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Old 07-21-2018, 04:58 PM
 
18,807 posts, read 6,149,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
IIRC, most MD appointments--on average--encompass 8 minutes, or less. That can be sufficient... or not.
Before I visit any of my MDs, I jot-down a few questions, and my asking of those questions--and the receipt of their responses--can lengthen my time with that doctor, as well as add to my knowledge base.
8 minutes and they bill medicare or whatever insurance one has about $300 give or take. And if one is going to a new doctor, the appt should be longer as two new people meeting each other and that billing can be $600 to medicare.
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Old 07-21-2018, 05:05 PM
 
1,470 posts, read 1,387,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
IIRC, most MD appointments--on average--encompass 8 minutes, or less. That can be sufficient... or not.
Before I visit any of my MDs, I jot-down a few questions, and my asking of those questions--and the receipt of their responses--can lengthen my time with that doctor, as well as add to my knowledge base.
Medical students are trained to complete a history and physical exam in 10 minutes.
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Old 07-21-2018, 05:09 PM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
2,484 posts, read 1,710,061 times
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insurance companies don't pay drs to chit chat, they often pay by diagnoses.

so when the dr goes through the blood tests and calls you back, that's usually on their dime. When the old person want to talk about their kids because they haven't spoken to another person in a few weeks, that's on their dime too.
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Old 07-21-2018, 05:19 PM
 
1,470 posts, read 1,387,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
8 minutes and they bill medicare or whatever insurance one has about $300 give or take. And if one is going to a new doctor, the appt should be longer as two new people meeting each other and that billing can be $600 to medicare.
Generally speaking, new patients are allotted much more time then a returning patient.

Billing isnít for time, itís diagnosis and treatment as stated above. That bill may be $600 but look at what Medicare actually pays.
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Old 07-21-2018, 05:25 PM
 
3,032 posts, read 1,211,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Oh yes, they spend more time on the puter than with patients. That is the medical trend today.

Much of the old time medicine and doctors I do miss.
More time on the computer is actually better. The notes can be more detailed and helpful from appointment to appointment. Some of the handwritten notes are just awful (I read them in my job). You might have a 50-minute appointment, but then with the handwritten/dictated notes there is like one or two sentences and no information about what happened in that visit. That makes it a lot worse when the person goes to a referral or moves to a new place and needs a detailed medical history.
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Old 07-21-2018, 05:32 PM
 
18,807 posts, read 6,149,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charmed hour View Post
Generally speaking, new patients are allotted much more time then a returning patient.

Billing isnít for time, itís diagnosis and treatment as stated above. That bill may be $600 but look at what Medicare actually pays.
Whatever it's for...I went to a ortho MD after my hip replacement "mess" in 2010 and was shocked to see that she billed medicare $600 for that appt. Wonder why I try to avoid going to doctors...I know why.

How they bill, they try for the most they can get from insurance.
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Old 07-21-2018, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Hawaii/Alabama
1,595 posts, read 2,969,104 times
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I am not enthralled with my Doctors; I am grateful that they are competent, compassionate and kind. Their computers make things faster and allows them to check for possible interactions with my meds and treatments.

I live just outside of large cities (2 different States) and see both Military and civilian Doctors. I do have to wait, sometimes for a long time, but I am used to "hurry up and wait " as we were an Army family.

It is a good thing that we all have the ability to choose the Doctors that we have an affinity for and that can satisfy our needs.
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Old 07-21-2018, 06:03 PM
 
2,684 posts, read 963,998 times
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Maybe 15 years ago, I went to an eye dr and he went in the attached bathroom and washed his hands and I thought OMG, I haven't seen THAT since childhood. He explained the entire procedure I needed and showed me a cataract lens implant and tried to schedule me quickly because I was a nervous wreck and spent an hour with me and I recommended him to everyone who ever asked me for an eye dr.

2 years ago, I ended up having gall bladder surgery and talked to the back of a surgeon on the computer, had all my tests done by nurses or PAs, and when I asked him to explain the procedure, the resident snapped Look it up on the internet! and he nodded his agreement. Not worth 2 cents.

And I understand the political background of medicine these days, can fit all my questions into 15 mins, and don't want to talk about my kids to some stranger. I know the difference between a rushed doctor trying to do his best and a pr*ck.
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Old 07-21-2018, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
7,098 posts, read 2,213,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
Family doc and specialists I'd say about five minutes. The human touch in medicine is rapidly vanishing. Being really old I remember as a kid in the 50's what old school medicine was all about. We lived in rural Ohio and doctors made house calls carrying the old black leather medical bags. Different times.
I've noticed this and I like it. The only reason I submit to periodic office visits, is to keep my medical coverage active. The less time I spend there, the better. A doctor's office/clinic/hospital is the most likely place you will contract a disease.
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Old 07-21-2018, 06:23 PM
 
Location: South Florida
56 posts, read 18,709 times
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Doctors who treat Medicare patients are required to keep their patients' notes on a computer. Their reimbursement by Medicare is reduced when doctors do not do this. (I learned this from my [now retired] internist.)


Some doctors prefer to have their PAs record the patient's meds., reason for visit, B.P., T.P.R., height, weight, etc. They come into the examining room, scan the notes, ask a few questions, and examine the patient. The rest of the time, s/he has his/her back to the patient and is putting diagnosis codes into the computer. Yes, it feels sterile, but overall, is the patient receiving the proper diagnosis and treatment?



Other doctors have an MA with them throughout the visit and the MA is taking notes on the computer tablet. This doesn't exactly engender the feelings of patient privacy and patient/doctor relationships. But, with insurance companies and large managed medical practice groups dictating what we need--and not our doctors, this is what we get today.


For those who have the money and the desire, there is also 'concierge' doctor service. For a fee of a few-to-several thousands of dollars per year, one has the privilege of being a finite number of patients a doctor will see. This, of course, is in addition to all the other fees incurred by office visits, labs, etc.


Those of us who remember lengthy office visits (where the doctor really knew you and your family) and made after-hours house calls, are fondly remembering the good old days. Those were times when, most often, doctors relied upon their own abilities to diagnose and didn't need testing, x-rays, and modern scanning equipment to treat their patients. Patients weren't litigious and doctors weren't ordering tests to CYA.



Those days are gone for most of us. The upside is that this modern testing helps to diagnose us and save our lives far better than in the 'good old days'. There's usually a price to be paid; beyond dollars, the price is the loss of time and relationships with our medical providers.


The best way to make the most time of what your doctor can give you at your office visit is to:
bring to the office a written list of all your meds (include their dosages and frequency of use) and over-the-counter supplements
write your questions and bring them with you to your doctor visit, leaving room for you to write the answer below each question
keep your questions pertinent to the reason for your visit
if you're unsure you understand, ask the doctor to repeat the answer/diagnosis/treatment plan to you
if tests have been done, request a copy of the results to put into your own medical file at home


Doctors' medical schooling can leave them in debt amounting to several hundred thousands of dollars. You are paying them for what they have learned, not their time. Their expertise took years and money to acquire. They pay outrageous amounts to have medical malpractice insurance, run an office, pay back debts for schooling, setting up an office, buying medical equipment, etc. Once we keep that in mind, it's far easier to see a medical practice from the doctor's point of view.


And no, I am not in the medical field, nor are any of my relatives. I just try to see different sides of issues.
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