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Old 06-19-2016, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,504 posts, read 26,116,900 times
Reputation: 26477

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
It doesn't matter whether the case is "mild" or not whatever that means....if you have had chicken pox you develop antibodies..."mild" or not....whether one has a "mild" case or not should also have no bearing on later developing shingles....whether "mild" or "severe" one has the virus for life and it can re activated at any time

The varicella vaccine has been around 20 years now so most "young people" have had the vaccine and it is known that immunity from the vaccine is not life long...the introduction of the vaccine and the lack of constant exposure to varicella in the population are more reasonable theories for early onset shingles
Clearly not everyone handles the chickenpox virus the same way. Some people never get shingles at all, even without constant re-exposure. This study found good protection from the vaccine at 14 years post vaccination with no evidence that it was waning at that point. If the protection was wearing off at even 20 years we would be seeing more cases of varicella in people who were vaccinated in the mid 1990s. That is not happening. The current presumption is that boosters after the two dose series will not be needed. If at some point we start seeing varicella in vaccinated people then a booster for adults can be considered.

Long-term Effectiveness of Varicella Vaccine: A 14-Year, Prospective Cohort Study | Articles | Pediatrics

The effect of re-exposure is real but does not last very long. This study found the booster effect to last about two years, as opposed to twenty years as previously thought. The age group at increased risk of shingles during the era of vaccination for chickenpox was found to be those in their thirties.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0811103555.htm

One option, of course, would be to lower the age at which the zoster vaccine is administered. However, that might not be cost effective because even if the relative risk is increased in that age group the absolute risk is still low.
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Old 06-19-2016, 06:29 PM
 
4,627 posts, read 10,504,468 times
Reputation: 10319
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Clearly not everyone handles the chickenpox virus the same way. Some people never get shingles at all, even without constant re-exposure. This study found good protection from the vaccine at 14 years post vaccination with no evidence that it was waning at that point. If the protection was wearing off at even 20 years we would be seeing more cases of varicella in people who were vaccinated in the mid 1990s. That is not happening. The current presumption is that boosters after the two dose series will not be needed. If at some point we start seeing varicella in vaccinated people then a booster for adults can be considered.

Long-term Effectiveness of Varicella Vaccine: A 14-Year, Prospective Cohort Study | Articles | Pediatrics

The effect of re-exposure is real but does not last very long. This study found the booster effect to last about two years, as opposed to twenty years as previously thought. The age group at increased risk of shingles during the era of vaccination for chickenpox was found to be those in their thirties.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0811103555.htm

One option, of course, would be to lower the age at which the zoster vaccine is administered. However, that might not be cost effective because even if the relative risk is increased in that age group the absolute risk is still low.
Yeah I worded my response wrong it was supposed to read "it is not known if immunity is life long from the varicella vaccine" seeing as there is only about 20 years of data but all data currently points to it lasting that long and likely longer, hopefully life long immunity
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Old 06-21-2016, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,504 posts, read 26,116,900 times
Reputation: 26477
OP, how are you doing?
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