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Old 08-05-2018, 09:54 PM
 
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Someone had posted a link on the constipation and dementia link, I can't find it.
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Old 08-18-2018, 02:30 PM
 
1,685 posts, read 1,670,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
Ask him what he had for dinner last night. If he can tell you he's probably doesn't have Alzheimers or Dementia. Dementia and Alzheimers attack short term memory first. He should have a full blood test (CBC and differential including iron and ferritin) right away. Some metabolic problems can negatively effect the brain. Something as simple as low sodium can have massive consequences if it progresses. Low Hgb can cause a person to feel mentally out of it. While some conditions like dementia might not be treatable, any other conditions that can effect mental functioning are, and many are time sensitive to prevent major problems from occurrring.
Actually, first signs of bvFTD are usually mood changes, poor decisions, and/or disinhibited behavior. Short term memory is not an early sign of it.

I think you are doing him a disservice by leaving "the ball in his court." If he is in the early stages of a disease such as bvFTD that robs a person of his executive function, he may not be able to initiate enough to make an appointment--simply deciding what to do next can be monumental.
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Old 08-18-2018, 04:18 PM
 
975 posts, read 855,937 times
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Originally Posted by AtlJan View Post
Actually, first signs of bvFTD are usually mood changes, poor decisions, and/or disinhibited behavior. Short term memory is not an early sign of it.

I think you are doing him a disservice by leaving "the ball in his court." If he is in the early stages of a disease such as bvFTD that robs a person of his executive function, he may not be able to initiate enough to make an appointment--simply deciding what to do next can be monumental.
This^^^^^^. A thousand times this^^^^^^. I've lived with someone with FTD and it is NOT Alzheimer's. I've already posted enough about it but wanted to emphasize the importance of pursuing a diagnosis ASAP. Some of the behaviors can present a hazard not only to the person with it but to others who might be innocent victims of the FTD person's poor/lack of judgment.
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Old 08-18-2018, 10:05 PM
 
1,685 posts, read 1,670,612 times
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Originally Posted by movinon View Post
This^^^^^^. A thousand times this^^^^^^. I've lived with someone with FTD and it is NOT Alzheimer's. I've already posted enough about it but wanted to emphasize the importance of pursuing a diagnosis ASAP. Some of the behaviors can present a hazard not only to the person with it but to others who might be innocent victims of the FTD person's poor/lack of judgment.
Yes. The next thing you know, the person with this illness becomes physically violent or makes a huge financial mistake. Don't wait.
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Old 08-20-2018, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Also, some types of dementia do well with intervention via a drug like Aricept, for a couple of years. It does seem to hold off (not cure) the progression for a couple of years.
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Old 08-21-2018, 10:25 AM
 
1,326 posts, read 530,027 times
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Originally Posted by Jill_Schramm View Post
Thanks so much for all the suggestions.

My current plan is to push him to see a doctor if and when these issues crop up again. As I mentioned upthread, he seemed very happy, relaxed and normal this evening. I suggested seeing a doctor given his state yesterday, but he said he is no longer concerned. His only screw-up today is that he forgot to shave before he left this morning, but I think that’s pretty minor.

We’ll see.
For a man who shaves every morning, no, that is not minor. Please encourage him to see his doctor.
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Old 08-21-2018, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
4,919 posts, read 4,222,734 times
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This is going to sound weird, but a very common cause of cognitive issues in older people that seem to come on suddenly is a urinary tract infection. UTI's are very quickly and easily cured with antibiotics. Without treatment, they can linger and eventually end up resulting in bladder and kidney problems.

Just talk to him and tell him you are worried about his health and that it would make YOU more at peace if he would see the doctor. Go with him and explain to the doctor the changes you have talked about here. I know you can't MAKE him go, but waiting for another incident may just be allowing the problem to get worse, when it may be something that can be treated, or even cured. Or it could be that the next incident is the big one that changes both of your lives in a very bad way.
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Old 08-29-2018, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Northeast US
88 posts, read 48,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlJan View Post
Actually, first signs of bvFTD are usually mood changes, poor decisions, and/or disinhibited behavior. Short term memory is not an early sign of it.

I think you are doing him a disservice by leaving "the ball in his court." If he is in the early stages of a disease such as bvFTD that robs a person of his executive function, he may not be able to initiate enough to make an appointment--simply deciding what to do next can be monumental.

AtlJan is right about that! It's unbelievable how difficult life can be when executive functions are impaired. On a good day with good luck, I think I come close to passing/ "looking normal" (that's assuming I was doing well enough on a day to get out in the world and be looked at, in the first place) but since my ex-brain tumor+friends, my executive functioning is seriously damaged, and even I have trouble believing how hard it is for me to do the very simplest actions. Things that most people don't even have to think about - things that most people could accomplish on auto-pilot 90% of the time. It's been a big decrease in these abilities, if I wasn't seeing it myself, I wouldn't believe it - actually even though I am going through it every day, it's truly astounding. You name whatever dumb little chore, it's a challenge for me. I can still dance (under the right circumstances) but sometimes I can't figure out how to get dressed to go out, and how to get to & from where the dancing will happen.

As I said in way too many words upthread, who even knows if my own condition is treatable/ curable? I've never had anyone in the position to guide my medical care, and I'm seemingly unable to arrange for it myself (btw that's one of those things like I was saying, that's just hard for me to believe is difficult, after having luckily been able to handle such things for many years, both for myself & family, without much trouble).

The OP's spouse however, has the good fortune to be in a relationship with a trustworthy, caring partner who has the competence to recognize when their spouse isn't able to see the seriousness of their own condition (& knowing that an inability to understand one's own health and seek appropriate medical care is a known feature of some of the potential conditions). Since the person being affected can't connect with the need, or can't manage the required actions to get, medical evaluation and maybe treatment -- this is when the loving partner should gently (if possible) guide them to the appropriate medical practitioners by whatever means they need to use (I'd use bribery/ light manipulation before trickery before force, but I'm not good with relationships, so ya'll should probably do the way that works best for you) however, just make it your task to keep going with/ taking him to the doctors & acting as his ally, making sure the doctors are aware of his problems, keep them testing him until they figure out the reason for his issues. Or at least until the deadly &/or treatable potential causes have been ruled-out.


tl;dr: Using the path of least resistance, get him to doctor/s & associated appointments until they figure out the problem; it seems possible that he can't (for whatever reason) do that himself. With or without the doctor he could still be fine in a few days, or could die, or start to lose his faculties slowly, maybe begin a long dwindle down & up a gnarly spiral road until it leads to death, or maybe the doctors can't figure out what's wrong but can treat some of the symptoms if needed... or they do figure it out & find the right treatment that works & makes a difference. ..... You know him best, though, and what your relationship will allow. I'd want my spouse to do that for me, if I had one, and if he were able to do it.
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