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Old 04-12-2018, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Orlando
1,754 posts, read 2,338,037 times
Reputation: 6236

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My late husband always had his blood pressure reading checked twice at each doctor's appointment. The first time they would take it -- whoever did it, by whatever method -- the reading was high. They let him sit quietly a few minutes, re-did the reading, and it was always considerably lower the second time.

 
Old 04-12-2018, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,215 posts, read 25,712,063 times
Reputation: 26014
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyFoxSeaton View Post
Nope. That is just something doctors say when you have a high reading and they don't want to worry you. My mom always said it was stress and being nervous... a doctor told me it wasn't true and it has been scientifically debunked. IF we could do that people could control lowering it at a doctor's visit which never happens.

Heart rate is low.. and was with both the doctor and the nurse. 60. The doctor was just making excuses for the bad reading.
Yes, white coat hypertension exists. Please provide links to the studies showing "it has been scientifically debunked".

I already provided a study showing that pressure can be significantly different at the beginning and end of an office visit.

You stated in the OP that your pressures were first 129/83 then later 106-110/70-72. Unless you are adding the systolic and diastolic numbers that is not a 30 point difference as you claim in a later post.

You prefer to ascribe to incompetence a well recognized physiologic phenomenon.
 
Old 04-12-2018, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,215 posts, read 25,712,063 times
Reputation: 26014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
I couldn't agree more, OP. No one knows how to take a manual blood pressure, and to all medical providers reading this, I'll let you know: the ability to take a manual blood pressure is an essential skill. Why? Every time I go to any doctor's office they use one of those stupid automatic blood pressure cuffs and every time they check me, it runs high, about 160/90. They take it repeatedly using the stupid machine, despite the fact that I tell them EMPHATICALLY that my blood pressure does not read accurately on that horrid machine; they must take it manually. And no one has the manual cuff, or they flat don't know how to use it. They say "I'm a nervous patient." False. The machine is inaccurate. I am not the only person like this. Many others read inaccurately on the machines too.

Finally the 80 year old nurse listens to me, digs out a manual cuff from the junk closet or to be shredded pile, checks me, and miraculously, it's 110/70 I fired my last primary care doctor when he tried to diagnose me with high blood pressure after checking it repeatedly with the machine, despite my shouted insistence his nurse needed to check it manually. When he finally did, he grudgingly admitted I was right; I did not have high blood pressure after all.
With that attitude, I am not surprised that your pressure is always high when checked with an automated device. It's pretty much guaranteed to be.
 
Old 04-12-2018, 11:30 AM
 
916 posts, read 366,880 times
Reputation: 1535
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
I go to any doctor's office they use one of those stupid automatic blood pressure cuffs and every time they check me, it runs high, about 160/90. They take it repeatedly using the stupid machine, despite the fact that I tell them EMPHATICALLY that my blood pressure does not read accurately on that horrid machine;
Boy if my doctor used one of those I would probably leave. I used to go to a weight loss plan and they used that.. 160/90 - ever freaking time. And ever freaking time, the nurse would have to check it manually and it would be normal. I just assumed they had stock in the company or something.

My mom had a home machine and it was also inaccurate. About 20 to 30 points above reality.

I just don't see how anyone can monitor their BP if it is a guessing game.
 
Old 04-12-2018, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
12,737 posts, read 7,195,708 times
Reputation: 26713
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
With that attitude, I am not surprised that your pressure is always high when checked with an automated device. It's pretty much guaranteed to be.
Like most people, I know my body and I know what works and what doesn't. After my blood pressure has read wrong on the automatic machines many times, I shouldn't have to fuss with a doctor to get it read manually the first time I request it. And it's not too much to ask for a medical professional to perform such a simple medical test either.
 
Old 04-12-2018, 01:28 PM
 
Location: on the wind
3,765 posts, read 1,392,433 times
Reputation: 13622
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Yes, white coat hypertension exists. Please provide links to the studies showing "it has been scientifically debunked".

I already provided a study showing that pressure can be significantly different at the beginning and end of an office visit.

You stated in the OP that your pressures were first 129/83 then later 106-110/70-72. Unless you are adding the systolic and diastolic numbers that is not a 30 point difference as you claim in a later post.

You prefer to ascribe to incompetence a well recognized physiologic phenomenon.
Up until now every practice I've gone to has checked my BP with the "old-fashioned" cuff, and they also did this after I had been sitting quietly for a while (cooling my heels in the waiting room ). If the reading seemed high compared against my history they checked it again later in the visit. Why is it so difficult to understand that anxiety or stress can affect it over a short term (the appointment) as well as the long term (lifestyle, health)? I've seen it happen many times especially if I was late, had a lot going on during the day, or at their office because I was already worried about something. We can be our own worst enemies.

Thankfully my BP is usually fine, though it probably goes up a little reading particularly warped views of reality and bickering on C-D. At least there's a cure for that

Last edited by Parnassia; 04-12-2018 at 02:01 PM..
 
Old 04-12-2018, 02:02 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,054 posts, read 6,221,951 times
Reputation: 12497
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyFoxSeaton View Post
No just getting tired of people going off topic. White coat hypertension has been debunked in various studies. The only reason it persists is that doctors use it when they need to downplay a poor result.

There is no way this could have been white coat hypertension because it was a large difference in a matter of minutes.
White coat hypertension just describes a rise in a person's blood pressure due to stress, generally in a person whose blood pressure is within normal limits when he's not stressed. The description came about because many people ( including myself) tend to get nervous in anticipation of, and sometimes during a doctor's visit, and since they take blood pressures in this setting the elevated blood pressures are picked up there. The "white coat" refers to the lab coat worn by many doctors.

I had a doctor once whose comments on white coat hypertension was that if someone's blood pressure was elevated in his office, it would also be elevated under other stressful situations. I think he was right.

Emotion will also cause elevations in blood pressure ( that happens to me). It could very well be that if you were unhappy, and grousing over your perceived "incompetence" of the medical staff in this office, that might also have contributed to the observed elevation in your blood pressure at the time. I don't imagine your reaction made the staff all that thrilled either.
 
Old 04-12-2018, 02:04 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,054 posts, read 6,221,951 times
Reputation: 12497
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllisonHB View Post
Up until now every practice I've gone to has checked my BP with the "old-fashioned" cuff, and they also did this after I had been sitting quietly for a while (cooling my heels in the waiting room ). If the reading seemed high compared against my history they checked it again later in the visit. Why is it so difficult to understand that anxiety or stress can affect it over a short term (the appointment) as well as the long term (lifestyle, health)? I've seen it happen many times especially if I was late, had a lot going on during the day, or at their office because I was already worried about something. We can be our own worst enemies.

Thankfully my BP is usually fine, though it probably goes up a little reading particularly warped views of reality and bickering on C-D. At least there's a cure for that
That's been my experience as well. Generally if my blood pressure was elevated when the medical assistance/CNA took it, the doctor checked it again at the end of the exam.
 
Old 04-12-2018, 02:05 PM
 
916 posts, read 366,880 times
Reputation: 1535
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
Emotion will also cause elevations in blood pressure ( that happens to me). It could very well be that if you were unhappy, and grousing over your perceived "incompetence" of the medical staff in this office, that might also have contributed to the observed elevation in your blood pressure at the time. I don't imagine your reaction made the staff all that thrilled either.
You don't know what your talking about. If you had read you would see that I only found out the reading was off when my doctor did a second and third reading. Until then, I was blissfully unaware.

Well if it happens to you it must be SCIENCE!
 
Old 04-12-2018, 02:07 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,054 posts, read 6,221,951 times
Reputation: 12497
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyFoxSeaton View Post
Boy if my doctor used one of those I would probably leave. I used to go to a weight loss plan and they used that.. 160/90 - ever freaking time. And ever freaking time, the nurse would have to check it manually and it would be normal. I just assumed they had stock in the company or something.

My mom had a home machine and it was also inaccurate. About 20 to 30 points above reality.

I just don't see how anyone can monitor their BP if it is a guessing game.
It's not a guessing game. My doctors use manual blood pressure machines, and the readings aren't all that different than the electronic version I use at home.
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