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Old 05-13-2018, 05:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
Yes, not using the joint will make it worse, so continue to use it even though using it is painful--work through the pain.
That's it, and I have lots of experience with it. Not exercising is a great way to cripple yourself with arthritis.

But what we really want is for a doc to play "Mommie kiss boo-boo, boo-boo go away."
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Old 05-13-2018, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
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First, when you are favoring one side of your body whether it be upper or lower, it can effect the other side. The other side is moving different and sometimes "carrying" more of the load, while the other side is healing.

My only experience with PT is my husband's shoulder. Had surgery, HAD to move and stretch it if he wanted the most mobility when it healed, and yes, it hurt. He knew it before going, and he knew he would have to suck it up if he wanted the best possible outcome.

Despite needing a new surgery (different problem), he ended up with almost full mobility and good strength on that arm. You will not get that babying it.
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Old 05-13-2018, 12:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cindi Waters View Post
They took an x-ray of the knee (NOT the knee on the side where his hip broke). The pain started for the first time on that knee after he started the bicycling exercise for the hip. He never had knee pain before that. To be honest, arthritis in that knee, while it may be true that the x-ray showed that, is just not a good enough excuse for the sudden pain. He never had it before. I would think a competent, capable physical therapist would be able to understand exercises surrounding the painful joint, not to exacerbate it with head-on exercise and claim you have to work through the pain, when it's getting worse. But thanks anyway for your opinion.

Or it may be that it is a good enough excuse for the sudden onset of pain. But "working through the pain" is not the best way in my opinion, to deal with it. But then who am I? I'm certainly not a PT or doctor. (I just don't trust many of them.)

It may not be how it works with arthritis, but odd that's the sequence about my husband's surgery. I do know of a person who had bladder surgery, and after that the arthritis went through her body so badly she couldn't walk. I also know of another person who had a baker's cyst removed from her knee (I had a baker's cyst, wouldn't DARE let a surgeon touch it), and after that she had to leave her job and is permanently disabled with crippling arthritis. While many surgeries do work, the scare stories of others definitely would keep me away from surgery unless it was a life-or-death situation. Maybe the surgery releases toxins, who knows? I sure don't. But I still would not go for surgery unless, as I said, I was absolutely convinced it was a life-or-death situation.
No "toxins" are released from any surgery that would suddenly "cause arthritis" just not how it happens, as for "who knows" anyone that studies human anatomy and physiology knows, this isn't some unknown mystery of the human condition....

Someone who "developed" crippling arthritis after bladder surgery already had arthritis, onset of symptoms nothing more than coincidence...

As for "developing arthritis" after removal of a Baker's cyst? If you have a Baker's cyst you likely have arthritis..a Baker's cyst is almost always a SIGN of arthritis or a cartilage tear not the other way around.
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Old 05-13-2018, 02:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
That's it, and I have lots of experience with it. Not exercising is a great way to cripple yourself with arthritis.

But what we really want is for a doc to play "Mommie kiss boo-boo, boo-boo go away."
Yeah, we do, and we hope it goes away without too much trouble.
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Old 05-13-2018, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cindi Waters View Post
Yeah, we do, and we hope it goes away without too much trouble.
That doesn't really happen, and why we have PT.
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Old 05-13-2018, 08:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cindi Waters View Post
To be honest, arthritis in that knee, while it may be true that the x-ray showed that, is just not a good enough excuse for the sudden pain. He never had it before.
I never had arthritic knee pain. Until the day I did.

Knee pain from arthritis is manageable.

-Rest (not bedrest)
-Applied gentle heat or cold packs, whichever works best
-Ibuprofen but watch dosage limits
-Myofascial release. My orthopedist and my trainer emphasize this and it works a treat. You use a foam roller on the areas surrounding the knee to gently release tension and knots. Don't use the roller on bone or directly on the knee, just around the knee.
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Old 05-13-2018, 11:42 PM
 
2,432 posts, read 837,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cindi Waters View Post
No, he did not bicycle before this. He's had several problems with his feet before this, though. So he loved to walk to exercise, but no longer can. Kind of sad to see someone (including myself) deteriorate, but it happens.
Arthritis is a sign of age or it's genetics, but I don't think it means you're deteriorating. The older you get, the more things ache. It's pretty universal. Move while you still can, treat the pain as everyone has suggested, and go on with life.
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Old 05-14-2018, 12:03 AM
 
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The knee is most likely hurting because he is not using the repaired hip appropriately. He is probably "protecting" it and overusing the good leg and knee. Be sure he does the exercises and uses that repaired hip and leg. He should be standing up straight, not leaning on the good side.
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Old 05-14-2018, 12:15 PM
 
538 posts, read 175,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC refugee View Post
Arthritis is a sign of age or it's genetics, but I don't think it means you're deteriorating. The older you get, the more things ache. It's pretty universal. Move while you still can, treat the pain as everyone has suggested, and go on with life.
We're trying...thanks. :-)
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Old 05-14-2018, 12:18 PM
 
538 posts, read 175,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
I never had arthritic knee pain. Until the day I did.

Knee pain from arthritis is manageable.

-Rest (not bedrest)
-Applied gentle heat or cold packs, whichever works best
-Ibuprofen but watch dosage limits
-Myofascial release. My orthopedist and my trainer emphasize this and it works a treat. You use a foam roller on the areas surrounding the knee to gently release tension and knots. Don't use the roller on bone or directly on the knee, just around the knee.
He said that the PT told him heat or cold packs, but how can heat work? Wouldn't it aggravate the condition? Because I thought it would inflame the inside, rather than cool it down. When he was in the hospital, they applied cold packs to the side of the hip operation and that did help.
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