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Old 06-26-2016, 03:37 PM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
2,986 posts, read 1,711,202 times
Reputation: 8914

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At my age, the Doctor of Osteopathy is certainly my best friend. I'd love to have some work done on my poor old knees, but surgery is a big step and I can't commit at this time.

I hope you know I in no way meant to hurt your feelings. Just terrible with all the new internet acronyms.
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Old 06-26-2016, 04:02 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,998 posts, read 17,150,498 times
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Mine is a regular MD and is very, very busy. I like him pretty well but I only get to see him for about 5 minutes and he's typing on a computer. I used to have doctors that were able to spend more time and were more open minded rather than going strictly by the book. That sort of thing seems to be a thing of the past--these days all their time seems to be taken up with record keeping and insurance.
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Old 06-27-2016, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,297 posts, read 79,469,982 times
Reputation: 38651
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Mine is a regular MD and is very, very busy. I like him pretty well but I only get to see him for about 5 minutes and he's typing on a computer. I used to have doctors that were able to spend more time and were more open minded rather than going strictly by the book. That sort of thing seems to be a thing of the past--these days all their time seems to be taken up with record keeping and insurance.
This is my experience as well, and I don't want to get into politics here, as there is a forum for that, but our old doctor did say the length of time they spend with us, or do not spend is directly related to Obama care. I have no idea if this is true, I do know in the past 4 or 5 years it does seem most doctors are spending less time with us. Now, on the other hand, the good news seems to be, we don't have as long a wait time.
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Old 07-17-2016, 06:00 PM
 
18,823 posts, read 6,149,026 times
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I'm seeing a new D.O. in the following week, and he has an impressive resume and I can get an xray of my knee there and they take Medicare. He offers PRP also but I can't afford it, but it will be good to at least talk to him and get another's prospective of my issues. Here is what he offers:

CliniCare Santa Monica - Adam Silver, D.O.
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Old 07-18-2016, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Hawaii
1,677 posts, read 3,611,436 times
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NPs are great (better than most PCPs IMO), but if I had a choice I would go with the DO...better trained then the regular MD who goes into family practice (PCP)...primary care physician.
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Old 07-19-2016, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Kountze, Texas
1,013 posts, read 1,097,169 times
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I just switched PCP's - I'm now living in Flagstaff during the week so I saw a new MD here yesterday. In comparison to my previous PCP she was an MD as well. This new one is hands down so much better with getting to know a new patient- he spent at least 20 minutes with me yesterday. I'm not particular between types of providers - but I go to FEPBLUE - Federal Blue Cross to look for providers in the area and pick one from there.
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Old 07-19-2016, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,694 posts, read 2,839,253 times
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Originally Posted by House4kids View Post
I just switched PCP's - I'm now living in Flagstaff during the week so I saw a new MD here yesterday. In comparison to my previous PCP she was an MD as well. This new one is hands down so much better with getting to know a new patient- he spent at least 20 minutes with me yesterday. I'm not particular between types of providers - but I go to FEPBLUE - Federal Blue Cross to look for providers in the area and pick one from there.
Yes, it's funny how a good appointment can make an impression on you like that, isn't it? When I was in Grad school, I had some minor health issues with vague symptoms and had one appointment with a Gastroenterologist. He spent an hour with me, and at one point, he wanted to know the answer to a question that pertained to my grandmother, and asked if she was still alive (which she was) and he suggested we call her from the exam room to get an answer.

As I was leaving, he put his arm around me and warmly informed me he thought there was nothing serious wrong with me. I never had to see him again, and yet, he remains my benchmark for every encounter with a physician I have ever had since.
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Old 07-21-2016, 08:39 PM
 
1,638 posts, read 2,471,757 times
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For most my life, my primary care was an MD. Through my college years I mostly saw a PA. When I had orthopedic concerns, I saw a DO.

I've had great experiences and negative experiences with all types.

For my OB visits, I see an NP. I love her and she has been my favorite thus far! I may be biased though as I'm in school to become a nurse :P.
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Old 07-22-2016, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
13,154 posts, read 7,398,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
You can thank lawyers for that. Doctors do order too many tests and referrals because there are so many frivolous lawsuits filed against them. One of the most common reasons for being sued is not referring out and for not ordering enough tests. It doesn't matter if someone has an incredibly rare disease that had an atypical presentation. The lawyers pour through the case and if they see that you didn't refer to a specialist or order specific tests, you are screwed. Doctors need protection against frivolous litigation.

Doctors don't enjoy ordering too many tests and referrals. It's more work and takes up more of their time in terms of paperwork and staff time. They would love to be honest and tell you what they think but in this age, they can't practice that way due to the current legal environment.
30 years ago, a kid who bumps his head and winds up in the ER is given Ibuprofen and sent home. Now they get a CT scan or an MRI and may even be admitted overnight for observation. Because in the rare event the kid has a subdural or epidural bleed and they missed it, they will be sued for millions.
Incorrect. As much as people want to blame lawyers for everything, this just isn't true. The reason doctors have to order so many tests is twofold: insurance company requirements and for their personal confirmation of a patient's medical condition. The insurance company will not approve X treatment for Y condition unless they have visible proof that Y condition actually exists. And it all boils down to money, not surprisingly. Y treatment costs much more than the test/scan costs which is designed to diagnose the problem, so the insurance company requires that it be done before they will pay for the treatment. Besides, technology is used to help us gain knowledge in all areas of life; why not use it to cure us of disease? We've come a long way from therapy with leeches and the theory of humors.

Consider a torn rotator cuff. The orthopedic surgeon is pretty sure the patient has a torn rotator cuff, but needs to perform an MRI to be sure, because it could be one of several conditions. The doctor needs to be sure he/she is treating the right condition, because treating a bad rotator cuff when it's actually bursitis or tendonitis might not help. And the doctor also needs to do the MRI because the insurance company won't pay for the possible treatments of A: steroid shots, B. physical therapy or C. rotator cuff surgery without the results of this test. Most doctors never get sued even once in their entire medical career, or they get sued once. If they get sued numerous times, that's a sign that they are truly incompetent.
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Old 07-22-2016, 04:28 PM
 
4,626 posts, read 10,500,588 times
Reputation: 10314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
Incorrect. As much as people want to blame lawyers for everything, this just isn't true. The reason doctors have to order so many tests is twofold: insurance company requirements and for their personal confirmation of a patient's medical condition. The insurance company will not approve X treatment for Y condition unless they have visible proof that Y condition actually exists. And it all boils down to money, not surprisingly. Y treatment costs much more than the test/scan costs which is designed to diagnose the problem, so the insurance company requires that it be done before they will pay for the treatment. Besides, technology is used to help us gain knowledge in all areas of life; why not use it to cure us of disease? We've come a long way from therapy with leeches and the theory of humors.

Consider a torn rotator cuff. The orthopedic surgeon is pretty sure the patient has a torn rotator cuff, but needs to perform an MRI to be sure, because it could be one of several conditions. The doctor needs to be sure he/she is treating the right condition, because treating a bad rotator cuff when it's actually bursitis or tendonitis might not help. And the doctor also needs to do the MRI because the insurance company won't pay for the possible treatments of A: steroid shots, B. physical therapy or C. rotator cuff surgery without the results of this test. Most doctors never get sued even once in their entire medical career, or they get sued once. If they get sued numerous times, that's a sign that they are truly incompetent.
This is incorrect and actually the opposite is more often the case....

If I want to order an MRI on a patient for a shoulder issue, in order for insurance to pay for the test, I often have to show that the patient has already gone through PT and/or had a steroid injection and failed to improve in order to justify the MRI of the shoulder...

Also while there is certainly truth to insurers driving the cost of health care due to requiring certain tests there is no denying that all of us in healthcare have to practice "defensive medicine" often getting tests that are ordered primarily as CYA maneuver...
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