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Old 08-24-2016, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Cochise County, AZ
1,067 posts, read 693,256 times
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Thanks for all who have shared their experiences and facts.
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Old 08-24-2016, 09:47 AM
 
Location: California
4,445 posts, read 5,175,063 times
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Last Winter I had my eyes rechecked as it seemed my vision was getting worse. So, yes I am still qualified for surgery but however, by Spring my vision seemed to improve considerably. I knew to turn on brighter lights at home to read but it is time the have the surgery when the seasonal outside daylight makes a difference in how well you can read street signs.
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Old 08-24-2016, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Kronenwetter
176 posts, read 92,374 times
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I had a detached retina last year. One of the side effects of that surgery is you will develop a cataract. I am scheduled on Sept 16th for that surgery. I can't wait because I am sick of the "halo" effect when I drive at night. It is same day surgery and I will be back at work on Monday. Much easier then detached retina, face down for a week was not fun.
I am 61 and my younger sister had cataract surgery in July.
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Old 08-24-2016, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
1,024 posts, read 408,350 times
Reputation: 868
If you are scheduled to have cataract surgery soon, your ophthalmologist may offer you option for multi-focal lens as replacement but you have to pay extra couple thousands of dollars because it is not covered by insurance during the pre-surgery consultation.

The multi-focal lens is supposedly one stop solution for all problems. You neither need a pair of glass for driving nor for reading anymore.

Both my co-worker and my sister chose the multi-focal lens. Both have serious problems after the surgery. My sister even had to do another surgery to replace the multi-focal with mono-focal because she could neither drive nor read with the multi-focal lens on.
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Old 08-24-2016, 01:20 PM
 
4,247 posts, read 5,755,791 times
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I was in my 50s. I noticed that I had to clean my glasses often only they weren't dirty. Piece of cake! Easiest surgery ever with immediate recovery. I rode my bike later that evening. Love that I no longer need to wear glasses!
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Old 08-24-2016, 01:31 PM
 
4,220 posts, read 4,441,686 times
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I had a co-worker whose mother went blind in one eye that was done. I guess it is a possibility. She's not happy certainly.


Another co-worker's husband was in his mid 40's and had his done and some weird thing happened to one of his eyes and after 2 years of testing for all kinds of possibilities, autoimmune this or that, he ended up losing the eye.


I will need my eyes done but these stories don't help.
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Old 08-24-2016, 01:55 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,423 posts, read 16,699,470 times
Reputation: 16435
Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
I had a co-worker whose mother went blind in one eye that was done. I guess it is a possibility. She's not happy certainly.


Another co-worker's husband was in his mid 40's and had his done and some weird thing happened to one of his eyes and after 2 years of testing for all kinds of possibilities, autoimmune this or that, he ended up losing the eye.


I will need my eyes done but these stories don't help.

Before I had the catarac surgery, which had one wobble with my right eye not 'closing' but it doesn't effect the very clear vision, I could barely read print and could not read signs outside. I was nervous, but considered the risk worth it, as the actual situation was already unacceptable. I really wish I'd been able to do it *sooner*. I don't get headaches from focusing problems now. I don't have to guess at words. I don't have to go the big letters on the computer. I can read normally.

The vast vast majority of people have no problems. So the chance you take may be minimal. But compare it with the problems. I had lasik too, and this is way easier than that. Balance the ways your life could be better with good vision over letting the bad fears rule. Make your decision based on the real options you have, as an individual and don't let fears of what happened to someone else rule.

When I had lasik, it was amazing since I pretty much didn't have distance vision. But it changed and developed big glows around things, and other problems. Some still persist. When I had my catarac surgery it was even better because the clarity was so good.
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Old 08-24-2016, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
4,035 posts, read 3,272,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deelighted View Post
[*]At what age did you notice symptoms?[*]What was your first symptom?[*]What kind of cataracts did you develop?[*]Did you have surgery? If so, at what age did you have surgery?[*]Did you wish you had cataract surgery earlier in life?[/list]
1. An ophthalmologist first noticed them when I was in my thirties. They became a problem when I was in my forties, and I had them out then. My ophthalmologist said he had treated folks for them as early as their thirties.

2. Harder to see at night, I was concerned about driving which is what forced me to get surgery

3. He said they were a type that happens earlier in life, they were like a frosting on the back of the lenses. The cataracts that happen later (senile cataracts) are more of a dimming throughout the lens, as I recall.

4. Had surgery in my mid forties. He did one eye, followed by laser surgery to open holes in the membrane behind the artificial lens, then a few months later the other eye.

5. I didn't need cataract surgery earlier in life.

Post-op, I went to the bookstore with my sister but was very fatigued from the anesthesia. I went back to work a day later, but I work on the computer and found it gave me one hell of a headache so I ended up taking off a week from work,
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Old 08-24-2016, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,635 posts, read 17,165,137 times
Reputation: 6685
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I was told about three years ago that I had the beginnings of the beginnings of cataracts. This year they told me that I actually did have cataracts.

I had one eye done in March and the results were not that great. But I had been extremely near sighted with astigmatism. I came out better than I was before but still with astigmatism. Before I had the surgery I asked the surgeon if I could get the toric lenses that would correct for astigmatism but he said no--my astigmatism wasn't bad enough. ???????

I had the second eye done in mid July. He obtained much better results with that eye. All I needed were cheap drug store glasses for close up. But in a room with the lights on or outside with streetlights, I saw starbursts and rays of light--from the astigmatism.

Today I picked up my new glasses with astigmatism correction and progressive lenses.

This was at age 71. I don't think you can have cataract surgery until you need it. My symptoms were blurry vision that glasses wouldn't have corrected and (although I didn't know it) things that were white looked beige. WOW. The world is very bright now.
That is too bad about the toric lenses/astigmatism in your case. We've heard good things about them.

My husband and I were first diagnosed with the beginnings of cataracts about 10 years ago give or take. When we were in our late 50's. My husband is 71 now. His opthalmologist has recommended surgery - and we've scheduled the first eye in early October. The second will be done about 3 months later.

There have been great advances in lens implants in recent years. Although it's certainly a case of "one size doesn't fit all". And there are quite a few options:

Cataract Surgery Intraocular Lens Choices

In my husband's case - the opthalmologist is recommending the toric lenses that correct both astigmatism and near-sightedness. My husband has already had a bunch of eye tests and will have a final round of tests/measurements before the surgery (so the opthalmologist might change his mind about the lens recommendation). Note that my husband has had optic neuritis (as a result of his MS) - so his eyes weren't exactly "normal" before the cataracts. In all cases - I would recommend finding an opthalmologist that you trust - and following his/her recommendations.

For people on Medicare - Medicare covers basic cataract surgery and a monofocal lens (described in the link above). This is all most insurance companies cover as well. But - if someone currently has pre-Medicare insurance - and is close to Medicare/cataract surgery - it never hurts to check the pre-Medicare insurance coverage. My husband's surgery will cost about $2700 out of pocket for each eye. For the premium lens/the laser surgery/etc. (we checked out a couple of well-respected local providers - and that seems to be the going rate here - the mileage of people in other geographical areas might vary). My father had cataract surgery/a premium lens implant about 8 years ago here. When he was 90. And that cost a touch less than $2k/eye IIRC. So the price has gone up - but not a huge amount (like some other medical things). And my father's vision post-surgery was almost perfect (he just needs some cheap reading glasses for small print).

My husband is really looking forward to his surgery - and being able to see better . Robyn
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Old 08-24-2016, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,635 posts, read 17,165,137 times
Reputation: 6685
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
False. Everyone gets them if they live long enough. The only thing that prevents them is premature death, and for most people, that's not a desirable alternative. And vision eventually is affected negatively if a person has them for awhile. Source: I'm an an ophthalmic technician.

So no, OP, cataracts are not hereditary. They are usually age related. They can be accelerated by medication. In rare cases, babies can be born with them, and they can also be caused by trauma, like being hit in the eye very hard (ballplayers get them this way occasionally).
In addition - we've heard that the development of cataracts can be speeded up if you spend a lot of time in the sun (like most of us who live in Florida do). Don't know if that's true or not. Robyn
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