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Old 09-10-2017, 10:53 PM
 
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Why do cold like symptoms always accompany colder weather or cooling?

NYC metro is starting to get colder, and once again, I am sneezing, stuffy nose. It always like this. When it starts to warm I never have this, except from allergies of course.

Are there trees and plants that expel pollen when fall hits?
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Old 09-11-2017, 08:57 AM
 
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We don't get symptoms like that from cool weather. We get those symptoms from dairy products.
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Old 09-11-2017, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Wine Country
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The air temperature has nothing to do with getting a cold. When the air is cold people go inside and they start to infect each other.
If you have a hard time with dairy then you might get some symptoms, but dairy also has zero to do with catching a cold.
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Old 09-11-2017, 09:13 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraG View Post
We get those symptoms from dairy products.
C'mon. Even if that were generally true (and it isn't), people don't eat dairy products only in cold weather.

You may be sensitive to something in the air at this time of year. More likely, if you live where the air is humid when it's warm but dry when it's cold, you may be reacting to the dryness of the air. Have you tried a humidifier?

Some studies also suggest that more illness during the winter (e.g. "flu season") is related to lower levels of vitamin D because of low sunshine levels. Taking a vitamin D supplement is almost always a good idea.

I assume in urban areas like the the NYC metro, people are indoors / in close contact with other people all year, so I don't really buy the theory that winter colds are caused by being inside more in the winter.
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Old 09-11-2017, 11:41 AM
 
Location: rural DE
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Cold can lower your resistance because your body uses more energy to keep itself warm. Also, colder air is drier and if the insides of your healthy breathing passages, especially your nose, become dry, they produce mucus to protect themselves. That goes on all winter, but you really notice it the most in the beginning.
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Old 09-16-2017, 07:11 AM
 
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I have this same problem. I would like to know the answer too. It is clearly related to the weather. If my home gets under 70 degrees and a degree of dryness.. I instantly have a sore throat. I do believe it is related to the dry mucus. When this happens my nose gets utterly dried out.

Once the weather gets to remain like this all the time, I get used to it. So in February a 5 degree day doesn't give me a sorethoat.

I have tired for many years to avoid this by a humidifier or drinking more water but it just doesn't seem to do anything. What honestly has helped is taping a piece of skin tape over a piece of tissue that sort of drapes over my nose and a bit of my mouth. This allows the breath from my mouth to get captured near my nose. You have to make sure you don't cover your mouth. But it is enough to trap some warm moist water near your nose. Do that for a night and wake up without a sore throat.
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Old 09-16-2017, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
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It's obviously sinus issues that you are describing (be it allergies, indoor air quality, dryness, etc.)
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Old 09-16-2017, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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Many have speculated that migratory birds can trigger some of the problems - but the jury is out and it does not 'look' like this is an issue: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2828095/. Perhaps it is just a greater issue with our kids that migrate back to school?
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Old 09-16-2017, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flamingo13 View Post
It's obviously sinus issues that you are describing (be it allergies, indoor air quality, dryness, etc.)
Exactly.
Even sudden changes in sunlight can cause vasomotor rhinitis.

It doesn't have to be pollen or viruses or congregating inside. Every time we have a new front move through our area any time of year (north texas), I get a bunch of patients running in thinking they have flu-mageddon.

Many of these people do tend to be more allergy prone.
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Old 09-16-2017, 11:58 AM
 
Location: rural DE
1,275 posts, read 341,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyFoxSeaton View Post
I have this same problem. I would like to know the answer too. It is clearly related to the weather. If my home gets under 70 degrees and a degree of dryness.. I instantly have a sore throat. I do believe it is related to the dry mucus. When this happens my nose gets utterly dried out.

Once the weather gets to remain like this all the time, I get used to it. So in February a 5 degree day doesn't give me a sorethoat.

I have tired for many years to avoid this by a humidifier or drinking more water but it just doesn't seem to do anything. What honestly has helped is taping a piece of skin tape over a piece of tissue that sort of drapes over my nose and a bit of my mouth. This allows the breath from my mouth to get captured near my nose. You have to make sure you don't cover your mouth. But it is enough to trap some warm moist water near your nose. Do that for a night and wake up without a sore throat.
Try saline spray from the drugstore. It can get you through that transition period when it first goes dry. I think it helps me avoid some colds.
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