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Old 09-25-2018, 06:20 PM
 
14,930 posts, read 19,196,424 times
Reputation: 20794

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
...I had a fear of a Burgess Meredith / Twilight Zone scenario.

I understand.

I was wearing ultra-thick bifocals in high school. My all-girls school was downtown so I rode the city bus to and from my suburban area. I often stayed very late at school because of many after-school activities and walked to the bus stop late at night. (When I look back now at how I walked 10 blocks down Texas Avenue in downtown Houston, past sleazy bars and the bus station, at 9:00-10:00 PM in my little Catholic school uniform, I'm amazed at how hard my guardian angel had to work to keep me from harm.)

Anyway, one night I got to the bus stop and tripped and fell. My glasses fell off and I was so blind that I couldnt see to find them. Many buses stopped at that bus stop and I had to ask the driver of each one if his bus was the xxx one. It was really scary not being able to see -- and I had to miss school for a few days until my replacement glasses were available. After that, my parents bought me an extra pair of glasses.

And, yes, when I had my replacement glasses, I did look for my original pair at the bus stop. I found them in the street, where they had been run over many times.
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Old 09-25-2018, 09:37 PM
exm
 
Location: Long Island, NY
1,940 posts, read 613,696 times
Reputation: 1203
I had PRK (alternative to Lasik) done 11 years ago when I was 34. My -6 vision was corrected to 20/15, and I have not regretted it one bit. Right now my eyes regressed due to aging and I'm -1.5 nearsighted. Close-up vision is still perfect. I purchased a pair of prescription sunglasses for driving and bought a few cheap glasses of eBay for home.


Mono-vision correction is an option but I am okay with my situation. No complains about laser eye correction from my perspective.
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Old 09-26-2018, 01:11 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
3,207 posts, read 2,143,895 times
Reputation: 3840
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Get multifocal contacts - I hateg going to readers with contacts - multifocals allow me to see well - they actually do 3 different distances to account for computer work, too.
Tried it and I didn't like the compromise which is the same reason I didn't like the monovision. I like to see clear from both eyes ALL the time, so no it wouldn't matter if it was 3 days or 3 months, same outcome.
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Old 09-26-2018, 01:14 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
3,207 posts, read 2,143,895 times
Reputation: 3840
Quote:
Originally Posted by TFW46 View Post
And you've never had monovision lasik so you cant compare it with monovision
It's the same and I wouldn't spend thousands just to find out, Duh. You can't change your mind can you?
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Old 09-26-2018, 01:23 PM
 
14,930 posts, read 19,196,424 times
Reputation: 20794
Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
It's the same and I wouldn't spend thousands just to find out, Duh. You can't change your mind can you?

Why would I want to change my mind? My lasik was the best experience of my life, an experience that's lasted 13 years and shows no signs of diminishing. As I said, I dont care if you like it or not -- I just hope you dont discourage others from trying it since you have no first-hand experience with it.
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Old 09-26-2018, 01:38 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
3,207 posts, read 2,143,895 times
Reputation: 3840
Quote:
Originally Posted by TFW46 View Post
As I said, I dont care if you like it or not -- I just hope you dont discourage others from trying it since you have no first-hand experience with it.
Really? It sure seems like you care, at least twice you have defended it. Do you have some vested interest in it? and I don't think a comment from a stranger on a public forum is going to make a difference one way or another. I hope people have a little more sense than that. I am stating MY opinion and am entitled to it.
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Old 09-26-2018, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
13,971 posts, read 7,909,187 times
Reputation: 28388
Quote:
Originally Posted by TFW46 View Post
I have monovision and it's not "one eye blurry, one eye" clear for me. The sight in both eyes is very clear and I cant tell which eye is closeup and which eye is distance. When I'm reading, the closeup-vision eye automatically takes over and when I'm driving or doing anything else, the distance-vision eye automatically takes over.

At the age of 72 I dont have to use reading glasses.

If you read the other posts in this thread, you'd see that others also have monovision and really like it. I'm not here to try to convince you. I dont care if you want it or not but I do care that you're spreading incorrect ideas about what it's like.
Exactly. Many people are satisfied with monovision, whether they achieve this with contacts, LASIK, their natural vision, or sometimes glasses. With monovision, your brain blends the images together so the slight blur up close in one eye and far away in the other is minimized and both eyes work together like they always do. People don't usually realize that just like handedness, one eye normally sees better than the other and everyone has a dominant eye. In monovision, the doctor normally selects the dominant eye as your distance vision eye and your nondominant eye for the reading. I've done monovision and multifocal contact lenses and strangely, monovision contacts work better for me than multifocal. I don't notice the tiny bit of blur at all but some people are pickier about their vision and it bothers them.
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Old 09-28-2018, 12:55 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
9,319 posts, read 16,439,732 times
Reputation: 11352
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post
Interesting to read some testimonies on longevity of this procedure.
I only know 4 folks (over 40 ) that got it done. 6/7 yrs later and it's gradually dissipating in perfect vision. The persons were advised it's not a lifetime fix.

I had it done at age 37 in 1997..... and have loved it ever since.....


I did not need to use readers, or as I call them, cheaters, until I got into my early 50's, but am definitely dependent on them now......


I have developed some dry eye and halos or stars around lights at night and I am not always as confident in my perfect vision when I am driving at night, so recently had my eyes checked and got a new pair of prescription glasses..... but really only feel the need to use them when I, or my eyes, are tired.......





Quote:
Originally Posted by TFW46 View Post
I understand.

I was wearing ultra-thick bifocals in high school. My all-girls school was downtown so I rode the city bus to and from my suburban area. I often stayed very late at school because of many after-school activities and walked to the bus stop late at night. (When I look back now at how I walked 10 blocks down Texas Avenue in downtown Houston, past sleazy bars and the bus station, at 9:00-10:00 PM in my little Catholic school uniform, I'm amazed at how hard my guardian angel had to work to keep me from harm.)

Anyway, one night I got to the bus stop and tripped and fell. My glasses fell off and I was so blind that I couldnt see to find them. Many buses stopped at that bus stop and I had to ask the driver of each one if his bus was the xxx one. It was really scary not being able to see -- and I had to miss school for a few days until my replacement glasses were available. After that, my parents bought me an extra pair of glasses.

And, yes, when I had my replacement glasses, I did look for my original pair at the bus stop. I found them in the street, where they had been run over many times.

St. Agnes girl?? I went to Marion in the mid-70's.......
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Old 01-19-2019, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Floribama
14,078 posts, read 30,256,272 times
Reputation: 12700
Have any of you ever had the newer Ďbladelessí LASIK done? Iím seriously considering this type because it has always been the blade thing making the flap that freaks me out. Iím 39, and I have been wearing contacts since I was 15. I am so sick of that routine every morning and night, and I hate wearing my glasses because they make me feel like I have tunnel vision, especially in big open spaces.
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Old 01-21-2019, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
3,746 posts, read 3,023,413 times
Reputation: 6600
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Have any of you ever had the newer Ďbladelessí LASIK done? Iím seriously considering this type because it has always been the blade thing making the flap that freaks me out. Iím 39, and I have been wearing contacts since I was 15. I am so sick of that routine every morning and night, and I hate wearing my glasses because they make me feel like I have tunnel vision, especially in big open spaces.
? Bladeless LASIK is not "new", approved by the FDA and called iLASIK in 2007. I doubt anyone is using microkeratones to slice corneas anymore, at least for this procedure.

Lasers are coherent beams of light, visible or not to the human eye, that incinerate flesh and most anything else they hit by exciting (heating) the molecules*. A flap is thus blasted/burned away on your eye vs. using a blade to slice the flesh the good old fashioned way. 2nd Century BC Roman Short Sword vs. 21st Century femtosecond laser, what difference does it make in terms of tech, a means to an end?

Both sever corneal nerves. They don't grow back. That's believed to be what causes dry eyes: no more reflex tear secretion on your now-damaged corneas. Good luck living with that, on the off chance it occurs. I've never heard a coherent story as to exactly the rate of complications, mostly because there is no way to accurate know without detailed surveying and there is every reason for doctors to not want to know. I pulled the goalie on the procedure ten days prior, in 2010, for just that reason. Too, the industry is a racket, that being a cash-cow to practitioners under a stealth of lack of information and somewhat-deceptive marketing using weasel-words. I finally puzzled that out, a little late, and realized my doctor who is well-published in corneal research was a quack just like the rest of them.

Modern contact lenses can be bifocal, trifocal, or even progressive. Guess the LASIK quacks didn't mention that? I spotted a press release late 2016, so this is a real-recent thing. Summer 2017 I was fitted with daily wear multifocals and guess what: no more presbyopia. Reading glasses are for old people, thanks, and kiss those goodbye until further notice, I'm hoping my 70s or beyond (I'm 51).

LASIK stooges need to be prosecuted and put in prison for not quantifying the risks, mild to *catastrophic*, in a way most people can understand. If they do, it's obfuscated in obtuse language or double-talk. The odds as I understand them are 80% for complete success, 20% for some sort of complication mild to awful, for both eyes. I cannot quote a source at this time, so YMMV.

The idea of going in for "enhancements" ten or twenty years post LASIK due to shifting vision is twice as bogus. I'll just change my contact lens power on that day, thanks.

* There is a type of laser than cools, as well, with a more-abstruse explanation as to how, exactly.

**In recent years, excimer laser corneal refractive surgery developed rapidly due to its good safety, efficacy and predictability. However, complications have also attracted wide attention. Dry eye is the most common complication and dissatisfaction after the excimer laser keratomileusis (LASIK). Main reason of dry eye is the mechanical nerve injury by making the corneal flap caused by LASIK surgery. Since the corneal flap cuts off all the nerves outside the pedicle, which results in corneal sensitivity significantly diminished and directly blocks the reflex tear secretion which leads to dry eye." from, "Effects of nerve growth factor on nerve regeneration after corneal nerve damage" (2014), US National Library of Medicine

Also an excellent search term, same database: "Lasers, Excimer/adverse effects" which pulled up 75 articles.
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