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Old 06-19-2018, 07:50 AM
 
5,551 posts, read 3,137,927 times
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We had a friend who died of heart disease in his 50's, as did his Dad and Brother who were in their 40's. Yes, I would consider it to be genetic especially given their ages.

Similar situation to his wife who died in her 50's from breast cancer, as did her Grandma, Mom, and Aunt. Again, genetic pre-disposition.

No family history, then lifestyle is probably the cause.

 
Old 06-19-2018, 08:31 AM
 
554 posts, read 212,051 times
Reputation: 603
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
When I was in high school the kid I was dating had heart problems. I know people want to feel in control, but sometimes, no matter WHAT you do, how you were born wins out.

My husband's co-worker was in great physical shape (40s), he had just passed the FBI physical fitness test, which is very hard. He died of heart attack on running laps at his regular job.

Really? A doctor didn't mention carbs in relation to diabetes? I find that incredibly hard to believe.

You keep coming up with stories where "doctors and people" believe these really weird things.

Again, I have never met a doctor who did not advise dietary changes and exercise for a wide range of medical conditions, and even if you have none.
I can believe it. My grandma is early 90's. After having no issues related to diabetes for her whole life she has started having elevated blood sugar. Her doctor put her on medicine and did not do any type of diet counseling despite the fact that minor elevations can be addressed that way. My mom has been trying to educate her about carbs and diabetes link but I honestly believe that my grandma discounts it because it is not coming from her physician. We have tried to get her to change primary care doctors but she is adverse because she has been going to the same one for years.
 
Old 06-19-2018, 09:47 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,056 posts, read 6,239,159 times
Reputation: 12507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jo48 View Post
My husband does not have a family history of heart attacks. His parents died from cancer. His sister died from dementia last year. Both his aunts had heart attacks, but they were in their 80's. That does not count as it being genetic because of their advanced age.

The first time he was in the hospital the cardiologist told him he had to exercise. "I don't care if you walk around this room 100 times it is still exercise. Doctor called a nurse to help him walk down the hallways. Exercise all stops leaving the hospital?

Diet. Three weeks ago when he was back in the hospital I had a little talk with the nurse. My husband thinks because of the medications he takes that will save him from having another heart attack. Obviously NOT. He thinks that he can sit in his recliner in front of the TV for hours, only getting up for the bathroom and getting snacks to eat. It doesn't matter how much "kale" dinners I make, if he is going out every day for lunch eating hot dogs, pizza, and Big Macs. All the kale in the world won't help against fast food, and no exercise, every day. When he was released from the hospital, this nurse wrote in a red marker on his discharge papers, "No more hot dogs".

Just as "a doctor cannot put a gun to a patient's head", a wife cannot do it either. Hopefully, the 2nd time around will knock some sense into my husband. He is the only one who can change his lifestyle. Medications are not the ONLY solution.
You're absolutely right, and I'm sorry you're having to watch your husband ignore or rationalize against the advice he's been repeatedly given by the healthcare professionals caring for him, and disregarding the support and encouragement you are giving to him to maintain a healthier lifestyle. I can imagine how frustrating this must be to you.

I don't know what it would take to wake up those who have decided they won't do what it takes in the way of lifestyle activities to maintain their cardiac and general health. They don't seem to realize these are just as important (maybe more so in some cases), as the medication.
 
Old 06-19-2018, 10:10 AM
 
2,892 posts, read 838,193 times
Reputation: 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
That is not an explanation. It is your opinion, based on what appears to be a couple of personal encounters.

Where is the evidence to support your belief that your anecdotal experience is representative of all US physicians?
I wasn't talking about my experience. I have explained to you many times what is wrong with the standard lifestyle advice. For example, 90 minutes of exercise per week, low-fat diets, and counting calories.


Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
What is "a healthy balance" and how do you "return" to it?

Why do healthy people who do not think about calories gain weight?
I have explained to you what I mean by a healthy balance, many times.

Healthy people with a good lifestyle do not normally gain weight.
 
Old 06-19-2018, 10:11 AM
 
2,892 posts, read 838,193 times
Reputation: 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Pray tell, what kind of "doctor" with what credentials do you trust? Seriously, I'd love to know - you demonize pretty much all health care providers now that you've also include naturopaths. Keep doctor shopping until you find one that tells you what you want to hear.

And again -
Is the doctor supposed to stand there with a gun to your head while you eat kale running 10 miles on a treadmill? How do they decide if you've worked hard enough to get to take the "easy" way out and swallow a pill? What do YOU propose the doctor do? Why don't you write up a persuasive treatise on the subject and stand outside as many doctors offices as you can and hand them out.
We don't have to have blind faith in any kind of doctor. We have the right to think.
 
Old 06-19-2018, 10:15 AM
 
2,892 posts, read 838,193 times
Reputation: 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by LLCNYC View Post
Google? You surely jest.
Don't use google then. Have blind faith in your medical doctors.

You know, before google I went to the libraries. Are you against libraries also?
 
Old 06-19-2018, 10:24 AM
 
2,892 posts, read 838,193 times
Reputation: 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
You're absolutely right, and I'm sorry you're having to watch your husband ignore or rationalize against the advice he's been repeatedly given by the healthcare professionals caring for him, and disregarding the support and encouragement you are giving to him to maintain a healthier lifestyle. I can imagine how frustrating this must be to you.

I don't know what it would take to wake up those who have decided they won't do what it takes in the way of lifestyle activities to maintain their cardiac and general health. They don't seem to realize these are just as important (maybe more so in some cases), as the medication.
Saying that lifestyle is as important, sometimes more so, as medications is an example of how we have been misinformed.

Medications, drugs, do not improve your health. Artificial chemicals are almost always harmful, if taken long enough. And combinations of these chemicals, over long periods, have unknown results.

Heart disease patients might need blood thinners, cholesterol lowering drugs, etc., to prevent another heart attack. I don't know. But all those drugs will contribute to other serious problems.

It is extremely important to improve lifestyle as much as possible, so the drugs can be decreased, if not stopped.
 
Old 06-19-2018, 10:30 AM
 
2,892 posts, read 838,193 times
Reputation: 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jo48 View Post
We had a friend who died of heart disease in his 50's, as did his Dad and Brother who were in their 40's. Yes, I would consider it to be genetic especially given their ages.

Similar situation to his wife who died in her 50's from breast cancer, as did her Grandma, Mom, and Aunt. Again, genetic pre-disposition.

No family history, then lifestyle is probably the cause.
Even when there is family history for a disease, lifestyle can still be involved. If your relatives died from heart disease or cancer, and had the typical American lifestyle, it probably is not simply genetic.

Most of the time both genetics and lifestyle are involved.

Merko, the guy this post was originally about, keeps telling me his father died from a heart attack, and his brother also has heart disease, and therefore the fact that Merko has heart disease is entirely genetic.

I keep telling Merko that genetics could be involved, but it's probably mostly lifestyle. His father, his brother, and Merko himself, all had very unhealthy lifestyles.

Now Merko has improved his lifestyle by eating low fat cheese and egg whites, and no red meat -- all for nothing because that won't do anything for heart disease.

Merko sometimes uses the lawn mower you have to push, and sometimes walks the dog down to the corner. He considers that to be enough exercise.

His doctor assures him the drugs will protect his health, so Merko isn't worried.
 
Old 06-19-2018, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,082 posts, read 6,924,841 times
Reputation: 30345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
We don't have to have blind faith in any kind of doctor. We have the right to think.
But YOU are the one blaming doctors - you keep saying that they don't talk about exercise to their patients and then when they do but patients don't follow along you STILL blame the doctor.

What you really mean is that you don't like doctors and you'll make up reasons to show that they are just plain wrong. Be honest, at least.
 
Old 06-19-2018, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,250 posts, read 25,763,271 times
Reputation: 26086
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
I wasn't talking about my experience. I have explained to you many times what is wrong with the standard lifestyle advice. For example, 90 minutes of exercise per week, low-fat diets, and counting calories.
Current dietary advice is to avoid trans fat. I have no idea what you think a "low fat" diet is. Moderation of fat intake is necessary in order to avoid consuming too much energy, which can lead to weight gain. It is possible to lower food intake without formally counting calories. If someone needs to lose weight then consuming less energy than is expended is the only way to do it.

The most commonly prescribed diet for reducing heart disease is the Mediterranean diet. It emphasizes vegetables, limits red meat, and uses healthy fats - in moderation. The quantity of food must be adjusted to achieve and maintain a healthy weight.

Quote:
I have explained to you what I mean by a healthy balance, many times.
For the readers here please explain step by step how to achieve a "healthy balance".

Quote:
Healthy people with a good lifestyle do not normally gain weight.
They will not as long as they do not consume more calories than they expend for their body's energy needs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
Saying that lifestyle is as important, sometimes more so, as medications is an example of how we have been misinformed.

Medications, drugs, do not improve your health. Artificial chemicals are almost always harmful, if taken long enough. And combinations of these chemicals, over long periods, have unknown results.

Heart disease patients might need blood thinners, cholesterol lowering drugs, etc., to prevent another heart attack. I don't know. But all those drugs will contribute to other serious problems.

It is extremely important to improve lifestyle as much as possible, so the drugs can be decreased, if not stopped.
In the first sentence you say that saying lifestyle is important is misinformation and in the last one you say it is important. Which is it?

Yes, drugs can have side effects. However, they do not get used if the benefits do not exceed the risks. If they were "almost always harmful" they would never get approved. We do know about drug interactions, so saying they "have unknown results" is false, as is the categorical statement that "all those drugs will contribute to other serious problems."

You again have strung together a list of personal opinions which you are trying to pass off as facts.

Yes, people who have had one heart attack can take medications, including statins, to reduce the risk of another.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
His doctor assures him the drugs will protect his health, so Merko isn't worried.
You went to the doctor with Merko? If not, you do not know what assurances his doctor gave him, do you? Perhaps Merko is just not willing to do what his doctor recommends, like Jo's husband.
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