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Old 07-21-2018, 08:13 PM
 
8,504 posts, read 2,387,119 times
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Lisonopril here - it can take a couple days or a week to really settle in and work.....

Trivia - Lisonopril is patterned after snake venom (chemically). It wasn't much of a stretch for scientists to note that certain snakes killed or injured by their venom lowering BP.....

"In 1968, studies carried out in the Royal College of Surgeons laboratories of Nobel prize winner, John Vane, showed that peptides from the Brazilian viperís venom inhibited the activity of ACE from dog lung.

When Vane proposed an ACE inhibitor research programme to US pharmaceutical company, ER Squibb and Sons (now part of Bristol Myers Squibb)...it was decided that there was enough clinical interest to proceed with trying to develop synthetic ACE inhibitors that were orally active."
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Old 07-21-2018, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,477 posts, read 2,532,722 times
Reputation: 4197
Avoid the meds:

1. Start a walking program.

2. Become a vegan so that none of the bad food screws with you.

3. Give up gluten.

4. Take 500 mg of Taurine and arginine 4 times a day.

5. Add dark choclate powder to your diet in almond milk 2-3 times a day.

6. Get a Juicer. Drink a 1/4 cup of fresh beet juice 4 times a day.

7. Lose weight.
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Old 07-21-2018, 09:27 PM
 
6,121 posts, read 3,316,354 times
Reputation: 13007
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
According to Louise Hay, high blood pressure is a result of long term emotional problems that have not been resolved.

HeartMath (in Boulder Creek, CA) does research that you might be interested in.
Louise Hay is dead; before she died she had zero medical training. I will take healthcare advice from those with an understanding of science and medicine, thank you.
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Old 07-21-2018, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Kansas City North
3,625 posts, read 6,756,846 times
Reputation: 4630
I’ve been taking HCTZ and Atenolol for about 40 years and it works like a charm and no side effects. Tried an ACE inhibitor and got the dreaded “kennel cough.”

Both parents and both my siblings have High blood pressure.

For years I studiously avoided adding salt to food and really watched the processed food. However, a couple years ago I decided to start adding a little salt to sliced tomatoes, potatoes and eggs. Since I’ve now outlived by mother by 10 years and nearly have my dad beat I think I deserve it.
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Old 07-21-2018, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,481 posts, read 26,078,274 times
Reputation: 26426
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
So you post a quote, and assume it is the absolute undeniable truth.

A healthy lifestyle, most of the time, DOES treat the cause. The cause is insulin resistance, which is caused by the modern lifestyle.

Everyone knows this, except people who want to sell drugs.

And salt sensitivity is probably a result of metabolic syndrome. So correct the metabolic syndrome and you don't have to worry about salt.

And by the way, you never say anything about your own lifestyle. Your mother and grandmother had strokes, but you don't say anything about their lifestyles. If a thin and physically active person has a stroke at a relatively young age, then it probably wasn't lifestyle-related. But you never give the critical information.
A quote from authors affiliated with a medical school (from an article with 61 references.)

Nah, it could not possibly be the "truth", could it?

A healthy lifestyle is part of the treatment of hypertension, but you cannot say it "treats the cause" because no one knows what the cause is. It is not as simple as "insulin resistance" because people who do not have insulin resistance can have hypertension and people with insulin resistance may not have hypertension.

No, "everyone" does not "know this," since it seems you are making it up on the fly. Do you have any sources at all to back up what you are saying in this thread?

Salt sensitivity is genetic, not "probably a result of metabolic syndrome." Made that up, didn't you?

Here are a couple of articles about the genetics. They do not include all the genes involved.

http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content.../1204.full.pdf

http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content.../1359.full.pdf

There is no treatment that will "correct the metabolic syndrome" per se. Each component of the syndrome has to be addressed. That means treating hypertension if an individual has hypertension as a feature of his metabolic syndrome.

At the time my hypertension was diagnosed I weighed 135 pounds and was walking 4 miles per day five or more days per week, outside or on a treadmill. I actually wore my first treadmill out. Got a commercial one after that, which I still have. I walked every opportunity that I could. I parked far from the doors to stores. I walked at the mall. I walked at the local track. I even walked in airports. Still had the high blood pressure, controlled on medication.

I now do not walk as much now and weigh a bit more but I have a large yard (about 9 acres) to take care of and do my own housework, at 70 years old.

My mother and grandmother had hypertension. I do not know about my great grandmother; she died before I was born. I do know she was paralyzed by a stroke and bedridden for some time before she died. All three also had atherosclerosis. All three were housewives. My grandmother reared four children after my grandfather had a fatal heart attack at age 43. He was chasing a cow (he ran a dairy) when it happened. He was a small, thin man. Neither my mother nor my grandmother was obese. I do not know about my great grandmother. The only photo I have of her at about age 45 is of her seated and it is hard to tell. Not massively obese, though "matronly".

If someone has hypertension the clock is running on its complications. It needs to be treated while lifestyle changes are implemented, because the risks are just too great to wait.
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Old 07-21-2018, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,061 posts, read 9,305,978 times
Reputation: 13128
I take losartan and hctz. No noticable side effects. I mostly stay in the 120/80 range but it does fluctuate. May have to double the dose of the hctz, we'll see. I wanted something that didn't have a bunch of pesky side effects.
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Old 07-21-2018, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,061 posts, read 9,305,978 times
Reputation: 13128
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
A quote from authors affiliated with a medical school (from an article with 61 references.)

Nah, it could not possibly be the "truth", could it?

A healthy lifestyle is part of the treatment of hypertension, but you cannot say it "treats the cause" because no one knows what the cause is. It is not as simple as "insulin resistance" because people who do not have insulin resistance can have hypertension and people with insulin resistance may not have hypertension.

No, "everyone" does not "know this," since it seems you are making it up on the fly. Do you have any sources at all to back up what you are saying in this thread?

Salt sensitivity is genetic, not "probably a result of metabolic syndrome." Made that up, didn't you?

Here are a couple of articles about the genetics. They do not include all the genes involved.

http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content.../1204.full.pdf

http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content.../1359.full.pdf

There is no treatment that will "correct the metabolic syndrome" per se. Each component of the syndrome has to be addressed. That means treating hypertension if an individual has hypertension as a feature of his metabolic syndrome.

At the time my hypertension was diagnosed I weighed 135 pounds and was walking 4 miles per day five or more days per week, outside or on a treadmill. I actually wore my first treadmill out. Got a commercial one after that, which I still have. I walked every opportunity that I could. I parked far from the doors to stores. I walked at the mall. I walked at the local track. I even walked in airports. Still had the high blood pressure, controlled on medication.

I now do not walk as much now and weigh a bit more but I have a large yard (about 9 acres) to take care of and do my own housework, at 70 years old.

My mother and grandmother had hypertension. I do not know about my great grandmother; she died before I was born. I do know she was paralyzed by a stroke and bedridden for some time before she died. All three also had atherosclerosis. All three were housewives. My grandmother reared four children after my grandfather had a fatal heart attack at age 43. He was chasing a cow (he ran a dairy) when it happened. He was a small, thin man. Neither my mother nor my grandmother was obese. I do not know about my great grandmother. The only photo I have of her at about age 45 is of her seated and it is hard to tell. Not massively obese, though "matronly".

If someone has hypertension the clock is running on its complications. It needs to be treated while lifestyle changes are implemented, because the risks are just too great to wait.
I agree. I was basically a stroke waiting to happen, and still am, if I don't take my meds. I am lean and I work out regularly. Didn't really do squat in the HBP department I'm sorry to say. Thanks to my meds I can live my life, and coupled with diet and exercise, I feel better knowing that my condition is managed. People don't realize how serious chronic HBP is until it is too late. I remember the day I broke down and decided to start getting on the medication - my numbers were constantly over 160/110. I couldn't even get my root canal taken care of due to the pressure issue.
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Old 07-21-2018, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,481 posts, read 26,078,274 times
Reputation: 26426
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
And yet, the medical profession stubbornly continues to recommend low salt for everyone.
Synopsis of the 2017 ACC/AHA Hypertension Guideline | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians

"Nonpharmacologic Interventions
Lifestyle changes alone are recommended for most adults newly classified as having stage 1 hypertension (130 to 139/80 to 89 mm Hg), and lifestyle changes plus drug therapy are recommended for those with existing CVD or increased CVD risk."

http://annals.org/data/Journals/AIM/..._BP_Goals.jpeg

An essay on salt:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4684107/

"This, in my view, leads to the first key point: It is theoretically possible to consume too little sodium, but whether the relevant cut-point is set high or low, the vast majority of adults living in the real world consume too much."

"If instead we embrace what we reliably know about healthful eating in general, sodium intake will tend to fall in the sweet spot, along with the intake of all other nutrients. In other words, we could reliably defend ourselves against hyperbole and headlines, malnutrition and misinformation alikeówith wholesome foods, in sensible combinations."
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Old 07-22-2018, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,061 posts, read 9,305,978 times
Reputation: 13128
I want to reiterate .... I have a body fat of 22.6%, I workout 6 hrs/wk. I watch what I eat. I donít have any ďmetabolic syndromeĒ my other health markers are great.

My blood pressure would still be to the sky if I wasnít on the medication. And letís be clear here...there is no tapering off regardless of my lifestyle. Itís lower dose, yes, but I truly doubt that I will ever be one of those lucky 1% who will get off the mess and manage hbp on diet and exercise alone. And judging by some of the posters here Iím not alone.

Before you think that you can turn it around by diet or whatever consult your doctor. Understand that diet, while helpful, may not always work and like diabetes you need treatment ASAP. HBp can interferes with your life -silently- and not all pressure meds have terrible side effects. I donít really have any plus Iíve safely consumed alcohol on occasion as well. Too much ch risk to not do anything
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Old 07-22-2018, 06:41 AM
 
756 posts, read 364,177 times
Reputation: 2036
Quote:
Originally Posted by slyfox2 View Post
Avoid the meds:

1. Start a walking program.

2. Become a vegan so that none of the bad food screws with you.

3. Give up gluten.

4. Take 500 mg of Taurine and arginine 4 times a day.

5. Add dark choclate powder to your diet in almond milk 2-3 times a day.

6. Get a Juicer. Drink a 1/4 cup of fresh beet juice 4 times a day.

7. Lose weight.
Thanks for the free medical advice, that every Tom Dick and Harry has. Tried so many things. One was celery., ate it, until it came out of my ears, drank more teas from the herb store, that they swore by. Spent most of my time peeing. In the meantime my BP was on the rise, and yes I was walking, now I have heel pain Now I pop my pill once a day, and BP is perfect
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