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Old 07-20-2018, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
40,888 posts, read 32,658,014 times
Reputation: 57020

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffie View Post
I know plenty of doctors who prescribe antibiotics automatically for headcolds. Just to make sure nothing worse happens, like pneumonia. It's ridiculous.
You are not kidding. STOP THE MADNESS.
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Old 07-20-2018, 11:06 PM
 
2,215 posts, read 754,367 times
Reputation: 3734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffie View Post
I know plenty of doctors who prescribe antibiotics automatically for head colds. Just to make sure nothing worse happens, like pneumonia. It's ridiculous.
Yes, especially since colds are caused by a virus. AB will have no effect on it as they are only effective against bacteria. But they will kill off your good bacteria which is most of your immune system which resides mainly in your gut.

Anti - biotic = Against Life.

Be sure to take probiotics, and eat fermented foods like Kefir, Miso, Kombucha, Natto, Yogurt, Kimchi, etc to replenish your decimated good bacteria.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/rese...ne-system-meet

And the other search results for Immune system is in the gut

https://www.google.com/search?q=immu...hrome&ie=UTF-8

-------------------------------------------------
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Old 07-21-2018, 01:09 AM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
3,996 posts, read 1,776,085 times
Reputation: 13784
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Don't think it could never happen to you, either.
Now see; this is the thing. It has become so adversarial to advocate for yourself, or your child, because invariably; you are confronted by someone who has not had these adverse events. They have this false sense of security that things won't happen to them because it hasn't happened to them & in their eyes; this reflects poorly on you.

As if it's some personal moral failing on your part to have suffered an adverse reaction to a "life saving" remedy.

I am very sorry that you are experiencing such a horrible & debilitating effect from this medication, yet I am thankful that "You to whom this has happened", is someone who was not intimidated by the potential sneer or snark & was willing to start this thread & say "Heads up!" to the rest of us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
heck, google a drug while you are sitting in front of your doctor and be sure they can justify the risks associated with a prescription. They may not like that we question them but so what - it's our body, not theirs.
They'll hate it. Not that I've ever done that but I DO know of parents who have arrived at pediatrician's office with research articles that they have questions about & they have been criticized for consulting "Dr. Google".

Thing is; when/if things might go wrong? Everyone thinks: "I'd sue their *** off if that happened to me!"

Well, that's just not how that works. Sometimes when "that happens", you are in considerable pain &
just getting a shower & putting your makeup on becomes the daily "today's goal". Maybe you've got the dreaded "brain fog" & it takes you an hour to jot down a grocery list.

If your condition isn't seriously or permanently mitigating, you won't have a case & if it is you may not have the ability to pursue it anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I am a big believer in the miracles of modern medicine. But that doesn't mean I will ever just take a medication because a doctor prescribes it.
For sure; these are amazing times & I'd be the first to admit that I have been "saved" by capabilities that did not exist 100 years ago. However, what saved me; might harm you. What gave you a second shot at life; could end mine. This is the part of modern medicine that remains uncharted territory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Like you, the more I look around, the more people I know who are adversely affected by these drugs.
For me, that new perspective led to an eerie "connect the dots" type of experience where I started to wonder about the scope of who had been impacted by what & how ... Then; why? Obviously, there is the profit motive.

That accounts for most. Not all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ihatetodust View Post
I have taken these a couple of times no issues. They don't affect everyone badly.
Me too & of course they don't. Cipro is one of the few antibiotics I will request by name because the weaker broad-spectrum antibiotics are ineffective for me.

Ironically; I have a genetic variant that causes me to react atypically to 25% of all current pharmaceuticals but Cipro ... is not one of them!

However, as I am very used to being that one in a million case of some bizarre & rare adverse event, you won't hear me telling somebody: "No it doesn't, no, you didn't, that was coincidental, etc ..."

Good luck to you, KA. I wish you a speedy recovery with no lasting impairments!
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Old 07-21-2018, 04:20 AM
 
275 posts, read 37,917 times
Reputation: 381
Geeze, great. I remember Cipro being prescribed by my childrens’ pediatrician constantly in the late 80’s & early 90’s for their constant ear infections and URIs, which are pretty much endless in daycare.
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Old 07-21-2018, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
1,699 posts, read 1,639,280 times
Reputation: 1346
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
Blame the medical practitioners who ignored the black box warning. Cipro et al. have carried a black box warning since 2008. Even though patients are now alleging additional serious side effects, the initial black box warning should have been adequate to warn practitioners that the drug should only be prescribed when a less risky antibiotic is available.



I guess this is a good reminder that patients might want to take a peek at the drug's insert, as well.
Yes! I was PA until about 1997 and I remember the warnings then. I very rarely prescribed it, and if I remember correctly, when I did the does was one pill, not a week's worth.
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Old 07-21-2018, 06:27 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,101 posts, read 3,923,269 times
Reputation: 18770
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
A couple of years ago the doctor recommended some sort of prescription drug for my husband. I googled it while we were sitting there in her office and immediately noticed that it clearly stated not to take it with some other drug, which he was taking. I said, "Wait - is this a good idea considering he's taking such and such?" The doctor looked at me in an irritated manner, looked back at her computer, read some stuff and then said, "Tell you what - I'm going to change this to (some other drug which DIDN'T have any negative interaction with what he was currently taking)." She didn't like that I questioned her but what if I hadn't?

Now if you have a smart phone you can immediately look up whatever the doc wants you to take and decide then and there if it's something you want to put in your body.
Exactly - I had a doctor prescribe something for my fibromyalgia pain once despite the fact that he knew I had an ulcer. I even asked him if it was okay to take this with my ulcer (google wasn't around yet). He said it was fine. When I got home and read the insert it said to NOT take it if you have a history of ulcers. So I called the doctor's office and he acted like "of course you shouldn't take this medication if you have ulcers.")

Another doctor tried to prescribe Cipro because of a supposed UTI. I had no symptoms of a UTI but was told there was bacteria in my urine. I've had one UTI in my entire 63 years. I think the issue was I didn't do a "clean catch". Needless to say I refused the Cipro. We really have to be our own health advocates as doctors are too dependent on pharmaceuticals some times and they rarely have good knowledge when it comes to nutrition, supplements or natural alternatives.
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Old 07-21-2018, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
40,888 posts, read 32,658,014 times
Reputation: 57020
Quote:
Originally Posted by happygrrrl View Post
Geeze, great. I remember Cipro being prescribed by my childrensí pediatrician constantly in the late 80ís & early 90ís for their constant ear infections and URIs, which are pretty much endless in daycare.
Right - for awhile, it was really the sexy wonderdrug of choice.

If your kids weren't affected by it then, they are probably fine, but I would caution them about continuing to take it.
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Old 07-21-2018, 11:57 AM
 
2,215 posts, read 754,367 times
Reputation: 3734
I think I remember that Cipro was used back with the Anthrax scare. When anthrax was being sent through the mail, and other terrorist fears. That was the first I had heard of it. Here is an article from the internet "time machine".

https://www.nytimes.com/2001/10/16/b...nd-output.html

My personal cipro story, the short version . About 8-10 yrs ago after my appendix ruptured they found a "bag" of gram negative toxic soup growing on my ruptured appendix. They inserted a tube into my belly to drain it out over several weeks. In my first hospital stay I had intravenous broad spectrum antibiotics for several days till they could grow out a culture. Then two more specific kinds of A/B. I don't remember what they were. They kept blowing out my veins, and blaming me for it .

But several weeks later after it was starting to get better the pain started coming back. They took a sample, and found out that MRSA, the flesh eating bacteria, was starting to grow in the appendix . That's when they prescribed Cipro in addition to the 2 other kinds. I was so very sick. They were surprised I didn't get sepsis. Two stays, nine days total in the hospital with no insurance. The bill came to $82,000.

The last time in there I was isolated, and anyone coming into my room had to put on disposable garments, and shoe covers then throw them away after leaving. That was because of the mrsa. It was a total nightmare! But I'm still alive, sort of . So that is my Cipro story . That is why I posted about beneficial bacteria because A/B decimate them. Also, bad bacteria love iron, they feed on it. And I had very high storage iron levels (hemochromatosis, or iron overload). It's genetic, and common for Celtic/northern european people. We load iron about 4x normal. I give blood to bring down the iron levels. So Cipro helped save my life, but I don't know if it did any other damage on the side.

My best regards to all of you with issues you are fighting.
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Old 07-21-2018, 11:58 AM
 
1,333 posts, read 635,498 times
Reputation: 5724
Scary stuff. I was put on Cipro a few years ago for severe bronchitis, borderline pneumonia. After taking it for 5 days I came down with a mild case of non-infectious meningitis. Was taken off cipro immediately and switched to another antibio and steroids. It was very uncomfortable, severe stiff neck, headache, fever, feeling very ill. Thankfully the symptoms resolved within a week. But I would never take cipro or others of its class again, unless there was absolutely no other choice.
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Old 07-21-2018, 01:51 PM
 
7,649 posts, read 5,404,882 times
Reputation: 14357
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
K.A. You didn't need it but took it as a Precaution to What? This is pretty shocking and thank goodness I've escaped this class of abx drugs. jam
Every single thing that you put into your mouth has side effects.

This happens to be a serious (Black Warning) side effect, but tendon damage was higher percentage.

Any human can react to any medication (including the premature infants who became blind because of high concentration of OXYGEN 50 years ago) in any way.

It becomes a risk vs reward issue.

The discontinuing of Levaquin (one of the antibiotics of last resort left to treat antibiotic resistant organisms) may be a good, or a VERY Bad decision that will cost lives in the future.

This is my only post in this thread. I will not be drawn into a dark hole arguing with you (jamin) ever again
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