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View Poll Results: After reading the OP in full, what is your take on the current state of pain medication prescription
Pain relief medications are "too severely restricted" for legitimate patients? 120 71.86%
Pain relief medications restrictions are “where they should be” for legitimate pain patients? 20 11.98%
Pain relief medications restrictions are “not restricted enough” for legitimate pain patients? 27 16.17%
Voters: 167. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-03-2018, 12:59 PM
 
12,888 posts, read 15,367,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post

Unfortunately our generations worked themselves so much that our bodies are broken.
Yes....and payed taxes and medical premiums for decades.
Now that we need pain relief that works, it's sooo very wrong to deny us.
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Old 12-10-2018, 11:36 PM
 
433 posts, read 247,944 times
Reputation: 604
Interesting article for Kathryn and others to read that I just read:

"As doctors taper or end opioid prescriptions, many patients driven to despair, suicide"

https://www.foxnews.com/health/as-op...any-to-suicide

"We have a terrible problem, we have people committing suicide for no other reason than being forced to stop opioids, pain medication, for chronic pain. It’s mass hysteria, a witch hunt. It’s one of the worst health care crises in our history. There are 5 to 7 million people being tortured on purpose."
— Dr. Thomas Kline, former Harvard Medical School program administrator

"The CDC guidelines...have been hijacked and weaponized as an excuse for draconian legislation."
— Michael Schatman, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Pain

Political leaders and government officials often failed to note the bulk -- at least 60 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services -- of the overdose epidemic was caused by illicit drugs, not prescription painkillers."

"We’re targeting the most vulnerable and sickest people who have been on opioids a long time,” said Dr. Stefan Kertesz, an addiction specialist and professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. “Insurers are issuing rules that say we won’t cover long-term opioids for anyone over 90 milligrams. Well, five percent of people who receive opioids account for 60 percent of the milligrams prescribed. With so many milligrams going to a tiny group of very sick people, if you can knock a few people off these opioids you can show a big numeric reduction.”

“What we’re really doing is dragging down the dose on the most disabled people,” said Kertesz, who sits on several state opioid safety committees. “Prescription control seems an easy answer to the epidemic, but that’s not stopping addiction.”

I share the nation’s concern that more than 100 people a day die of an overdose. But my patient nearly died of an under-dose,” said McAneny, the AMA president.

“My patient suffered, in part, because of the crackdown on opioids… When I visited my patient in the hospital as he was recovering from his suicide attempt, I apologized for not knowing his medication was denied," McAneny said. "I felt I had failed him.”
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Old 12-15-2018, 07:16 AM
 
Location: NJ
10,615 posts, read 21,275,502 times
Reputation: 8646
Quote:
Originally Posted by txbullsfan View Post
Interesting article for Kathryn and others to read that I just read:

"As doctors taper or end opioid prescriptions, many patients driven to despair, suicide"

https://www.foxnews.com/health/as-op...any-to-suicide

"We have a terrible problem, we have people committing suicide for no other reason than being forced to stop opioids, pain medication, for chronic pain. It’s mass hysteria, a witch hunt. It’s one of the worst health care crises in our history. There are 5 to 7 million people being tortured on purpose."
— Dr. Thomas Kline, former Harvard Medical School program administrator

"The CDC guidelines...have been hijacked and weaponized as an excuse for draconian legislation."
— Michael Schatman, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Pain

Political leaders and government officials often failed to note the bulk -- at least 60 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services -- of the overdose epidemic was caused by illicit drugs, not prescription painkillers."

"We’re targeting the most vulnerable and sickest people who have been on opioids a long time,” said Dr. Stefan Kertesz, an addiction specialist and professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine. “Insurers are issuing rules that say we won’t cover long-term opioids for anyone over 90 milligrams. Well, five percent of people who receive opioids account for 60 percent of the milligrams prescribed. With so many milligrams going to a tiny group of very sick people, if you can knock a few people off these opioids you can show a big numeric reduction.”

“What we’re really doing is dragging down the dose on the most disabled people,” said Kertesz, who sits on several state opioid safety committees. “Prescription control seems an easy answer to the epidemic, but that’s not stopping addiction.”

I share the nation’s concern that more than 100 people a day die of an overdose. But my patient nearly died of an under-dose,” said McAneny, the AMA president.

“My patient suffered, in part, because of the crackdown on opioids… When I visited my patient in the hospital as he was recovering from his suicide attempt, I apologized for not knowing his medication was denied," McAneny said. "I felt I had failed him.”
Thanks for posting the article. Seems a lot of people are denying why meds are being cut or that's what I got from it; some saying it's the government while others say it's the various states with their own laws and others are saying insurances will be the front runner come 2019 when Medicare's new policy takes effect.

I'm seeing something I don't understand. It says "The CDC guidelines were geared to primary care doctors" do they mean family doctors or pain management doctors? It reads like they mean family doctors who I thought were not allowed to take on pain patients any more and that they can prescribe short term but a pain med script going on say week 4 would then need to go to pain management because then it's considered chronic.

Quote:
“We believe everyone deserves effective pain management,” she said. “The CDC guidelines are not a regulation or a law – it’s guidance for providers.”

“It never made a recommendation to take people off medication involuntarily, or to taper down involuntary," she said. "It was meant to provide updated guidance about the benefits and risks of opioids for chronic pain so that the provider and the patient – together – could make decisions.”
Quote:
Either in response to the CDC guidelines or as proactive measure to deal with the opioid crisis on their own, at least 33 states have enacted some type of legislation related to prescription limits, according to the National Conference of State Legislators. Health care providers and pain patients who have Medicare prescription plans are bracing for January, when the federal insurance program will give its insurers and pharmacists the authority to reject prescriptions that deviate from CDC recommended dosage.

“The CDC guidelines were geared to primary care doctors, but they have been hijacked and weaponized as an excuse for draconian legislation,” said Michael Schatman, a clinical psychologist and director of research and development at Boston Pain Care, a multi-disciplinary pain clinic, and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Pain Research. “Illicit opioids, not prescription opioids, are driving overdose deaths.”
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Old 12-15-2018, 07:47 AM
 
433 posts, read 247,944 times
Reputation: 604
One of the multiple points of the article is that suicide is very closely related to exceeding tolerable pain thresholds for an unsustainable amount of time. As these tolerable pain thresholds are exceeded, suicides increase. Also, a big point of the article is that suicides due to chronic pain are significantly under reported.

If the pendulum has swung to far in the other direction (exceedingly heavy handed approach of denying chronic pain patients needed medication) and you know someone who has completed, attempted or is considering suicide because of chronic pain, please have them (or you) report it as such. Sadly, the only thing the government will listen too is statistics, not stories or speculation.
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Old 12-15-2018, 03:08 PM
 
Location: NJ
10,615 posts, read 21,275,502 times
Reputation: 8646
Has anyone followed the thread Married Fox TV meteorologist mother-of-two who hung herself after LASIK eye surgery.? Seems she's one of a few that killed themselves over chronic pain

Married Fox TV meteorologist mother-of-two who hanged herself is among 'at least 11 people' who have committed suicide after Lasik eye surgery
* Jessica Starr, 35, committed suicide on Wednesday in Detroit, Michigan
* In October Canadian father-of-two Paul Fitzpatrick, 56, killed himself and blamed 20 years of agonizing post-Lasik pain in his suicide note
* Paula Cofer, the founder of a support group called Lasik Complications, claims at least 10 others in the US have committed suicide amid post-surgery pain
* It remains unclear if Starr's suicide was directly related to her surgery
* She told fans she was struggling and that her she had to use eye drops in November
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Old 01-19-2019, 06:13 AM
 
Location: NJ
10,615 posts, read 21,275,502 times
Reputation: 8646
Anyone have any new stories to share after the new year? Thankfully my scripts filled fine

By the way, there is another post on the same topic if anyone wants to jump over. I tried to get some of them here but none did.

The war on pain patients
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Old 05-08-2019, 07:19 PM
 
4,417 posts, read 2,579,932 times
Reputation: 10268
I am switching from the pain clinic back to my GP.

He and i discussed it.

He said he'd be flagged for prescribing my oxymorphone and oxycodone as he has moved to a new medical organization.

He said he knows I've been taking these fir years ( hes tge one who actually started me on them years ago..about a decade ago); he knows I'm not addicted; he knows I'm not selling them, etc.

I was just in the hospital Monday to Wednesday ( today) i was surprised they actually allowed me my oxycodone!!! They didnt carry the oxymorphone the nurse said ( funny i get it from the hospital pharmacy). But i was greatful for the oxycodone.

The man in the room with me is 6 years older than, has degenerative disc disease too, and they would give him muscle relaxers, but NO OPIODS for his pain, and he was bone on bone crushing his nerves to his legs. Most of tge tine he moaned and groaned. Apparently he'd NOT been on opiods before, so they weren't going to give it to him! He had reached a point that my neurosurgeon showed up to eval him ( he was confused when he saw me!) But the roommate refused surgery! So he wasnt goibg to get much help as a "new patient " in the way of pain relief beyond otc.
I felt for him, and really wanted to tell him he should allow the neurosurgeon to do his stuff...hes tge best in the area without going to Syracuse or NYC. But it was none of my business to tell him anything, especially if yes refusing.

As long as i can get my scripts ( athough now they are only allowed to prescribe so many a moth and i have to avoid taking them on good days), i can deal.

Its sad that a few are on e again ruining it for the many.

And ive said before that its the illegal drug ODs they are blaming on prescription drugs, because they gravitate to to tge illegal uncontrolled drugs that is the problem.

Ive never had a desire to try illegal drugs but if i cant get relief through prescription i MAY be willing to try! That would create a whole new problem!!!

Grr.

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Old 05-08-2019, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
31,375 posts, read 19,780,387 times
Reputation: 45194
My RA doc had me start going to a Pain Mgmt Clinic so he doesn't have to deal with the liability of pain killers, and I only take Tramadol.

The first one he referred me to they lead the conversation with "we do NO prescribing, we only do injections), well that doesn't help, and my dr. agreed, so I went to another and actually he was really good.

I keep my current Rx, and we discussed TENS, diet (turmeric/ginger), yoga and all that good stuff. While I'm not happy to add another doc, I like this guy.
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Old 05-09-2019, 01:36 PM
 
10,265 posts, read 2,624,271 times
Reputation: 6996
Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
I am switching from the pain clinic back to my GP.

He and i discussed it.

He said he'd be flagged for prescribing my oxymorphone and oxycodone as he has moved to a new medical organization.

He said he knows I've been taking these fir years ( hes tge one who actually started me on them years ago..about a decade ago); he knows I'm not addicted; he knows I'm not selling them, etc.

I was just in the hospital Monday to Wednesday ( today) i was surprised they actually allowed me my oxycodone!!! They didnt carry the oxymorphone the nurse said ( funny i get it from the hospital pharmacy). But i was greatful for the oxycodone.

The man in the room with me is 6 years older than, has degenerative disc disease too, and they would give him muscle relaxers, but NO OPIODS for his pain, and he was bone on bone crushing his nerves to his legs. Most of tge tine he moaned and groaned. Apparently he'd NOT been on opiods before, so they weren't going to give it to him! He had reached a point that my neurosurgeon showed up to eval him ( he was confused when he saw me!) But the roommate refused surgery! So he wasnt goibg to get much help as a "new patient " in the way of pain relief beyond otc.
I felt for him, and really wanted to tell him he should allow the neurosurgeon to do his stuff...hes tge best in the area without going to Syracuse or NYC. But it was none of my business to tell him anything, especially if yes refusing.

As long as i can get my scripts ( athough now they are only allowed to prescribe so many a moth and i have to avoid taking them on good days), i can deal.

Its sad that a few are on e again ruining it for the many.

And ive said before that its the illegal drug ODs they are blaming on prescription drugs, because they gravitate to to tge illegal uncontrolled drugs that is the problem.

Ive never had a desire to try illegal drugs but if i cant get relief through prescription i MAY be willing to try! That would create a whole new problem!!!

Grr.

Sadly, this was the goal...back when doctors were prescribing opioids left and right (mostly unrestricted), this was diverting ALOT of business and money away from the drug cartels, addicts didnt need the corner drug dealer anymore, they could just call their doctor or go into the ER and complain of a bad back and get a 30 day supply of Percoets!!


Thats why we saw the DEA act SO quickly to crack down on this, the cartels were loosing money.


Although now, today, we have heroin epidemics instead of painkiller epidemics! LOL What surprises me most about all this, is the 'Big pharma' industry just sat back and accepted this crack down (on their hottest selling drugs at the time), everyone says how big and powerful the pharma industry is, but in this case, they allowed the govt to come in and throw a wrench into a HUGE cash cow...generally when an industry has power or influence, they make it easier for customers to get their products (not harder).


IF I were you, I would file a suit against the DEA, unless you SPECIFICALLY listed them as being able to know what prescriptions were are taking, they are violating your Hipa rights (just knowing what your doctor prescribed to you), only your doctor and those you allow, are permitted to have access to this information.

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Old 05-09-2019, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
36,980 posts, read 45,424,471 times
Reputation: 61483
Since I last responded, I’ve had bunion surgery and took OxyContin every 4-6 hours for about 3 days. Then I didn’t need it any more. The opiates are not intended for chronic pain.

The PA explained that when taken long term, opiates stop being effective. They are only intended for short term use. People start taking too much, and they stop breathing and die. My surgeon only prescribed enough for a week, but I did not use them all.

Now, I’m about to have another knee replacement. I will take those puppies around the clock for 3-4 days, but then I’ll switch to a non narcotic.

I realize how hard it is to live in pain, because I have been. Nothing, including 3 x 800mgs a day of ibuprofen, or Celebrex, or Tramadol keep me pain free, so I’m opting to have surgery to fix the source. I really don’t know what chronic pain sufferers are supposed to do.
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