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Old 08-10-2018, 06:40 PM
 
18,807 posts, read 6,149,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newtovenice View Post
Make sure you arrange with your doctor or hospital that painkillers/pain management WILL be available to take with you from the hospital.

A coworker had a TKA and because of the *opioid crisis* was not able to get her prescription filled. By ANY pharmacy she called. There is a 5-day waiting period in her state. She had to deal with the pain no painkillers after she left the hospital.
Why wouldn't the hospital discharge her with some type of pain meds...the pain is HIGH with this replacement surgeries. People don't realize until they'e done a replacement. Even a schedule for ibuprofen of say 800mg for a while to get her thru the worst.
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:38 AM
 
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Physical therapist taught my mother a series of exercises she did for the month or so before surgery. She explained the this would strengthen the muscles in preparation for the replacement and it seemed like these were the exact ones she did afterwards as well.

Not sure if these were the exact exercises, but close.

https://www.healthline.com/health/to...es#bottom-line
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:41 AM
 
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We also used a Plastic Tub Transfer Bench with Adjustable Backrest.

It was a sliding bench so she sat down out of the tub, swung her good leg in and was able to use an extra long shower hose to wash up.
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:43 AM
 
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Also, eating healthy food is essential as your body heals.

Freezing healthy entrees and making arrangements for veggies and fruit to be delivered will be a boon.
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Old 08-11-2018, 06:30 AM
 
4,784 posts, read 1,545,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Why wouldn't the hospital discharge her with some type of pain meds...the pain is HIGH with this replacement surgeries. People don't realize until they'e done a replacement. Even a schedule for ibuprofen of say 800mg for a while to get her thru the worst.
Ibu doesn't cut it with this surgery.

They gave her a prescription for an opioid and she could not fill it anywhere. Pharmacies said no. That's my point.

OP: make sure you fully understand the pain management available to you for when you are home BEFORE you are discharged form the hospital.
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Old 08-11-2018, 07:31 AM
 
496 posts, read 221,186 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
spare bending your knee
The ability to bend the knee is crucial for a lot of activities: climbing stairs, stepping over the rim of the bathtub, putting your pants on... Most of you are seated while reading C-D. Try this: stick one leg out, but keep your foot on the floor. Now try to stand up without using your arms. You'd find it very difficult.

When working with my patients, I aim for at least 90 deg of bending (flexion, in medical terms) by about 2-3 weeks after surgery. Over the next few weeks they should get to at least 110-120 deg, which is sufficient to be functional.

By the same token, the ability to straighten out your leg (extension, in medical terms) is also very important. If you cannot extend your leg, the surgical side will be effectively shorter than the other leg, when you stand up. Two legs of unequal length = limping. This will negatively impact your knee and hip joints over the long run.

True story: I am working right now with a patient who had a knee replacement in 2003. For some reason, she did not have proper physical therapy afterwards, and now she cannot bend that leg more than 70 deg. She has a heck of a time getting up from a chair, climbing stairs, etc... Lots of things we take for granted or do without even a second thought, are very difficult for her.
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Old 08-11-2018, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,289 posts, read 79,469,982 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraZetterberg153 View Post
I may need to do either a joint replacement or a complete knee replacement on my left knee, due to damage I sustained from a riding accident. I'm thinking, based on what I've read so far:

• Buy a freezer, so lots of ice will be available
• Get into the best shape, physically, I can, including being both very slender and as strong as I can be
• I have my dad's canes I could use, but no walker
• Recovery could be anywhere from six weeks to several months, assuming no complications?
• I'm concerned about showering if I only have the use of one leg?
• The walk from the parking area behind the house to my front door is a flat surface, and I could lean on the house

Please share your experiences and book recommendations. I'm hoping I won't need this. I just turned 68.
Haven't read all the comments so am probably repeating what has been said but here goes:

1-freezer, only if you do not have freezer space in the fridge; yes, you will use a lot of ice, but not that much You will probably have an ice holder machine which will need to be filled periodically but you won't use it 24/7 by any means

It goes without saying, it is best to be in good physical condition possible but I don't think you need to be a slim as possible within reason. You are making a bit too much out of this I think, especially when you are not even sure what type of surgery you are talking about.

You will need to borrow a walker or rent one. Yes, for about a month you may be using it at least when you are out and about.

Recovery can take as long as a year if you are talking full recovery with the ability to completely bend your knee but your basic recovery shouldn't take more than a few months.. I think it was 6 weeks or 8 weeks after surgery I finished PT.

As for walking from car to house, this is where the walker will be needed for awhile. You will be driving in just a few weeks unless you choose to stay on pain pills after that. Of course you do not want to drive if you are still on pain meds. I was off pain meds a few weeks after surgery except for the days I did PT> and then just one. I also was off the walker about the same time, maybe a week later When I did grocery shopping I used a store electric cart a couple of times.

Taking a shower isn't all that difficult as long as you are not talking shower over tub only. I did ave hubby stay in the bathroom with me the first couple of times I showered but after that no problems.

It is good you are preparing but as I said, I think you are worrying unduly. Most of my comments are based on not just my experience but that of friends and we are all, probably much older than you.
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Old 08-11-2018, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,289 posts, read 79,469,982 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Get prepared for what could be a long rehab...and I agree good to read some recovery stories. These replacements are NOT a walk in the park. I"m doing all I can to keep going with my damaged knee as the fear for surgery is just too much. I've read enough recovery groups and stories, people don't realize the magnitude of these replacement surgeries until they go thru them...I never did when I did the hip replacement...and I live with enough regrets.

Also, depending on your outcome, rehab at a facility may be needed. Hard to know until all is done. If you come home from surgery, so good to have someone to help you. Then you have to have in home PT.

But good luck to you whatever you decide.

A friend did one at 86 and she's 91 and hers turned out OK for her.

On the bathing, learn to do a lot of sponge baths and get a good supply of wipes. I've had to change so much in my life. Fear of falling is forever present.
I am thinking from the ops comments they are relatively young, so most likely they will not go to a recovery center after the surgery but you are right, regardless of the age, having someone with you for the first few days to a week is almost a must. If not, then, yes, rehab center might be the answer. But more and more insurances are not covering rehab centers unless their is a medical reason. Heck when our daughter in her 50s had back surgery and her husband was working out of town the insurance still insisted she only spend 2 days in the hospital and no rehab center. Our younger daughter, from Fl came and took care of her or a few days til hubby got back.

You are right we all go through the fear of falling.
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Old 08-11-2018, 09:59 AM
 
1,653 posts, read 550,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
It is good you are preparing but as I said, I think you are worrying unduly. Most of my comments are based on not just my experience but that of friends and we are all, probably much older than you.
No, guys: not young. Just turned 68 a couple of weeks ago.

Last edited by KaraZetterberg153; 08-11-2018 at 10:30 AM..
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Old 08-11-2018, 10:18 AM
 
18,807 posts, read 6,149,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nccoast View Post
Actually, a rollator can be risky for some folks as it rolls too easily. I would advise everyone to use a plain rolling walker first, when coming out of knee-replacement surgery.

OP - The hospital will certainly supply you with a rolling walker. If you need a cane, check out thrift shops: in my area, canes go for $5 or less, rolling walkers for $7-$8, and rollators for $10-$20.
There's probably a lot of truth to that, a plain ole walker for the early stages. Those rollators can take off from what I've observed.
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