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Old 03-10-2018, 09:45 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,159 posts, read 6,344,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
Drugs--like other items sold in stores--can be "loss leaders"
Meaning their low costs are used to lure people into stores to spend money on other items
And it could be the pharmacy itself has deal with the drug company to offset prices of some drugs while others are higher...
Lisinopril definitely falls into a loss leader category in the Publix, and Winn Dixie stores ( I'd bet a few other stores as well), where up to a 90 day supply can be had for free, with a prescription. I recently filled one of these prescriptions for my mother, a 90 day supply with three refills, which sets her up for a year.
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Old 03-10-2018, 09:51 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,159 posts, read 6,344,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iggier View Post
Through the pharmacy benefit of my medical insurance, a drug/prescription price, for the identical medication in the identical quantity, in the identical dosage, can widely vary across retail pharmacies. Case in point - one of my prescriptions is less than half the cost at the local grocery store pharmacy than it is at the closest CVS, and these are located less than one mile from each other. Why arenít drug prices uniform across all pharmacies? I just donít get it.
I've seen that too, with various pharmacies. IMO it's basically what the market in those areas will bear. Also convenience for the customers.
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Old 03-10-2018, 11:34 AM
 
Location: SC
1,877 posts, read 1,041,545 times
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I too have no insurance, but am now on Lisinopril 5mg. I go to the local Family Health Clinic, see the Dr, get the Rx, then have it filled for the 60-90 days at the local Walmart. $10.00, for 90 days.
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Old 03-10-2018, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,007 posts, read 5,301,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
OP's question was specifically about buying the Rx.
Where can you buy a Scrip? For anything?
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Old 03-10-2018, 04:11 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,159 posts, read 6,344,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moxiegal View Post
I too have no insurance, but am now on Lisinopril 5mg. I go to the local Family Health Clinic, see the Dr, get the Rx, then have it filled for the 60-90 days at the local Walmart. $10.00, for 90 days.

If you have Winn Dixie grocery stores there you might be able to get it free there.
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Old 03-10-2018, 04:15 PM
 
218 posts, read 69,672 times
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"OP's question was specifically about buying the Rx."

You can't "buy" a Rx. Legally, anyway.
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Old 03-10-2018, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,522 posts, read 26,139,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
Where can you buy a Scrip? For anything?
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFSGood View Post
"OP's question was specifically about buying the Rx."

You can't "buy" a Rx. Legally, anyway.
You do not pay for the piece of paper that allows the pharmacist to dispense the medication. You buy the medication itself. It's a bit strange that I have to explain that I meant the medication.
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Old 03-10-2018, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
19,047 posts, read 10,073,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
A Costco pharmacist once pointed out to me that it would be cheaper for me to pay for a prescription out of pocket than pay my insurance plan's co-pay.

Another time a different Costco pharmacist told me that the prescription I had was for a drug that was available OTC as a generic for a lot less money. That was for Prilosec. I started looking at my doctor in a whole new light - she must have known that.

Yes, I'm a devoted fan of Costco pharmacies.
A doctor doesn't pay attention to insurance coverage or the price of meds, and they don't get any benefit from your co-pay vs you paying out of pocket. That's all the vagaries of our health insurance system although I will say that my HMO charges the lesser price if the actual price of the meds is lower than my Rx co-pay.

As for generic, those are frequently a lower dose than the Rx version, so you may have paid less but gotten less medicine. OTC prilosec is 20 mg, but Rx dosage is frequently 40 or 60 mg depending on the condition. And either way, I have no idea why you'd look at your doctor differently, they aren't the one selling the prilosec or setting the price, just telling you what medicine to use to treat your condition.
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Old 03-10-2018, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,522 posts, read 26,139,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
A doctor doesn't pay attention to insurance coverage or the price of meds, and they don't get any benefit from your co-pay vs you paying out of pocket. That's all the vagaries of our health insurance system although I will say that my HMO charges the lesser price if the actual price of the meds is lower than my Rx co-pay.

As for generic, those are frequently a lower dose than the Rx version, so you may have paid less but gotten less medicine. OTC prilosec is 20 mg, but Rx dosage is frequently 40 or 60 mg depending on the condition. And either way, I have no idea why you'd look at your doctor differently, they aren't the one selling the prilosec or setting the price, just telling you what medicine to use to treat your condition.
Doctors do pay attention to insurance coverage of medications. If they prescribe something that is not on the formulary for the patient's drug coverage, there are time consuming hoops they have to jump through to get it approved by the insurance company. It's called "prior authorization".

Curing the prior authorization headache | Medical Economics

Generics should be the same dose as the brand form of the drug. The dose is determined by the indication for the medication. If a prescription drug goes OTC, it may be at a lower dose than the prescription product.

https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ResourcesF.../ucm167991.htm
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Old 03-15-2018, 09:18 AM
 
Location: New Britain, CT
583 posts, read 185,617 times
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Even with no refills, if you call in a refill to the pharmacy, the pharmacy will contact the doctor for additional refills. The doctor will refill, or you will get a call from the doctor for an office visit. Once refilled, pharmacy is happy to take your cash
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