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Old 04-12-2018, 12:15 PM
 
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So I am dieting right now and I fasted for my blood tests this morning. About 15 hours. My LDL? 225. My doctor freaked.

I immediately knew it was due to my dieting and fasting. Previously I had gone on a strict liquid diet and after my first lipid tests my LDL was high. Everyone else in the class had great cholesterol numbers after having lost weight. Mine were never higher. And I had lived on their food for 3 months. When I got off the diet and went back to eating normally I had one of my best results ever.. under 100.

Also, when I look at my cholesterol numbers.. they are always much lower / more reasonable when I am not fasting when I get the tests.

When speaking to my brother one time he noted the same thing happens with him. Someone once suggested to me that dieting / fasting puts your body under stress and its reaction to that is cholesterol. Some have suggested it is a liver dump of cholesterol.

Does anyone know why this happens?
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Old 04-14-2018, 07:16 AM
 
916 posts, read 369,174 times
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Found it!

Dehydration during fasting increases serum lipids and lipoproteins.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7895421

Dieting followed by fasting followed by morning black coffee makes for one very dehydrated subject.
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Old 04-14-2018, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Wine Country
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Maybe stop fasting? Just a thought.
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Old 04-14-2018, 10:11 AM
 
916 posts, read 369,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luckyd609 View Post
Maybe stop fasting? Just a thought.
Thanks. Yes. I will do that. Interesting that... once again... my doctor didn't have a clue and almost put me on meds for something that was easily fixed with a swig of water.
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Old 04-14-2018, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
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Fasting does not mean you are not supposed to drink water...... stay hydrated.
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Old 04-14-2018, 11:47 AM
 
916 posts, read 369,174 times
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Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
Fasting does not mean you are not supposed to drink water...... stay hydrated.
I do drink water but I piddle it out. I suspect dieting makes this process worse and keeps me in a lower hydrated state which then gets worse when I fast and have coffee.
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Old 04-14-2018, 11:55 AM
 
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I increase my intake of calories and healthy fats (avocado, nuts, olive oil) for the 3 days immediately prior to the test. Then of course I fast pre-test as instructed by my doctor - 12 hours - during which I make sure to stay hydrated. But I eat healthy fats right up to the deadline. My favorite thing is to eat 1/2 an avocado sprinkled with lemon juice as I watch the clock tick down to the 12-hour mark.

When I do this, my LDL always tests in range. In the past, I'd try to cut my fat and calorie intake way down for a week or so before the blood draw and my LDL always tested high.

Dave Feldman, a software/data engineer, has been experimenting with and tracking this phenomena for awhile now. He calls it the "Feldman Protocol".

For anyone wondering, it's not cheating unless your doctor specifically tells you to cut back on calories and fat for a few days preceding the test. My doctor knows what I do. As long as I follow the 12-hr fasting instructions, he's good with it.
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Old 04-14-2018, 02:39 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,055 posts, read 6,233,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
I increase my intake of calories and healthy fats (avocado, nuts, olive oil) for the 3 days immediately prior to the test. Then of course I fast pre-test as instructed by my doctor - 12 hours - during which I make sure to stay hydrated. But I eat healthy fats right up to the deadline. My favorite thing is to eat 1/2 an avocado sprinkled with lemon juice as I watch the clock tick down to the 12-hour mark.

When I do this, my LDL always tests in range. In the past, I'd try to cut my fat and calorie intake way down for a week or so before the blood draw and my LDL always tested high.

Dave Feldman, a software/data engineer, has been experimenting with and tracking this phenomena for awhile now. He calls it the "Feldman Protocol".

For anyone wondering, it's not cheating unless your doctor specifically tells you to cut back on calories and fat for a few days preceding the test. My doctor knows what I do. As long as I follow the 12-hr fasting instructions, he's good with it.
LOL, my husband would call that "studying for your blood test.".:
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Old 04-14-2018, 04:27 PM
 
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Weight loss can temporarily raise LDL cholesterol because the fatty acids in your body fat are being released and dealt with. This is a well-known phenomenon.
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Old 04-14-2018, 04:58 PM
 
916 posts, read 369,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murk View Post
Weight loss can temporarily raise LDL cholesterol because the fatty acids in your body fat are being released and dealt with. This is a well-known phenomenon.
Thanks. Possible contributor but I don't think the main factor for me.

First I have lost all of 5 lbs so that seems like too little to cause a massive spike. In addition when I am dieting, but not fasting, -- or fasting but not dieting - I have normal cholesterol. For me the only combo that can consistently cause this mass spike is both dieting and fasting -- which seems to point toward dehydration.

Though dieting could cause the right conditions that only become acute when I am dehydrated.
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