rehab and mine was, but no mention of possible femoral nerve damage. My thigh is 80% numb and "sore"...and causes me to drag my leg. I'm told the nerves won't come back.

I have a lift in my shoe but it was found "too late" the damage to my body and knee was done since body was so off. I'm thinking of going to a new podiatrist to get new lifts... My D.O. measures and says my right side is 1/2" shorter.


And I totally agree, when I can't make it on my own, why can't I check out. California went with the right to die issue but one has to be terminal.
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Old 06-16-2016, 12:19 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,860 posts, read 18,875,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinbrookNine View Post
Or ALS (the flip side of the coin). These anti-euthanasia people just think longevity is like, really it! No it isn't. When someone decides their useful enjoyable days are over, if they "Want To Die" for pete sakes let them. Why make them hang themselves from a closet door and go without one lick of dignity? Do you fools think a wall splattered with brains and blood is like, so cool? Oh yeah. It happens. But they've outlawed things like "Hemlock Club." If you didn't get your box 30 years ago, you're out of luck.


No its not a thing for physicians. It should be a sub-specialty of undertakers. And LEGAL!
The problem with that is that someone would have to be able to consent to it. With dementia, by the time that things get really bad, the person wouldn't be able to consent. And I don't think family members could be trusted to make the decision and give consent...what happens when you don't want Grandma wasting your inheritance on assisted living, so you decide to have her euthanized, even though Grandma is only slightly senile and would probably be happy to live another ten years?
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 12,914,194 times
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I'm nowhere near her age but I have had major surgery. I had many lingering issues due to anesthesia. Immediately after surgery also had night terrors (parasomnia), something I had never experienced before. I am inclined to depression anyway but after surgery it got TERRIBLE (mental confusion, suicide ideations, lack of ability to concentrate, etc.) For a long time after surgery my hair fell out a lot. The last time my mother had major surgery she also lost a lot of hair. Her doctor said this is not uncommon and eventually it did stop for both of us.

My mother had both hip joints replaced in her eighties but it was done under the kind of anesthesia described by Anthony above. It helped with her pain, but she still cannot walk without assistance.
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Old 06-16-2016, 02:54 PM
 
696 posts, read 547,405 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
If one of your legs is shorter than the other now, can you wear a shoe with a thicker sole on that foot? Or an insert in your shoe to compensate for the difference in length?

Do you have nerve damage from your surgery? I've been a lot clumsier ever since I had surgery on my leg...I started stumbling a lot or tripping over little things and it turned out that it was nerve damage in my foot from the surgery. When you touch the scar on my ankle, I feel the touch across the top of my foot instead.
What kind of ankle surgery did you have?
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Old 06-16-2016, 04:03 PM
 
18,775 posts, read 6,129,215 times
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Thought I'd park this here. I take a lot of supplements and of course had to go off most a week before surgery. In all my reading pre surgery, I read or heard that Vit D levels can drop with surgery, maybe especially replacements, but probably all surgery. My Vit D level was a wonderful 80 and mentally I felt so good and sure enough my level dropped 40 pts as I got labs done a short time after surgery. I've been working to get my levels up but feel nothing like I did before surgery. Surgery takes so so much out of us and we don't know until we've done it.

Supplements For Surgery

Funny, the Vit D isn't mentioned in the above.
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Old 06-16-2016, 04:38 PM
 
5,644 posts, read 3,192,670 times
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My husband had both hip replacements in his mid 60's and a third correction for a first that did not work. He was still working full time, had extreme pain getting in and out of his car driving, let alone doing work around the house, golfing, bike riding, etx. Are 90 year olds doing all that that too?
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Old 06-16-2016, 04:42 PM
 
5,644 posts, read 3,192,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
The problem with that is that someone would have to be able to consent to it. With dementia, by the time that things get really bad, the person wouldn't be able to consent. And I don't think family members could be trusted to make the decision and give consent...what happens when you don't want Grandma wasting your inheritance on assisted living, so you decide to have her euthanized, even though Grandma is only slightly senile and would probably be happy to live another ten years?
Living Will LONG before extreme old age and dementia sets in. You ASSUME that Grandma WANTS to live another 10 years. Let HER spell it out for you before any senility becomes an issue.
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Old 06-16-2016, 05:15 PM
 
4,618 posts, read 10,497,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty61 View Post
Can anyone here share their experience with the elderly and recovery from surgery?

My 90 year old friend Angie had her second hip replacement surgery in Feb '16 a few months after her first. We eat together at meal times along with another friend, Joyce. We've noticed that Angie's cognitive function has deteriorated significantly, she sleeps 18 hours/day, but still has a healthy appetite.
This is a lady that is truly strong but not so much anymore. Angie uses a walker as her hips slowly heal. Her family keeps her involved and do a tremendous job helping her however they are not with her as much as Joyce and I are. Our concern is founded.

Angie used to go out and walk distances before her hips got damaged from falling.
Now she can't remember what we talked about less than a minute ago. She is always tired and sleeps all the time. We are concerned about her and want to help somehow. We are afraid it is her decline to the end.
Were these elective hip replacements or were they performed for fracture treatment?

There is a large body of evidence regarding decline of elderly patients following hip fracture and it likely has more to do with overall frailty that leads to hip fracture than the actual surgery.
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Old 06-16-2016, 05:39 PM
 
2,484 posts, read 1,725,769 times
Reputation: 4240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
The problem with that is that someone would have to be able to consent to it. With dementia, by the time that things get really bad, the person wouldn't be able to consent. And I don't think family members could be trusted to make the decision and give consent...what happens when you don't want Grandma wasting your inheritance on assisted living, so you decide to have her euthanized, even though Grandma is only slightly senile and would probably be happy to live another ten years?
Ever hear of lawyers? Directives? Before Gramma gets demented at all she quietly goes and sees a lawyer and puts together a directive. She draws it up with a legal counsel, that makes it legal. In that, she says "If I get to a point where I cannot do [this, that, or the other, etc....very specific stuff], and I am unable to do it myself, I wish to be euthanized in a painless manner that above all else maintains the dignity that I was born with, the dignity with which I lived my life, and the dignity in which I wish to die..." or something like that. No signature needed at the time of euthanasia. Of course, someone has to be aware of it and someone has to do it.


Its sort of like a "do not rescuscitate" directive but outside of a medical care scenario.


Mine would require a first rate forensic autopsy with high end toxicology just to ensure no lazy bum or undeserving spouse gets what's not intended for them. That's for the lawyer to put in legalise.


This stuff should not be confined to code blues where someone turns into a turnip and requires all this garbage before the plug is pulled.
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