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Old 08-25-2016, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,479 posts, read 2,532,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellise View Post
My surgery-phobic husband tried them on his cataracts, they did not work at all.
My wife is surgery phobic. Its so easy that even she was not concerned at all. Going to the dentist is way more stressful.

And now my wife is partly bionic: Lindsey Wagner, here she comes.
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Old 08-25-2016, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,349 posts, read 7,115,490 times
Reputation: 31038
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Funny I found this thread. I just had a pre-op appointment this morning for my cataract surgery on the 1st.

I've always had bad eyesight, but when I realized something just wasn't right, was when I went to get a new eye glasses prescription last year. It had been quite a few years since my last eye exam. So, I figured I just needed new glasses. My vision just wasn't as clear in one eye.

Optometrist gave me my new prescription and after a few days, I realized the vision was still not very clear in my left eye. Went back, and the optometrist told me basically, that I'm just getting old and that's as good as it gets.

After about 9 months and the vision getting more and more blurry, I asked my primary care doctor for a referral to an opthalmologist to see what was going on. I was afraid it was due to diabetes, even though I'm just pre-diabetic, not actually diabetic.

Go see the ophthalmologist and he finds a really big cataract in my left eye. He said it's so bad he wanted to know if I've ever been injured in that eye. I said, no, I've been in car wrecks where I've hurt my head and gotten bad neck whiplash, but no trauma to the eye. Anyway, that's how bad the cataract is.

I'm so mad at that optometrist. He should have sent me to a specialist to see what was wrong and not just tell me I'm getting old and should accept blurry vision! Grrrr.

So, surgery is on the 1st. The surgeon told me he will also be able to correct my vision during the procedure, and it won't cost me anything because I'm already approved for the cataract surgery. He said, basically, it's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, as I couldn't afford to get corrective surgery just to improve my eyesight and my insurance wouldn't cover it.

He says he can get my vision in that eye to be what it was when I was 20 years old, and I probably won't need glasses - just a contact lens in my right eye. He also said that at some point I'll probably need surgery in the right eye, too, as there is a small cataract in that eye, too, but my vision is still good in that eye. I'll come back and report on the success of my upcoming surgery. Wish me luck!

I turned 60 this year.
I know ophthalmologists are expensive and I've been lucky to have insurance. I've always needed to go because I'm quite near-sighted, am close to having double-vision due to loose muscles around my eyes, and also have thyroid issues. I think once you get to a certain age, you really need to go to someone skilled in actual eye disease and not just get measured for glasses. Optometrists SHOULD be looking for things but obviously don't have the training to fully evaluate you. You just CANNOT take the chance of losing your vision!
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Old 08-25-2016, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
1,204 posts, read 621,964 times
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Can we get a summation of this thread to date.......

Is the cataract surgery painless ?? I'm not sure I'm going to be able to lay still while someone sticks a scalpel in my eye.

Is the Surgery successful 90 % ?? 70% ?? 50% of the time ?? Do your eyes regress after a few years ??

The Russian Eye-Drop Solution ?? I already use Russian Eye Meds.....called Stolichnaya, administered with orange or cranberry juice. It doesn't really help the vision but it's good none the less.
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Old 08-25-2016, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
4,031 posts, read 3,263,876 times
Reputation: 7390
Quote:
Originally Posted by FiveLoaves View Post
Can we get a summation of this thread to date.......

Is the cataract surgery painless ?? I'm not sure I'm going to be able to lay still while someone sticks a scalpel in my eye.
They put you in twilight sleep, and you don't remember any or most of it. I woke up (sort of) toward the end of my second surgery, then went out again, and can verify it was completely painless. They put a weighted blanket thing on you to keep you from moving around. Afterward, there was a bit of itching (felt like itching from allergies) and I had to wear a cup on my eye to protect it. That's about it.

If you have concerns, be sure to talk to your ophthalmologist about them.

Quote:
Is the Surgery successful 90 % ?? 70% ?? 50% of the time ?? Do your eyes regress after a few years ??
They take out the lens and insert a plastic artificial one. He left the membrane behind the lens and said that the membrane typically clouds up over time, so a few weeks after surgery I went in for laser surgery to punch holes in the membrane. That involves a few eyedrops, sitting in a chair while the doctor positions the laser and there are a few clicks activating the laser. You feel exactly nothing. He said people sometimes have this later on, but most people will experience some clouding of the membranes eventually. Having the laser surgery right after means I don't have to worry about it later on. That was over 20 years ago, and my eyes are fine.

I had a lot of floaters for a couple years after surgery, but was told those are normal. I haven't had floaters for years.

There's no "regression" because it's not like lasik surgery - they're actually removing the lens and replacing it. There can be complications, but my understanding is that they're rare. My doctor said that any surgery on your eye changes its structure and as a result your chances of retinal detachment are higher than in the normal population so you have to be aware of that. I get my retina scanned every year or two by my optometrist to make sure everything's all right.
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Old 08-25-2016, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Georgia
4,514 posts, read 3,772,562 times
Reputation: 15511
  1. At what age did you notice symptoms? - First noticed the night vision going around age 56/57, doctor noted the beginnings of a cataract, but wanted to keep an eye on it.
  2. What was your first symptom? - Night driving, then more and more difficulty with computer screens, reading, etc. I ended up going to the doctor for a new prescription, only to discover that the cataract had developed quickly and was the culprit for the lack of crispness in my reading.
  3. What kind of cataracts did you develop? - Nuclear cataracts -- but oddly, it developed from the outside in, instead of from the inside out.
  4. Did you have surgery? If so, at what age did you have surgery? - Yes, in March 2016 at age 59. WOW! I wasn't a candidate for the multifocal lens, because of a condition I have with my cornea, called Fuchs distrophy.
  5. Did you wish you had cataract surgery earlier in life? - No, didn't need it, then. But I'm very glad I didn't wait until it got "worse", because the difference in the vision has been dramatic.
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Old 08-25-2016, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Georgia
4,514 posts, read 3,772,562 times
Reputation: 15511
Quote:
Originally Posted by FiveLoaves View Post
Can we get a summation of this thread to date.......

Is the cataract surgery painless ?? I'm not sure I'm going to be able to lay still while someone sticks a scalpel in my eye.

Is the Surgery successful 90 % ?? 70% ?? 50% of the time ?? Do your eyes regress after a few years ??

The Russian Eye-Drop Solution ?? I already use Russian Eye Meds.....called Stolichnaya, administered with orange or cranberry juice. It doesn't really help the vision but it's good none the less.

Oh, you'll lie still :-) I was given a very light sedative, and then a tranquilizer similar to what is given to someone getting a colonoscopy. I was aware during the surgery, and could tell that one lens was removed and the other inserted, but it was from a distance, more of an "oh, that's interesting . . ." but I had no inclination to fight it. You are lying down on a table, you aren't sitting up in a chair. (The chair I was in for the pre-op procedures was pretty cool, it turned into the table. :-)

My doctor used a medicine that was inserted into the lens area that meant I didn't have to fool with eye drops several times a day. THAT was so convenient. Really, the next day after surgery, I was fine -- anesthesia tends to knock me out for the day, so I took a little nap when I got home, and was at work the next day. On the second one, I drove 500 miles two days after the surgery. No sweat.
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Old 08-25-2016, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
13,139 posts, read 7,387,994 times
Reputation: 27254
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
I know ophthalmologists are expensive and I've been lucky to have insurance. I've always needed to go because I'm quite near-sighted, am close to having double-vision due to loose muscles around my eyes, and also have thyroid issues. I think once you get to a certain age, you really need to go to someone skilled in actual eye disease and not just get measured for glasses. Optometrists SHOULD be looking for things but obviously don't have the training to fully evaluate you. You just CANNOT take the chance of losing your vision!
That's utter nonsense. Optometrists have both the skills and training to detect eye diseases; that's one of the big reasons they require their patients to come in annually for an eye exam. Eye exams are not just about getting your glasses and contact lenses refilled; an even more important function of the annual eye exam is testing for possible eye diseases via dilation, retinal scanning, intraocular pressure testing, and other methods. I can't tell you how many patients have gotten annoyed with me when I refuse to refill their 3 year old glasses prescription, saying, "But I see fine. I just need new glasses." I understand that, but many eye diseases have no symptoms (glaucoma being a prime suspect), which is why we want to see patients once a year.

I work for an optometrist now and have worked for both optometrists and opthalmologists for the past 15 years. Optometrists have the skills to detect eye disease just as ophthalmologists do. They are not able to treat major eye diseases once they detect them, however. They can handle simple things like styes and dry eye, but when they discover cataracts, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, or other eye diseases, they refer to an ophthalmologist. They fulfill the very important function of handling mostly younger patients who usually have healthy eyes and catching eye diseases in its early stages in older patients. Keeping your eyes healthy and your vision sharp requires a team approach among the patient, optometrist, and ophthalmologist.
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Old 08-25-2016, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
20,791 posts, read 41,427,990 times
Reputation: 14036
Quote:
Originally Posted by OpanaPointer View Post
I'm currently 14 months into a 90-minute cataract removal procedure. This includes a total of six hours of surgery.
Why six hours of surgery? You do know that is unusual - so why not elaborate?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FiveLoaves View Post
Can we get a summation of this thread to date.......

Is the cataract surgery painless ?? I'm not sure I'm going to be able to lay still while someone sticks a scalpel in my eye.

Is the Surgery successful 90 % ?? 70% ?? 50% of the time ?? Do your eyes regress after a few years ??
For me, surgery was painless and a non-event - twilight anesthesia plus another anesthetic injected into the eye before surgery. Surgery was 100% successful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
They put you in twilight sleep, and you don't remember any or most of it. I woke up (sort of) toward the end of my second surgery, then went out again, and can verify it was completely painless. They put a weighted blanket thing on you to keep you from moving around. Afterward, there was a bit of itching (felt like itching from allergies) and I had to wear a cup on my eye to protect it. That's about it.

If you have concerns, be sure to talk to your ophthalmologist about them.

They take out the lens and insert a plastic artificial one. He left the membrane behind the lens and said that the membrane typically clouds up over time, so a few weeks after surgery I went in for laser surgery to punch holes in the membrane. That involves a few eyedrops, sitting in a chair while the doctor positions the laser and there are a few clicks activating the laser. You feel exactly nothing. He said people sometimes have this later on, but most people will experience some clouding of the membranes eventually. Having the laser surgery right after means I don't have to worry about it later on. That was over 20 years ago, and my eyes are fine.
Sounds like you had a really good eye doctor. My cataract surgery mirrored yours - except no eye cup and one told me about clouding of the membrane or did an immediate followup to head it off. Of course, I didn't bother going back to the doc for a few years, either, so I may be to blame for that. I did read about this post-op 'complication' on the internet. Seven years after surgery vision was getting really bad, so had laser posterior capsulotomy done on both eyes this spring. Vision is now clear as a bell. This simple laser procedure could easily have been done in docs office, imo, but instead was done at the ambulatory surgical center of a hospital. Medicare cost was $434 for surgical center plus $304 for opthalmologist to do five-minute procedure - total cost per eye $737.

Cataracts began in my 50s. In my early 60's, I began having serious issues driving at night. Had cataract surgery at age 67. I had always worked nights, doing a lot of close work under flourescent light. Doc commented on how thick the cataracts were - I think due to that. Had surgery on a Friday, went to work on Monday. No issues. Retired one-month after first surgery, second eye was done four weeks after retirement. Now I can manage w/100 watt bulbs, only use drugstore reading glasses for reading/computer. Distance vision perfect. One eye is actually 20/20 - this after having been severely nearsighted since age 10.

I still, however, take a vision supplement daily (Vision Essentials from Forward Nutrition). Been on the stuff for 15 years. Swear by it. No issues w/retina or other odd complications.

Last edited by Ariadne22; 08-25-2016 at 04:36 PM..
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Old 08-25-2016, 07:35 PM
 
Location: LA, CA/ In This Time and Place
5,425 posts, read 3,278,164 times
Reputation: 5033
This is occurring with my dad, who will turn 66 in a few days. He also has dementia, which sucks.
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Old 08-25-2016, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Georgia
4,514 posts, read 3,772,562 times
Reputation: 15511
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Optometrists SHOULD be looking for things but obviously don't have the training to fully evaluate you. You just CANNOT take the chance of losing your vision!
Actually, my optometrist was the one who was noted the beginnings of the cataract and told me that I needed to consider surgery and gave me two referrals to check out. He maps my retina every year, because I have a family history of macular degeneration. He had also noted the Fuchs distrophy. The eye surgeon made the decision on what kind of lens to put in, timing, etc., but all my follow-up was with my optometrist. He and his office is fantastic - he's been taking good care of us for 28 years. But he's in a private practice, he's not with one of the chains, where the doctors come and go.
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