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Old 03-22-2017, 07:06 AM
 
1,930 posts, read 2,084,778 times
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I've had melanoma.

Never once during any exam was a black light or magnifying lens used. You are the best person to spot skin changes. Take pictures of anything that concerns you. If something changes go in for an exam. You can have someone at home help look you over.
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Old 03-22-2017, 10:04 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
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My experience is the same as most of you report...my exam seems very cursory. The thing is, if I could see every square inch of my body, then I could report a spot of concern, but I can't.
Those dermatologists can probably see a suspicious spot at 20 paces, so I just accept it.
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Old 03-22-2017, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
My experience is the same as most of you report...my exam seems very cursory. The thing is, if I could see every square inch of my body, then I could report a spot of concern, but I can't.
Those dermatologists can probably see a suspicious spot at 20 paces, so I just accept it.
"Only Derm knows Derm"....that's what Mr. Texas Ag, who is a surgeon, told me a few months ago when our 9 year old had a skin condition. I took her to the Dermatologist and she saw a Chief Resident, who (while still in the process of walking in the door), took one glance at it and diagnosed it.

I had my first skin exam about a month ago. I also got just a very quick look over (which did include my scalp) and the Dermatologist noted several moles, skin tags and other spots he was unconcerned about. There was one spot on my face he was suspicious of (as was I) and it turned out to be a superficial squamous cell carcinoma, which I had removed 3 weeks ago.
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Old 10-11-2017, 06:58 AM
 
2,379 posts, read 747,830 times
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A couple questions for folks here who have had full skin exams. I've never had one before but have just had one scheduled with a 2nd Year Resident. With him will be a scribe and a nurse. I understand that the scribe will be taking notes for the doctor. I get that part. What is the nurse there for?

The other thing is why do dermatology practices only hire female nurses and scribes? Where I am going is a very large practice at a big teaching hospital. There are 14 dermatologists (10 female) plus 9 residents, so a pretty big operation. The nursing and scribe ranks are 100% female. I learned that when I asked to be scheduled with male staff. The female scheduler was a bit hostile to my having asked the question and didn't give me an answer other than they only have female nurses and scribes. There was no empathy in the form of "I understand your concern but...".

I am perfectly comfortable with the doctor doing the exam but as you have likely surmised I am uncomfortable with having two women in the room observing. Why women who would never allow a man to do their mammogram, who generally do not want male nursing & tech staff in L&D, who generally do not allow men to do their vaginal ultrasounds etc don't understand that men might be modest too is a mystery to me.
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Old 10-11-2017, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
26,789 posts, read 17,234,614 times
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I have no idea, nor do I care.

My derm is male and I am female. He has done a full body scan on me. His gender is not my concern, the fact that he is a very good dermatologist is my only requirement.

I have had a lifetime of medical problems and what gender someone is has never concerned me.

My gyno is male, and really, that's pretty up close and personal. Mammo? Why in the world would I care the gender?

Never thought about it but ALL of my doctor's are male, except my GP. Ironically, she is the only one who hasn't seen me naked.
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Old 10-11-2017, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Texas
3,647 posts, read 2,757,615 times
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Originally Posted by Biker53 View Post
A couple questions for folks here who have had full skin exams. I've never had one before but have just had one scheduled with a 2nd Year Resident. With him will be a scribe and a nurse. I understand that the scribe will be taking notes for the doctor. I get that part. What is the nurse there for?

The nurse is there to assist during the exam. If and when the physician sees something suspicious, he will likely want to biopsy it. The nurse will be the one getting the equipment for him, preparing the slide etc. Could the physician do this himself? Possibly. Doesn't hurt to ask, but bear in mind, he only has so many hands and doing things himself only slows things down.

The other thing is why do dermatology practices only hire female nurses and scribes?

Approximately 80% of all non physicians who work in health care are female and the overwhelming majority of the 20% of males that work in healthcare (as non physicians) work in an inpatient setting. That's just the reality of the situation.

I am perfectly comfortable with the doctor doing the exam but as you have likely surmised I am uncomfortable with having two women in the room observing. Why women who would never allow a man to do their mammogram, who generally do not want male nursing & tech staff in L&D, who generally do not allow men to do their vaginal ultrasounds etc don't understand that men might be modest too is a mystery to me.


Yes, based on your previous posts, we have surmised that. Your examples above are apples and oranges. Mammography and trans vaginal US are intimate, arguably invasive, procedures. During your Derm exam, at most, the females present may see you completely naked. And even that can be avoided with some creative draping done by the Dermatologist, which they are pretty adept at doing. At my exam, I was completely naked and completely removed my gown (both at my request) to allow the Dermatologist (who was a male) the best and easiest view. I couldn't have cared less.

Although I think you are overly sensitive to this modesty issue, I will say, however, that all of your posts on this have made some good points, and caused me to think slightly differently about this entire issue. I do agree with you that females are generally given more consideration in regards to desire for modesty than males are.
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Old 10-11-2017, 08:58 AM
 
5,218 posts, read 3,227,642 times
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I found a waxy bump on the back of my ankle and said, "That's weird." I kept an eye on it and when I noticed it spontaneously bleeding one day, I went to my PCP. He said he didn't think it was anything but biopsied it anyway. It was SCC.

That one experience -- just happening to see something on the back of an ankle, an area I don't normally look at, and my PCP thinking it was harmless -- has framed my thinking about skin exams ever since. I don't assume the dermatologist is being thorough. I have my husband look over the places I can't see and I do the same for him.
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Old 10-11-2017, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Central IL
12,976 posts, read 6,868,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biker53 View Post
A couple questions for folks here who have had full skin exams. I've never had one before but have just had one scheduled with a 2nd Year Resident. With him will be a scribe and a nurse. I understand that the scribe will be taking notes for the doctor. I get that part. What is the nurse there for?

The other thing is why do dermatology practices only hire female nurses and scribes? Where I am going is a very large practice at a big teaching hospital. There are 14 dermatologists (10 female) plus 9 residents, so a pretty big operation. The nursing and scribe ranks are 100% female. I learned that when I asked to be scheduled with male staff. The female scheduler was a bit hostile to my having asked the question and didn't give me an answer other than they only have female nurses and scribes. There was no empathy in the form of "I understand your concern but...".

I am perfectly comfortable with the doctor doing the exam but as you have likely surmised I am uncomfortable with having two women in the room observing. Why women who would never allow a man to do their mammogram, who generally do not want male nursing & tech staff in L&D, who generally do not allow men to do their vaginal ultrasounds etc don't understand that men might be modest too is a mystery to me.
If all the scribes are female my guess is that the pay is so low that males don't go into that area. Men typically express less concern (whether they actually are less concerned or just don't speak up, who knows) and with a shortage of male "witnesses" doctors probably don't go out of their way to proactively ask/provide someone for male patients. The more people in the room with you the more time you're paying for.
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Old 10-11-2017, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
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My husband just had one, and he had to show the young, female doctor something on his sack.

He said he felt really bad for her.
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Old 10-11-2017, 05:02 PM
Status: "AlaskaVet" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Alaska
187 posts, read 75,418 times
Reputation: 681
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biker53 View Post
A couple questions for folks here who have had full skin exams. I've never had one before but have just had one scheduled with a 2nd Year Resident. With him will be a scribe and a nurse. I understand that the scribe will be taking notes for the doctor. I get that part. What is the nurse there for?

The other thing is why do dermatology practices only hire female nurses and scribes? Where I am going is a very large practice at a big teaching hospital. There are 14 dermatologists (10 female) plus 9 residents, so a pretty big operation. The nursing and scribe ranks are 100% female. I learned that when I asked to be scheduled with male staff. The female scheduler was a bit hostile to my having asked the question and didn't give me an answer other than they only have female nurses and scribes. There was no empathy in the form of "I understand your concern but...".

I am perfectly comfortable with the doctor doing the exam but as you have likely surmised I am uncomfortable with having two women in the room observing. Why women who would never allow a man to do their mammogram, who generally do not want male nursing & tech staff in L&D, who generally do not allow men to do their vaginal ultrasounds etc don't understand that men might be modest too is a mystery to me.

Its probably appropriate to have a chaperone (for the Drs protection as well as yours)in the room for this exam and maybe the scribe doesn't count. It is definitely OK for you to ask for a male chaperone and to let them know you would prefer not to have any unnecessary staff in the room.
I'll concur with the previous posts you will probably drop the gown but still have your shorts on and it will be a lot less of an exam then you think ie quick and cursory.
Actually with a resident you will probably get a longer more thorough exam.

Last edited by royalabran; 10-11-2017 at 05:05 PM.. Reason: correction
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