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Old 06-18-2018, 10:31 AM
 
3,202 posts, read 902,769 times
Reputation: 2561

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I know someone (his name is Merko) who has heart disease -- he keeps telling me it's genetic, and I keep telling him genetics is part of everything, but usually only a small part. I try to convince him that lifestyle is much more important, but he won't believe it, and won't improve his lifestyle. I think his MD has reinforced the idea that it's genetic, just because Merko's father died relatively young from a heart attack.

Merko takes a pile of prescription drugs, which his cardiologist says will keep him safe from another heart attack.

Merko has pre-diabetes, but won't believe me it results from lack of exercise and eating carbohydrates. His doctor said to avoid fat, but never mentioned carbohydrates. I don't know if his doctor mentioned exercise but I doubt it -- Merko trusts his doctor and probably would get enough exercise if his doctor had said it's really important. But the main message from his doctor was that the drugs will keep him safe.

Merko's father had diabetes -- Merko doesn't know if it was type 1 or 2. I told him it was probably type 2, and probably resulted from a typical American lifestyle, of no exercise and a high carbohydrate diet.

I am mentioning Merko here because I think lots of Americans have similar beliefs, possibly reinforced by their MDs.

People are often told their health problems are mainly genetic and lifestyle is secondary. Well yes, someone might smoke ten packs of cigarettes a day and eat only twinkies, and stay healthy until age 90. It can happen, possibly, but it is extremely unlikely.

I really think the emphasis on genetics is very harmful. Diseases that are primarily genetic are rare, and it is misleading to tell someone with type 2 diabetes or heart disease that it's genetic.

Merko might never have another heart attack, since his blood is kept thin by drugs. However, pre-diabetes can lead to all kinds of circulation problems, and can increase the odds of getting cancer and dementia.

 
Old 06-18-2018, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
27,342 posts, read 17,563,569 times
Reputation: 39773
When I was in high school the kid I was dating had heart problems. I know people want to feel in control, but sometimes, no matter WHAT you do, how you were born wins out.

My husband's co-worker was in great physical shape (40s), he had just passed the FBI physical fitness test, which is very hard. He died of heart attack on running laps at his regular job.

Really? A doctor didn't mention carbs in relation to diabetes? I find that incredibly hard to believe.

You keep coming up with stories where "doctors and people" believe these really weird things.

Again, I have never met a doctor who did not advise dietary changes and exercise for a wide range of medical conditions, and even if you have none.
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Old 06-18-2018, 10:48 AM
 
18,604 posts, read 6,072,347 times
Reputation: 12596
I'm sure genetics plays a large part and lifestyle major as well. A friend was born and raised in a family of smokers and she has been on heart meds for years and she did smoke too for many years. The damage was done. At 82, she says she is the longest living person in her family.

My father was so ready to die when he was 95 and his heart just would not stop. It finally did and he was in final peace.

My heart seems fine at close to 80 and I do believe my antioxidant does a good job with keeping my blood thin.
 
Old 06-18-2018, 10:59 AM
 
709 posts, read 165,079 times
Reputation: 1968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
I know someone (his name is Merko) who has heart disease -- he keeps telling me it's genetic, and I keep telling him genetics is part of everything, but usually only a small part. I try to convince him that lifestyle is much more important, but he won't believe it, and won't improve his lifestyle. I think his MD has reinforced the idea that it's genetic, just because Merko's father died relatively young from a heart attack.

Merko takes a pile of prescription drugs, which his cardiologist says will keep him safe from another heart attack.

Merko has pre-diabetes, but won't believe me it results from lack of exercise and eating carbohydrates. His doctor said to avoid fat, but never mentioned carbohydrates. I don't know if his doctor mentioned exercise but I doubt it -- Merko trusts his doctor and probably would get enough exercise if his doctor had said it's really important. But the main message from his doctor was that the drugs will keep him safe.

Merko's father had diabetes -- Merko doesn't know if it was type 1 or 2. I told him it was probably type 2, and probably resulted from a typical American lifestyle, of no exercise and a high carbohydrate diet.

I am mentioning Merko here because I think lots of Americans have similar beliefs, possibly reinforced by their MDs.

People are often told their health problems are mainly genetic and lifestyle is secondary. Well yes, someone might smoke ten packs of cigarettes a day and eat only twinkies, and stay healthy until age 90. It can happen, possibly, but it is extremely unlikely.

I really think the emphasis on genetics is very harmful. Diseases that are primarily genetic are rare, and it is misleading to tell someone with type 2 diabetes or heart disease that it's genetic.

Merko might never have another heart attack, since his blood is kept thin by drugs. However, pre-diabetes can lead to all kinds of circulation problems, and can increase the odds of getting cancer and dementia.

Do you have monomania?
It increasingly appears so.
 
Old 06-18-2018, 11:20 AM
 
18,604 posts, read 6,072,347 times
Reputation: 12596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chint View Post
Do you have monomania?
It increasingly appears so.
What does this have to do with the topic?
 
Old 06-18-2018, 11:48 AM
 
709 posts, read 165,079 times
Reputation: 1968
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
What does this have to do with the topic?
That's what monomania is - one topic, again and again, dressed up slightly different ways. Its an interesting maladay.
 
Old 06-18-2018, 11:54 AM
 
18,604 posts, read 6,072,347 times
Reputation: 12596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chint View Post
That's what monomania is - one topic, again and again, dressed up slightly different ways. Its an interesting maladay.
So some have a lot to stay and want a discussion and others don't. I have a lot to say and have many topics posted in Alt Med, is that the same for me? Stuff that doesn't interest me, I ignore. It works..

And I can add to the above by saying there are plenty here who don't start topics but are so good at questioning others. If we all stopped posting topics the group could go away, right? Then everything could go to Great Debates area.

Last edited by jaminhealth; 06-18-2018 at 12:48 PM..
 
Old 06-18-2018, 12:09 PM
 
3,202 posts, read 902,769 times
Reputation: 2561
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
When I was in high school the kid I was dating had heart problems. I know people want to feel in control, but sometimes, no matter WHAT you do, how you were born wins out.

My husband's co-worker was in great physical shape (40s), he had just passed the FBI physical fitness test, which is very hard. He died of heart attack on running laps at his regular job.

Really? A doctor didn't mention carbs in relation to diabetes? I find that incredibly hard to believe.

You keep coming up with stories where "doctors and people" believe these really weird things.

Again, I have never met a doctor who did not advise dietary changes and exercise for a wide range of medical conditions, and even if you have none.
As I said, you can always think of an example where genetics is the main factor. But MOST OF THE TIME, genetics is minor, in most typical modern cases of heart disease.
 
Old 06-18-2018, 12:10 PM
 
3,202 posts, read 902,769 times
Reputation: 2561
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
So some have a lot to stay and want a discussion and others don't. I have a lot to say and have many topics posted in Alt Med, is that the same for me? Stuff that doesn't interest me, I ignore. It works..
Some people hate to hear about this, because they don't want to see drugs criticized at all, ever.
 
Old 06-18-2018, 12:13 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
27,748 posts, read 2,169,910 times
Reputation: 9758
Merko can do as he pleases, if he wants to have an early death, then let him. We can't fix the bad habits of others.
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