U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 05-28-2018, 02:24 PM
 
3,170 posts, read 892,562 times
Reputation: 2554

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
But we're (you're) not concerned with those who LIKE exercise, correct? How about using your knowledge of human motivation to motivate those who don't like exercise? It's not good enough to prove that some people love exercise - that has no influence whatsoever in convincing others that they should as well.
My point was that you are incorrect in saying it is natural to dislike exercise.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-28-2018, 02:30 PM
 
3,170 posts, read 892,562 times
Reputation: 2554
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
It's not an association, it's a component.

Abdominal obesity is a defining criterion for metabolic syndrome.

"Thin" people do not "often" qualify for a label of metabolic syndrome, though they could if they have hypertension, lipid abnormalities, and elevated blood sugars.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15333488

"Depending on ethnicity and sex, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased in a graded fashion from 0.9-3.0% at BMI 18.5-20.9 kg/m(2) to 9.6-22.5% at BMI 25.0-26.9 kg/m."

Therefore the risk of metabolic syndrome in someone who is "thin", with a BMI at the low end of healthy weight, is about 1% to 3%.

Underweight: BMI is less than 18.5.
Healthy weight: BMI is 18.5 to 24.9.
Overweight: BMI is 25 to 29.9.
Obese: BMI is 30 or higher

As weight goes up, so does the risk of qualifying for a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, because being overweight is a risk factor for the other components of metabolic syndrome: hypertension, elevated blood sugar, and abnormal lipids.

https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/484166_1

"Introduced as Syndrome X by Reaven in 1988 and also termed insulin resistance syndrome, metabolic syndrome is recognized clinically by the findings of abdominal obesity, elevated triglycerides, atherogenic dyslipidemia ie, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), elevated blood pressure, high blood glucose and/or insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome is also characterized by a prothromobotic state and a proinflammatory state."

"Weight gain predisposes individuals to 2 pivotal components of metabolic syndrome: obesity and insulin resistance. Therefore, the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome is largely attributed to the alarmingly high and increasing prevalence of obesity across the world and across demographic groups in the United States ..."
There is also an association between obesity and the modern lifestyle, of refined carbohydrates and inactivity. So the refined carbohydrates and inactivity might be causing both the obesity and the diabetes.

It is not nearly as simple as you think. And it might be different for different individuals.

And it seems like you are just trying to find ways to deny the importance of avoiding carbohydrates, and of getting enough exercise.

Focusing on obesity is good for the drug companies, but bad for the patients. They usually fail to lose weight permanently by restricting calories, so their MDs feel it's necessary to give them drugs.

It seems like you just want to deny this.

If someone is pre-diabetic and has metabolic syndrome, their system is out of balance. They can restore the balance by avoiding processed food and by exercising. Gradually, their system will recover its balance and they will return to normal weight, without restricting calories.

The insistence on losing weight might be the reason the epidemic keeps getting worse. The harder someone tries to lose weight by limiting calories, the more their metabolism slows and the worse the syndrome becomes.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
27,327 posts, read 17,525,976 times
Reputation: 39723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
My point was that you are incorrect in saying it is natural to dislike exercise.

I find it is exceptionally common not to like exercise.
__________________
____________________________________________
My posts as a Mod will always be in red.
Be sure to review Terms of Service: TOS
And check this out: FAQ
Moderator: Relationships Forum / Hawaii Forum (on loan)
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 03:07 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,129 posts, read 6,301,171 times
Reputation: 12644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
I find it is exceptionally common not to like exercise.

That's me for sure. I'd much rather sit and binge watch my favorite series and movies on Netflix and the like, and eat bon bons, if I had my druthers and it didn't matter. Not even sure I'd like flapping my arms to get the cardio up while I do that ( as one poster mentioned, IIRC) as that would make it too hard to get the bon bons in my mouth.



But I'd feel miserable all around so I'll exercise and watch what I eat instead.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 03:47 PM
 
4,010 posts, read 1,685,428 times
Reputation: 11414
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
That's me for sure. I'd much rather sit and binge watch my favorite series and movies on Netflix and the like, and eat bon bons, if I had my druthers and it didn't matter. Not even sure I'd like flapping my arms to get the cardio up while I do that ( as one poster mentioned, IIRC) as that would make it too hard to get the bon bons in my mouth.



But I'd feel miserable all around so I'll exercise and watch what I eat instead.
Please stop using common sense.

Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 04:20 PM
 
220 posts, read 61,413 times
Reputation: 484
I had a sedentary job for the last 20 years of my life before I retired. I knew sitting all the time was killing me but I worked odd hours, and had been in 3 car accidents (none my fault) and when I did exercises it would always end up causing me pain for weeks afterwards. I tried different things but all ended up hurting me. Even walking hurt my back. Riding a bike hurt my neck. Lifting even light weights hurt me. Etc...

I gave up. Could I have found SOMEthing I could do? Maybe, but there's also another problem which is why people don't exercise: They don't enjoy it!

Now, I used to exercise before the car accidents and I did it because I enjoyed riding my bike! It felt great and was great fun to ride my bicycle. Later as I said, it hurt my back/neck/shoulders so I had to quit.

So... I put on 35 extra pounds by sitting ALL the time. My wife would try to get me to walk some and I'd do it but I didn't enjoy it because we lived in the city and walking in the city didn't appeal to me. I like nature.
Did not want to DRIVE somewhere to walk, either...

Long story shorter:

When I retired we moved to a large piece of land. It was very wild and we needed to tame it, cut jungle type vines, plant grass and bushes and flowers and trees and we built our own home. So between the large property and the house there are always things to do.

Within 6 months of living "out in the country" I lost the 35 lbs! I did no "exercise". I just worked outside, planting, watering, fertilizing, digging, walking, cutting limbs, carrying limbs away, etc etc.

THE LESSON HERE:

Exercise has to be something enjoyable that is part of your lifestyle or you likely will not stay with it and you will not keep the weight off and remain healthy from physical activity. (Same is true of diet. You have to make a healthy diet part of your lifestyle. Though honestly I eat fairly healthy but am not a fanatic about it; it was more the physical activity daily that made the difference!)

I eat the same diet (maybe worse) than I did when I put on the 35lb. But it's the active lifestyle, working outside that made all the difference for me.

2 and 1/2 years later, I have maintained my normal weight. Without "trying". No "excercise", just working at things I enjoy doing.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,390 posts, read 25,975,211 times
Reputation: 26304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
There is also an association between obesity and the modern lifestyle, of refined carbohydrates and inactivity. So the refined carbohydrates and inactivity might be causing both the obesity and the diabetes.

It is not nearly as simple as you think. And it might be different for different individuals.

And it seems like you are just trying to find ways to deny the importance of avoiding carbohydrates, and of getting enough exercise.

Focusing on obesity is good for the drug companies, but bad for the patients. They usually fail to lose weight permanently by restricting calories, so their MDs feel it's necessary to give them drugs.

It seems like you just want to deny this.

If someone is pre-diabetic and has metabolic syndrome, their system is out of balance. They can restore the balance by avoiding processed food and by exercising. Gradually, their system will recover its balance and they will return to normal weight, without restricting calories.

The insistence on losing weight might be the reason the epidemic keeps getting worse. The harder someone tries to lose weight by limiting calories, the more their metabolism slows and the worse the syndrome becomes.
Sorry, but calories do count. No matter what you eat - carbs, protein, or fat - if you eat more than you burn for your personal energy requirement, you will gain weight. Guaranteed.

Consume less than you expend and you will lose weight. Guaranteed.

Exercise can help increase the net energy deficit and help lose weight, but the calorie deficit must be achieved. Lowering intake by 500 calories per day or burning an extra 500 calories per day with exercise will cause weight loss, as long as that 500 calories is 500 calories less than you burn each day. Doing both will accelerate the loss.

Significant slowing of metabolism does not happen unless calories are restricted too much. It can be countered by maintaining protein intake - and exercise, including some weight lifting, to maintain muscle mass.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...-mode#section2

Like I have been saying all along, both diet (but not just simple sugar) and exercise are important.
Someone with metabolic syndrome must lose intra-abdominal fat in order to improve the metabolic dysfunction, fundamentally insulin resistance. That is not going to happen without creating a calorie deficit, with diet and exercise.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 08:22 PM
 
3,170 posts, read 892,562 times
Reputation: 2554
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
I find it is exceptionally common not to like exercise.
It is very common, obviously, or more people would be doing it. I said it is not NATURAL to dislike exercise, I didn't say it is not common. And I gave a reasonable explanation of why it is common to dislike it.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 08:29 PM
 
3,170 posts, read 892,562 times
Reputation: 2554
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Sorry, but calories do count. No matter what you eat - carbs, protein, or fat - if you eat more than you burn for your personal energy requirement, you will gain weight. Guaranteed.

Consume less than you expend and you will lose weight. Guaranteed.

Exercise can help increase the net energy deficit and help lose weight, but the calorie deficit must be achieved. Lowering intake by 500 calories per day or burning an extra 500 calories per day with exercise will cause weight loss, as long as that 500 calories is 500 calories less than you burn each day. Doing both will accelerate the loss.

Significant slowing of metabolism does not happen unless calories are restricted too much. It can be countered by maintaining protein intake - and exercise, including some weight lifting, to maintain muscle mass.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...-mode#section2

Like I have been saying all along, both diet (but not just simple sugar) and exercise are important.
Someone with metabolic syndrome must lose intra-abdominal fat in order to improve the metabolic dysfunction, fundamentally insulin resistance. That is not going to happen without creating a calorie deficit, with diet and exercise.
Maybe you could read the post right above yours. They lost 35 pounds without dieting, just by being active and doing outside work.

Maybe you could listen to what people say about exercise and weight loss, instead of only believing the "experts."

Creating a calorie deficit makes you hungry, and when you are hungry you want to eat. When you are hungry you feel weak and you don't want to exercise. And the metabolism slows, so you have to eat even less.

It is an unfortunate myth that you must create a calorie deficit to lose weight, and it is harming millions.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Central IL
13,271 posts, read 7,059,798 times
Reputation: 30840
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
No one said exercise alone will prevent metabolic syndrome, and you know it. We said that diet matters also.

But you are wrong about weight control, as I have already explained. A very large number of normal weight people have metabolic syndrome. Therefore, being overweight cannot be a necessary cause.

Also, as I have explained, losing weight by restricting calories, as MDs usually recommend, is almost impossible for most patients. Therefore, they almost certainly fail at it, and are given drugs.

Exercise alone will help a lot in preventing metabolic syndrome -- not for everyone, but for many. Enough exercise plus avoiding processed food will prevent metabolic syndrome for most.

But we don't know how much exercise is enough.
People fail by not restricting calories...yes. People also fail by not exercising. And people fail by not doing either. People fail A LOT at losing weight. THAT is why they are given drugs.

Do you want people to prove the efforts they've made before they are given drugs? Doctors can lead horses to water but can't make them drink. Watching your diet and moving more require effort - some people do not or cannot do what is necessary or all that is necessary. If we want to morally judge people before we allow them "the easy" way (or medically necessary way, in their case) of taking drugs then you'll have to help set up this system.

Shaming people is seldom effective - get creative and share your ideas, please.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top