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Old 03-11-2008, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 1,903,357 times
Reputation: 369

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skywings View Post
Yes, actually I did know that. However, as in many things, the exact definition of 'germaphobe' surely differs from person to person. I'm sure some of my habits (such as using 3 separate cutting boards for meat, poultry and fruits/vegetables and thoroughly cleansing them after each use; using disposable gloves when working with raw meat and poultry; never placing a piece of grilled meat or poultry back onto the same plate that it was brought raw to the bbq on) might seem 'germaphobic' to some people but are perfectly normal procedure to others. Most supermarkets are now providing sanitizing-wipes dispensers in their shopping cart areas; does using them make someone 'germaphobic', or simply 'cautious'? It's all a matter of individual perception (as in the classic "I am firm in my convictions; you are as stubborn as a mule" example)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hazzard
As you have an appropriate screenname, did you know Howard Hughes who was a fanatical germaphobe who saved his urine and nail clippings and wouldn't touch any article without it being wrapped in facial tissues?
Very well composted. Yes, that would be me "Mr. Stubborn as a Mule". I have to give you some rep for the tenacity of your post, very well executed.
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Old 03-11-2008, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Utah
4,897 posts, read 13,216,938 times
Reputation: 4719
I always remove my shoes. I keep my shoes in a pile in front of the house door from the garage. I ask my guests to remove them if the weather's bad or if there are little kids coming into my house. I don't want their shoes on my furniture.
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Old 03-11-2008, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Bike to Surf!
3,080 posts, read 9,252,694 times
Reputation: 2960
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hazzard View Post
With all due respect and call me what you like, this "shoes off" phobia smacks of egalitarianism and a controlling attitude toward life in general. I live in a small apartment with a "wipe your feet mat" at the entrance door, use the mat and you're good to go as long as you're not wearing spiked shoes. I have a tile floor with throw rugs, both of which are very cleanable. I live in my apartment, it's not like it's hallowed ground. Should a VIP visit your residence, would you give them the same footware treatment as a "commoner"?
Yes, especially since the apartment would have likely just been cleaned in preparation for their visit. They would be asked to remove their hat as well. Likewise, no spitting, swearing, or smoking indoors. These are my house rules, and they are imposed on all guests equally.

You might call my rules egalitarian, but what about your own? What makes your house rules superior to mine? For instance, why shouldn't I park my car on your lawn? It's not hurting anything and I don't like to walk an extra 10 feet just to bow to your controlling attitude. Why can't I relieve myself in your apartment's hallway? I don't want to wait for your other guest to get out of the bathroom, I'm uncomfortable now, and you are constraining the action I would like to take to solve the situation.

IMO, guests have the responsibility to follow their host's rules, and host's have the responsibility to take care of their guest's needs. If either party fails at this or refuses to accept their responsibities, the tacit contract of hospitality is broken and the visit should end.

For instance, if your apartment was on the 4th floor, and one of the conditions for visiting was to leave via jumping out the window, I would probably not visit you at home. Likewise, anyone who does not wish to remove their shoes when entering my home may feel free to phone, email, or meet me somewhere else.
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Old 03-11-2008, 07:44 PM
 
3,689 posts, read 9,490,349 times
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Growing up (SE Michigan) the middle class /blue collar area I grew up in was a shoes-on area.

The upper-class white carpeting (Seriously, white carpeting?) was a shoes-off area.

I am not saying it is strictly class, but certainly there are different attitudes. I have enough other things to worry about that worrying about shoes in my house would be insane. I also expect that if someone did step in something really foul before coming in, they would apologize and explain - as in "I'm so sorry, do you mind if I take my shoes off? I just stepped in hot tar."

Since if I stepped in something foul - I would do that before dirtying someone's carpet irrepairably.

However, dirt (dust, dander, grass seeds, etc..) is just not something I can worry about. I am a big believer in the exposure to dirt is how people get an immune system. So I would just never worry about someone wearing street-shoes into my home.

That said, if visiting - we would comply with the request that we take our shoes off - but we would never automatically do it as it would literally never occur to us.
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Old 03-11-2008, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 1,903,357 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by sponger42 View Post
Yes, especially since the apartment would have likely just been cleaned in preparation for their visit. They would be asked to remove their hat as well. Likewise, no spitting, swearing, or smoking indoors. These are my house rules, and they are imposed on all guests equally.

You might call my rules egalitarian, but what about your own? What makes your house rules superior to mine? For instance, why shouldn't I park my car on your lawn? It's not hurting anything and I don't like to walk an extra 10 feet just to bow to your controlling attitude. Why can't I relieve myself in your apartment's hallway? I don't want to wait for your other guest to get out of the bathroom, I'm uncomfortable now, and you are constraining the action I would like to take to solve the situation.

IMO, guests have the responsibility to follow their host's rules, and host's have the responsibility to take care of their guest's needs. If either party fails at this or refuses to accept their responsibities, the tacit contract of hospitality is broken and the visit should end.

For instance, if your apartment was on the 4th floor, and one of the conditions for visiting was to leave via jumping out the window, I would probably not visit you at home. Likewise, anyone who does not wish to remove their shoes when entering my home may feel free to phone, email, or meet me somewhere else.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hazzard
With all due respect and call me what you like, this "shoes off" phobia smacks of egalitarianism and a controlling attitude toward life in general. I live in a small apartment with a "wipe your feet mat" at the entrance door, use the mat and you're good to go as long as you're not wearing spiked shoes. I have a tile floor with throw rugs, both of which are very cleanable. I live in my apartment, it's not like it's hallowed ground. Should a VIP visit your residence, would you give them the same footware treatment as a "commoner"?
Well, you did get one fact right, I do live in a 4th floor apartment. The rest of your post is sheer BS! My house (apartment) rules are that I have no rules, other than to please call or email me that you'll be visiting on a certain date/time to confirm I'll be at home to receive you, and this is a non-smoking building. Drop-ins are always welcomed and if I'm in the shower, bathroom or bed, they're smart enough to deal with the situation. My children have keys to my apartment building and apartment and I don't expect "call aheads" from them or family. People are very comfortable visiting my apartment and note that they wish I had a bigger apartment. I was wrong, with all due respect, you are an egalitarian elitist and I'll bet that you're a Republican, tow the right wingnut line, voted for Bush and will vote for McCain or not because McCain is not conservative enough for your superior attitudes.
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Old 03-11-2008, 10:43 PM
 
Location: ~~In my mind~~
2,111 posts, read 5,982,489 times
Reputation: 1622
This thread has given me a chuckle tonight. Steve I believe I would have you over to my place. You crack me up. I'll even let ya leave on the shoes. Lol. For me, I have tried to have my girls and the hubby take off their shoes, sometimes they do, sometimes they dont. I really dont care anymore. I do take mine off and put on my nice comfy slippers though.
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Old 03-11-2008, 10:59 PM
 
184 posts, read 1,316,749 times
Reputation: 186
Wow, I didn't realize that the shoes on/shoes off thing was such a hot-button topic! :-) I won't get into any stereotyping or namecalling over it, but will just say that I've always believed in the 'my house, my rules' philosophy and apply it to the homes of others fully as much as I apply it to my own. For instance I don't allow smoking in my home, which I consider is 100% my right as the homeowner to do: My house, my rules. I do have some friends who are smokers and/or allow smoking in their house, and I would never expect them to not smoke (or not allow someone else to smoke) in their own house just because I can't tolerate being in any kind of smoking environment: Their house, their rules. So I visit with those people elsewhere (I live in a state with very tough no-smoking laws for public places, so that's an easy solution!). On occasion I've gone to someone's house not knowing that people would be smoking, and in that case I take a polite and gracious leave of the premises. Even if the host offers to ask people not to smoke because of me, I do not stay, because IMO it's not my place as a guest to expect a host to change their usual preferences in order to accomodate mine. But again, that's just MHO. Everyone is different in their at-home preferences (the matter of drop-ins is a great example, btw; some people love or don't mind it, others hate it, but neither is 'wrong'... we're just different :-) Hey, some people actually LIKE lima beans but as long as I myself don't have to eat them, noooo problem! )
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Old 03-11-2008, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 1,903,357 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suzet2262 View Post
This thread has given me a chuckle tonight. Steve I believe I would have you over to my place. You crack me up. I'll even let ya leave on the shoes. Lol. For me, I have tried to have my girls and the hubby take off their shoes, sometimes they do, sometimes they dont. I really dont care anymore. I do take mine off and put on my nice comfy slippers though.
Thanks Suzet. I'm happy that this thread has put a smile on your face. If I'm ever in the Bakersfield-Keene-Mojave areas, I'll have to look you up and drop by for a visit. LMAO. BTW, I was an owner-operator for United Van Lines Household Goods Division for 12 years and was in your soon-to-be location several times, it's just far enough away from Bakersfield to be a good California location. Good luck with the move and if you're using a commercial mover, you can't go wrong with a United or Mayflower agent (Same holding company LLC). Steve
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Old 03-11-2008, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 1,903,357 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skywings View Post
Wow, I didn't realize that the shoes on/shoes off thing was such a hot-button topic! :-) I won't get into any stereotyping or namecalling over it, but will just say that I've always believed in the 'my house, my rules' philosophy and apply it to the homes of others fully as much as I apply it to my own. For instance I don't allow smoking in my home, which I consider is 100% my right as the homeowner to do: My house, my rules. I do have some friends who are smokers and/or allow smoking in their house, and I would never expect them to not smoke (or not allow someone else to smoke) in their own house just because I can't tolerate being in any kind of smoking environment: Their house, their rules. So I visit with those people elsewhere (I live in a state with very tough no-smoking laws for public places, so that's an easy solution!). On occasion I've gone to someone's house not knowing that people would be smoking, and in that case I take a polite and gracious leave of the premises. Even if the host offers to ask people not to smoke because of me, I do not stay, because IMO it's not my place as a guest to expect a host to change their usual preferences in order to accomodate mine. But again, that's just MHO. Everyone is different in their at-home preferences (the matter of drop-ins is a great example, btw; some people love or don't mind it, others hate it, but neither is 'wrong'... we're just different :-) Hey, some people actually LIKE lima beans but as long as I myself don't have to eat them, noooo problem! )
Good post, I liked it. I respect people's rules and if I don't agree or can't bend to their peculiarities, I vote with my feet and leave, but I will always tell the person or persons why I'm leaving because, well, I'm just that kind of a "cards on the table" guy, like it or not. I'm 61 years old, I don't make excuses for my actions or lack there of, and I don't kiss ass because it's not PC and I might hurt someone's fragile ego.
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Old 03-12-2008, 04:03 AM
 
Location: Earth
24,639 posts, read 22,604,001 times
Reputation: 11234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hazzard View Post
With all due respect and call me what you like, this "shoes off" phobia smacks of egalitarianism and a controlling attitude toward life in general. I live in a small apartment with a "wipe your feet mat" at the entrance door, use the mat and you're good to go as long as you're not wearing spiked shoes. I have a tile floor with throw rugs, both of which are very cleanable. I live in my apartment, it's not like it's hallowed ground. Should a VIP visit your residence, would you give them the same footware treatment as a "commoner"?
Please don't ever visit any homes owned by Asians, or visit Asia. It is the norm to remove shoes as a sign of respect when you enter a home.

Shoes are not worn in buddhist temples and the foot is not shown to others or statues of the buddha.
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