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Old 08-23-2016, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,376 posts, read 2,424,586 times
Reputation: 7736

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Right eye at age 42 in 1976. Implants were new, would not do one on me. They kept me 2 nights in hospital.
Had implant in right eye in1991. Huge improvement.
Left eye in 1997, went in in morning, was home for lunch. Piece of cake.

Process has improved enormously over the years.
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Old 08-23-2016, 04:27 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
6,810 posts, read 14,586,342 times
Reputation: 8821
Quote:
Originally Posted by FiveLoaves View Post
I'm curious to hear more about those ethosheaven eye drops. By Perscription ?? OTC ???

My problem seems to be the "floaters" which I'm told is the retinal fluid turning to a liquid of thinner consistency and not really operable. I don't think cataracts are my major problem. I want to avoid the operation, but the doctors these days seem to want to fill their Surgery Day with appointments. Must be a lucrative profit margin.
There are some treatments for floaters (laser vitreolysis, vitrectomy). In general, the outcomes are unreliable, so they are frequently only used when floaters become VERY bad.

I have vitreous detachment due, in part, to cornea transplants and mine can be pretty bad and laser vitreolysis is likely in my future. It can't be as bad as the DMEK cornea transplants I had ($45,000 per eye, including a cataract lens replacement plus 5 days of pretty much staying flat on your back in bed with your head still and your eyes closed).


As far as the eye drops, they are N-Acetylcarnosine plus additives. There are a limited numbers of actual medical trials you can find reference to.

you can look up the various brands on Amazon and see the very mixed reviews. My main concern would be the quality and sterility of the solution. Having had a serious eye infection, they are not simple to treat.

https://smile.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb...arnosine+drops
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Old 08-23-2016, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Central IL
13,349 posts, read 7,121,412 times
Reputation: 31038
Quote:
Originally Posted by grampaTom View Post
Let's Talk About Cataracts

1) everyone gets them
2) not everyone has symptoms from them
3) they are slow growing so your eye care specialist will have plenty of time to advise you on treatment needs
4) the treatment is, indeed, surgical but does not require overnight hospital stay
5) some medications make them worse (steroids)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Not everyone gets them. The prevalence is highly dependent on age. For those living to their 80s, the prevalence is about 65%.


Typically there would not be cataract surgery unless the vision is affected. The usual symptoms include blurry vision, poor night vision, halos, frequent changes in prescriptions.


Most are slow growing but sometimes the onset is rapid. I went from clear vision and a thorough eye exam to horrible blurry vision within a few months. I had a secondary, capsular cataract that went from unnoticeable to extremely poor blurry vision within a few weeks.
Qualify the statement that everyone gets them by saying "practically everyone will get them if they live long enough".
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Old 08-23-2016, 04:53 PM
 
2,702 posts, read 3,434,261 times
Reputation: 4514
There are basically 7 types of Cataracts and NOT everyone has them or gets them.....

Congenital Cataracts are the type people are born with... I had these and had lens implants in the early 90's... My oldest sister had them as well as did my mom and grandmother.. My youngest sister had and has perfect vision....

The difference before and after my implants was like night and day only 100 times...

And now my vision is 20/10 in each eye where as before it was 20/200....
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Old 08-23-2016, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
18,847 posts, read 12,465,112 times
Reputation: 24265
Both DH and I have had cataract surgery. Mine were diagnosed about 3 years before I was told I needed surgery. My mother had cataracts, but hers were not diagnosed until much later in her life.

Cataract surgery is not horrible. Recovery is quick. Experienced surgeons have done these many, many times and they are very good. My surgery was done with a laser, and it was an interesting experience. How long it takes to perform the surgery seems to depend on how bad the cataracts are, in my experience. I was lucky to have mine done in an amazing, quiet office, with supportive staff and full explanations. My DH waited in the prep room with me, and until I went in for my surgery. It was so encouraging to see others walk out of the operating room and hear them say, "That's all there was to it?" or "That was over so quick!"

With my first cataract, I experienced a bit of discomfort, and I saw an incredibly bright light. It was so amazing, I looked forward to seeing it again, but alas, I only saw a very brief pinkish light over to the side of my eye the second time. It wasn't the same.

My recovery was uneventful and my sight is greatly improved. I retained my nearsightedness. I sometimes I wish I had had them correct for farsightedness. At any rate, I had a good experience.
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Old 08-23-2016, 07:44 PM
 
Location: City of the Angels
2,223 posts, read 1,521,436 times
Reputation: 5363
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
There are some treatments for floaters (laser vitreolysis, vitrectomy). In general, the outcomes are unreliable, so they are frequently only used when floaters become VERY bad.

I have vitreous detachment due, in part, to cornea transplants and mine can be pretty bad and laser vitreolysis is likely in my future. It can't be as bad as the DMEK cornea transplants I had ($45,000 per eye, including a cataract lens replacement plus 5 days of pretty much staying flat on your back in bed with your head still and your eyes closed).


As far as the eye drops, they are N-Acetylcarnosine plus additives. There are a limited numbers of actual medical trials you can find reference to.

you can look up the various brands on Amazon and see the very mixed reviews. My main concern would be the quality and sterility of the solution. Having had a serious eye infection, they are not simple to treat.

https://smile.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb...arnosine+drops







Here's a place on line that you can buy them.
$24.95 Carnosine Cataract Eyedrops from Vision Clarity - A Step Above Can C, Visual Ocuity, Can-C, and the Others


Reference: Eliminate Cataracts Without Surgery


I've been using Vision Clarity for about 4 months now and have noticed a big improvement in my vision. I still have some floaters in both eyes and am going to do their recommended 6 month therapy to see how much it clears up and then go back to the doctor to have them see how much has changed since the last time I went in.
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Old 08-23-2016, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
1,024 posts, read 406,411 times
Reputation: 868
I had cataract surgery done on both eyes in my early 50s. I thought I was the exception. But my co-worker who is younger than I also had the same problem.

The reason is because I live in Hawaii. The UV is too strong.

Cataract is not so scary. Retinal detachment is definitely scary. Two years after I had my cataract surgery and three months after my annual eye exam which showed everything was okay, during my trip to NYC suddenly one eye lost vision when I watched a Broadway show. I was not aware of it until I went to visit an eye doctor in NJ (which is a pain in axx to make an appointment for non-scheduled visit as a new patient).

The eye surgeon detected the problem and referred me to see a retinal specialist right away. The retinal specialist offered me two options: (1) Do the surgery in NJ but cannot fly for one month, otherwise my eye will explode and become blind permanently. (2) Make an appointment on behalf of me with the best retinal specialist in Honolulu and do the surgery after I fly back.

But I was on a family trip and still had one week to go before my trip was over. Moreover, it was summer time and it was prohibitively expensive to rebook all our family's air tickets. The NJ retinal specialist said that the surgery could be pending for 10 days. He also said that according to NJ law, it is okay to drive with one eye. So I picked the second option.

Then I continued my trip to Niagara Fall. In the middle of the way, it rained dogs and cats. The problem with one eye driving is I can't tell the spatial distance, i.e. exactly how far is my car behind the car in front. So I drove most of the time @ 45 mph on the slow lane.

When I came back to Honolulu, I had the surgery two days afterwards. It was a SEVEN hour surgery (cataract surgery lasted 20 minutes). Fortunately I retained 90% of my vision. The retinal specialist in Honolulu told me that in many cases, the patient will lose half or even more of their vision after the surgery. I am one of the lucky few.

Last edited by Ian_Lee; 08-23-2016 at 08:22 PM..
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Old 08-23-2016, 09:15 PM
 
3,270 posts, read 1,941,217 times
Reputation: 6248
I already know I will need cataract surgery before I am 60. Cataracts popped up on my radar about a year ago. Left eye is getting worse quickly. A friend of mine also had cataract surgery in his 50s.
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Old 08-23-2016, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,718 posts, read 20,456,636 times
Reputation: 30701
Funny I found this thread. I just had a pre-op appointment this morning for my cataract surgery on the 1st.

I've always had bad eyesight, but when I realized something just wasn't right, was when I went to get a new eye glasses prescription last year. It had been quite a few years since my last eye exam. So, I figured I just needed new glasses. My vision just wasn't as clear in one eye.

Optometrist gave me my new prescription and after a few days, I realized the vision was still not very clear in my left eye. Went back, and the optometrist told me basically, that I'm just getting old and that's as good as it gets.

After about 9 months and the vision getting more and more blurry, I asked my primary care doctor for a referral to an opthalmologist to see what was going on. I was afraid it was due to diabetes, even though I'm just pre-diabetic, not actually diabetic.

Go see the ophthalmologist and he finds a really big cataract in my left eye. He said it's so bad he wanted to know if I've ever been injured in that eye. I said, no, I've been in car wrecks where I've hurt my head and gotten bad neck whiplash, but no trauma to the eye. Anyway, that's how bad the cataract is.

I'm so mad at that optometrist. He should have sent me to a specialist to see what was wrong and not just tell me I'm getting old and should accept blurry vision! Grrrr.

So, surgery is on the 1st. The surgeon told me he will also be able to correct my vision during the procedure, and it won't cost me anything because I'm already approved for the cataract surgery. He said, basically, it's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, as I couldn't afford to get corrective surgery just to improve my eyesight and my insurance wouldn't cover it.

He says he can get my vision in that eye to be what it was when I was 20 years old, and I probably won't need glasses - just a contact lens in my right eye. He also said that at some point I'll probably need surgery in the right eye, too, as there is a small cataract in that eye, too, but my vision is still good in that eye. I'll come back and report on the success of my upcoming surgery. Wish me luck!

I turned 60 this year.
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Old 08-23-2016, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,755 posts, read 23,217,198 times
Reputation: 6087
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian_Lee View Post
I had cataract surgery done on both eyes in my early 50s. I thought I was the exception. But my co-worker who is younger than I also had the same problem.

The reason is because I live in Hawaii. The UV is too strong.

Cataract is not so scary. Retinal detachment is definitely scary. Two years after I had my cataract surgery and three months after my annual eye exam which showed everything was okay, during my trip to NYC suddenly one eye lost vision when I watched a Broadway show. I was not aware of it until I went to visit an eye doctor in NJ (which is a pain in axx to make an appointment for non-scheduled visit as a new patient).

The eye surgeon detected the problem and referred me to see a retinal specialist right away. The retinal specialist offered me two options: (1) Do the surgery in NJ but cannot fly for one month, otherwise my eye will explode and become blind permanently. (2) Make an appointment on behalf of me with the best retinal specialist in Honolulu and do the surgery after I fly back.

But I was on a family trip and still had one week to go before my trip was over. Moreover, it was summer time and it was prohibitively expensive to rebook all our family's air tickets. The NJ retinal specialist said that the surgery could be pending for 10 days. He also said that according to NJ law, it is okay to drive with one eye. So I picked the second option.

Then I continued my trip to Niagara Fall. In the middle of the way, it rained dogs and cats. The problem with one eye driving is I can't tell the spatial distance, i.e. exactly how far is my car behind the car in front. So I drove most of the time @ 45 mph on the slow lane.

When I came back to Honolulu, I had the surgery two days afterwards. It was a SEVEN hour surgery (cataract surgery lasted 20 minutes). Fortunately I retained 90% of my vision. The retinal specialist in Honolulu told me that in many cases, the patient will lose half or even more of their vision after the surgery. I am one of the lucky few.
Yeah, cataract surgery is pretty quick, with a one day recovery time. Retina is a whole different issue. Like you, last year I had a sudden retina event, ended up being a tear with a partial detachment. I had surgery about an hour after they discovered it, and the surgery and recovery is far more extensive than cataracts.

Subsequent eye exam shows about 90% recovery, but my vision is slightly darker in that eye and I have a small "dead spot" where I apparently don't see things.
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