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Old 05-15-2018, 10:05 PM
 
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It is hard to understand why anyone these days would start smoking---especially when so much is known about the health hazards involved.

Not to mention that many places just don't allow it anymore. Currently, we live in an apartment building that is smoke-free. Anyone who is a smoker and lives here, has to go outside and away from the building in order to smoke.

I've seen teenagers who have non-smoking parents and other family members who don't smoke, yet the teen will take up smoking. In some cases, they have seen family members who smoked that died from lung cancer. I'm sure that the teens who take it up think it will never happen to them. Either that, or they can quit whenever they want to.

When I was growing up, both my parents smoked although my father quit when I was 12. My mother kept on smoking heavily for almost 50 years. She quit 10 years before she died of lung cancer. One of my brothers started smoking when he was 13. Later on, he added pot and alcohol to the mix. He died 5 years ago of lung cancer at the age of 56.

I've looked up people that I knew when I was a kid. So many of them who smoked are no longer here due to contracting cancer. One who did smoke heavily dropped dead of a heart attack when she was 55. Others are currently battling cancer.

None of us are perfect and I certainly don't claim to be. However, looking back, I'm so glad that I never took up smoking.
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Old 05-16-2018, 12:15 AM
 
1,631 posts, read 2,173,690 times
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Here is a true story: I was a cop, years ago, working a fatal on the interstate. Hell of mess, blood, brains, etc. I had a rookie working with me and we needed to try CPR on one of the victims. So we did - ambulance shows up - we are trying to control traffic, deal with rubber-neckers, etc, etc.

Anyway, it calms down a bit, and I ask for a cigarette from on of the other cops, actually two cigarettes: I only smoke when I'm stressed. I hand one of the lighted smokes to my rookie. He says "I don't smoke" But he is shaking. I say "You do now."

So he smoked it and he stopped shaking.

And that is why, sometimes, some of us smoke.
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Old 05-16-2018, 03:59 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,701 posts, read 3,290,909 times
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At the end of this post, I have a couple of questions to the group.

I started biting my nails at a young age and chewed them down to the quick until they were raw and sometimes bleeding. In my mid-thirties, I stopped, one finger at a time. Even now, 30 years after I quit, if I get a snag in a nail, my finger goes into my mouth.

I smoke. I like gambling. I like my one or two glasses of wine at suppertime. I'm not obese, but I know I should lose 10-20 pounds and keep it off, but my problem is, is that I love carbs. I give them up when I diet, but always go back to them and then the weight goes back on.

I don't do drugs, but had the occasional puff of MJ when I was younger. Being so ignorant (back then) of hard drugs and addiction, I KNOW that I would have tried them if they had been offered. I am SO thankful they weren't around back then because I probably would be an addict (if not dead by now)

When I took up smoking as a teenager, it was becoming slowly known that cigarettes were carcinogenic. I enjoyed the few smokes I had each day and always told myself that I'd quit when I got married. Then I told myself I'd quit when I had kids. Well, it didn't quite happen that way. I was hooked. Still am.

Anyways, getting around to my first sentence... I know I have a habit-forming, addictive personality.
Was I born with this? Could THIS be the difference between people who take up bad habits and those who don't?

Both of my parents smoked. Four siblings in my family. Three smoked, one didn't. Why didn't the one smoke?
My husband's parents both smoked. Two kids, neither smoked. Why?
My girlfriend's parents: one smoked, one didn't. They had five children. Four smoked. One didn't. Why?

To those of you who smoke, would you call yourself an addictive, habit-forming person?
I know I am.

To those of you who DON'T smoke, truthfully, do you have ANY habits or addictions at all?

(I'm not asking you to list them. That is your business) Just yes or no.

So I'm wondering... could it be that people are BORN with habit forming personalities? Could this be the common factor?

Last edited by gouligann; 05-16-2018 at 04:23 AM..
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Old 05-16-2018, 07:17 AM
 
8,363 posts, read 6,813,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gouligann View Post
At the end of this post, I have a couple of questions to the group.

I started biting my nails at a young age and chewed them down to the quick until they were raw and sometimes bleeding. In my mid-thirties, I stopped, one finger at a time. Even now, 30 years after I quit, if I get a snag in a nail, my finger goes into my mouth.

I smoke. I like gambling. I like my one or two glasses of wine at suppertime. I'm not obese, but I know I should lose 10-20 pounds and keep it off, but my problem is, is that I love carbs. I give them up when I diet, but always go back to them and then the weight goes back on.

I don't do drugs, but had the occasional puff of MJ when I was younger. Being so ignorant (back then) of hard drugs and addiction, I KNOW that I would have tried them if they had been offered. I am SO thankful they weren't around back then because I probably would be an addict (if not dead by now)

When I took up smoking as a teenager, it was becoming slowly known that cigarettes were carcinogenic. I enjoyed the few smokes I had each day and always told myself that I'd quit when I got married. Then I told myself I'd quit when I had kids. Well, it didn't quite happen that way. I was hooked. Still am.

Anyways, getting around to my first sentence... I know I have a habit-forming, addictive personality.
Was I born with this? Could THIS be the difference between people who take up bad habits and those who don't?

Both of my parents smoked. Four siblings in my family. Three smoked, one didn't. Why didn't the one smoke?
My husband's parents both smoked. Two kids, neither smoked. Why?
My girlfriend's parents: one smoked, one didn't. They had five children. Four smoked. One didn't. Why?

To those of you who smoke, would you call yourself an addictive, habit-forming person?
I know I am.

To those of you who DON'T smoke, truthfully, do you have ANY habits or addictions at all?

(I'm not asking you to list them. That is your business) Just yes or no.

So I'm wondering... could it be that people are BORN with habit forming personalities? Could this be the common factor?
Iím a nail biter and hair twister due to stress. Been this way since I was a kid. Didnít know I had Aspergers, a high functioning form of autism. Gambling doesnít appeal to me at all. Was drinking heavily after my return from Desert Storm and the start of my divorce. Give up the drinking back in 1996.
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Old 05-16-2018, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,701 posts, read 3,290,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Iím a nail biter and hair twister due to stress. Been this way since I was a kid. Didnít know I had Aspergers, a high functioning form of autism. Gambling doesnít appeal to me at all. Was drinking heavily after my return from Desert Storm and the start of my divorce. Give up the drinking back in 1996.
Thanks for answering. So are you a smoker or not?
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Old 05-16-2018, 10:56 AM
 
8,363 posts, read 6,813,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gouligann View Post
Thanks for answering. So are you a smoker or not?
Never smoked.
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Old 05-16-2018, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Conservative Las Vegas
15,937 posts, read 19,186,574 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cape Cod Todd View Post
I think smoking is stupid and the people that do it are weak minded and too lazy to do the hard work it takes to quit. They all know that it is costing them a fortune and costing them years off their lives but they keep doing it.

I know several people that are now facing terrible health battles with cancer due to decades of smoking.
I caught a relative the other day sneaking a smoke. She has already had cancer not to mention all kinds of other health issues over the years yet she can't kick the butts and she has lied that she has. It is very frustrating.


It is crazy to see teens and young people smoking today with everything we know about the deadly effects of smoking.
I would say it is peer pressure that gets them going or growing up seeing their parents smoking.

What starts kids smoking? We could ask the same question of what gets them started on taking hard core drugs.
Man is a risk taker at heart. Put the key into the ignition of your car, and attempt to drive across town, we're talking big time risks. At any intersection, someone could rear end you, come flying thru a red light and you're left a paraplegic, quadriplegic, facing painful issues for ever and ever or dead. Driving/owning a car is a very dangerous addiction common to millions, and they will all claim it's a necessity, even though there may be a mass transit stop 2 blocks away.

Here's the problem. Young teenager just happens to know of an uncle, grandfather, or great grandfather who smoked for decades with no ill effects. My father smoked for 50 years, quit at 66, and died at 96 with no respiratory issues whatsoever. How many of these teenagers have run into these miracle types and decided to take the risk.

We all have our addictions, each and every one of us, addictions we're too weak minded and lazy to quit. Smartphones come to mind, how many could quit that addiction over night? And then there's workaholics (workaholics and alcoholics wear the same clothes) who are so addicted to work. they're going to an early grave repeatedly working 70-80-90 hours a week. I work with a number of those suicidal workaholics!

For those that make their own cigarettes, we're looking at roughly $2-$2.25 a pack. I've been making my own for 17 years.

As for the woman, even with cancer, who sneaks smokes, endangering her health, let's look at a comparison: A man has been in 3 car accidents in his lifetime, has spent, over the years, many years in Rehab/Physical therapy and this risk taker simply can't quit his addiction to driving a car, He sees the gory photo's of near-fatal accidents in the paper, and like the smoker: I may lucky, it's not going to happen to me.

This will be a much better world when we equivocate addictions, or someone saying: But my addiction is much safer!
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Old 05-16-2018, 11:53 AM
 
10,596 posts, read 5,027,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
Man is a risk taker at heart. Put the key into the ignition of your car, and attempt to drive across town, we're talking big time risks. At any intersection, someone could rear end you, come flying thru a red light and you're left a paraplegic, quadriplegic, facing painful issues for ever and ever or dead. Driving/owning a car is a very dangerous addiction common to millions, and they will all claim it's a necessity, even though there may be a mass transit stop 2 blocks away.

Here's the problem. Young teenager just happens to know of an uncle, grandfather, or great grandfather who smoked for decades with no ill effects. My father smoked for 50 years, quit at 66, and died at 96 with no respiratory issues whatsoever. How many of these teenagers have run into these miracle types and decided to take the risk.

We all have our addictions, each and every one of us, addictions we're too weak minded and lazy to quit. Smartphones come to mind, how many could quit that addiction over night? And then there's workaholics (workaholics and alcoholics wear the same clothes) who are so addicted to work. they're going to an early grave repeatedly working 70-80-90 hours a week. I work with a number of those suicidal workaholics!

For those that make their own cigarettes, we're looking at roughly $2-$2.25 a pack. I've been making my own for 17 years.

As for the woman, even with cancer, who sneaks smokes, endangering her health, let's look at a comparison: A man has been in 3 car accidents in his lifetime, has spent, over the years, many years in Rehab/Physical therapy and this risk taker simply can't quit his addiction to driving a car, He sees the gory photo's of near-fatal accidents in the paper, and like the smoker: I may lucky, it's not going to happen to me.

This will be a much better world when we equivocate addictions, or someone saying: But my addiction is much safer!

To equate driving a car to smoking --- Not the same thing.

Even living near a mass transit stop doesn't always negate the need to have a car to get around. In some areas, one still needs a car as mass transit doesn't blanket the local area very well. There are few places in this country where someone can get around solely using public transportation without ever needing a car. You can say, well just move to such a place. Easier said than done. For example, not everyone can afford to live someplace like NYC.

Haven't you noticed that elderly or disabled people still need to get around? Those who can't drive are dependent on those who own cars or those who operate shuttles. Should those people who drive shuttles, buses and cabs give up their livelihoods because you say driving is an addiction?
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Old 05-16-2018, 12:07 PM
 
47,725 posts, read 47,668,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Not my intention when I started this topic. It was about why people start smoking in this day and age when they know it to be extremely addictive and unhealthy. I had an uncle who was on many different drug addictions. He managed to quit the drugs and alcohol but couldn’t quit cigarettes. For those who’ve never tried tobacco or vaping nicotine, don’t try it and you won’t get addicted.
Because more important to a teenager than worrying about future health and understanding the gravity of addiction is the desire for acceptance, or to be cool.

Malcolm Gladwell covered the subject of teenage smoking pretty thoroughly in The Tipping Point.

Here's an article on that aspect of the book.

Malcolm Gladwell Teen Smoking | Why the war on smoking backfires with teens - tribunedigital-baltimoresun

I started smoking when I was a teenager myself. Did I care that smoking was considered unhealthy? Did I think about addiction? No.

I was one of those kids who was left on the outside of the normal social circles, but when I found a group of kids who seemed not to care that I wasn't pretty or athletic or in other ways up to some standard of social acceptability, they smoked cigarettes and so I started to also, to be accepted, to be a part of something.

I don't think much has changed in those 40+ years. The kids who are rejected by the mainstream social groups are going to seek validation in other ways, and sometimes, that's with the smokers. People who smoke are also higher risk-takers than those who don't.

There are also the physical benefits. Nicotine makes your mind sharper. It makes you feel better. I no longer smoke, and I noticed the difference in mental acuity right away. Stephen King mentions it in his book On Writing. He was hit by a truck and hospitalized for long time during the writing of that book and quit smoking by necessity when he was laid up, and he noticed the difference when he began to write again.

I was puzzled when people would ask, after I quit smoking, if I felt better. Well, NO. What an odd question. I knew that in the long run it would be better for my health, but smoking made me feel better, not worse.
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Old 05-16-2018, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
26,665 posts, read 42,144,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOS2IAD View Post
To equate driving a car to smoking --- Not the same thing.

Even living near a mass transit stop doesn't always negate the need to have a car to get around. In some areas, one still needs a car as mass transit doesn't blanket the local area very well. There are few places in this country where someone can get around solely using public transportation without ever needing a car. You can say, well just move to such a place. Easier said than done. For example, not everyone can afford to live someplace like NYC.

Haven't you noticed that elderly or disabled people still need to get around? Those who can't drive are dependent on those who own cars or those who operate shuttles. Should those people who drive shuttles, buses and cabs give up their livelihoods because you say driving is an addiction?
They're not saying cigarettes are as necessary as driving - just that we do it knowing the risks, and are more likely to die in a car accident than from the effects (e.g. cancer) of smoking. I know the threat of lung cancer is thrown around a lot, but in reality it's not a high risk unless you also have a family history & genetic risk for cancer. Driving, on the other hand, is of equal risk to basically everyone who gets behind the wheel. And while public transportation isn't an easy option for everyone, there is always SOME option besides driving. You can ride a bike, walk, take the bus or train, or simply not leave your house/neighborhood as often. People do manage without cars, even in rural areas! But we give up safety for convenience, so it's a valid comparison of "risk vs reward" in this case.

Life has risks, unless you plan to live in a bubble 24/7. And while smokers are an easy scapegoat, nobody here can claim they've never done anything unhealthy or potentially dangerous. Nobody.
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