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Old 10-10-2018, 05:13 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
62 posts, read 43,800 times
Reputation: 292

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66 years old, 5'8" 150 lbs, only major health issue is spinal stenosis with occasional sciatica. MRI says L3 disc herniation affecting L3 and L4 nerve roots.

Pain is the worst getting out of bed in the morning, also walking or standing for more than 10 minutes. Sitting for five minutes eases the pain so I can walk some more before having to rest again.

Had a steroid injection, did nothing. Do stretching exercises they don't help much either.

I can ride my bike 30 miles and feel fine, since leaning forward opens the spinal canal. But I would like to be able to walk without pain for the rest of my life.

Don't want to have surgery... has anyone here had a laminectomy and does that provide permanent relief?
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Old 10-10-2018, 06:08 PM
 
18,756 posts, read 6,119,541 times
Reputation: 12657
Quote:
Originally Posted by nbseer View Post
66 years old, 5'8" 150 lbs, only major health issue is spinal stenosis with occasional sciatica. MRI says L3 disc herniation affecting L3 and L4 nerve roots.

Pain is the worst getting out of bed in the morning, also walking or standing for more than 10 minutes. Sitting for five minutes eases the pain so I can walk some more before having to rest again.

Had a steroid injection, did nothing. Do stretching exercises they don't help much either.

I can ride my bike 30 miles and feel fine, since leaning forward opens the spinal canal. But I would like to be able to walk without pain for the rest of my life.

Don't want to have surgery... has anyone here had a laminectomy and does that provide permanent relief?
I can relate and I'm 80, lived with a lower back issue starting at 18. I have no desire to have surgery. I've heard stories of one leading to another and then another and then another....etc.

Wearing a back support does help me. I'm fine laying down and sleeping and sitting too long everything compresses but I carry on.

I just posted on Supplement area here about an herb that is supposed to help ligaments and tendons and I'm holding some hope when I get on it, but not holding my breath...some relief would help.

I take ibuprofen and take stomach protectors to support my stomach lining.

You could look into Prolotherapy and consider PRP injections. Steroid injections are worthless in my mind and they weaken bones anyway.

I can bend over and with laminectomy I believe there are pins placed in the spine, and I hear some can't bend over...but again back surgery is just not my M.O.

I live with complications from hip replacement which affected my back too.

I do a lot of stretching from when I wake up to when I go to sleep, Work to keep back stretched out as much as I know how.

Whether PT would help you, don't know.

Last edited by jaminhealth; 10-10-2018 at 06:27 PM..
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Old 10-10-2018, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Willamette valley, oregon
2,368 posts, read 637,830 times
Reputation: 3329
I don't know anything about a laminectomy, but I do know that stretching and core strengthening exercises do help. Surgery should be the last resort. There are a lot of online videos about stretching and core exercises. Check out Hasfit, easy on the joints and clear instructions. I wish you the best in your recovery!
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Old 10-10-2018, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,631 posts, read 53,468,042 times
Reputation: 18533
I had a fusion over L4-L5-S1 in 1992. I was perfect for 10-11 yrs then L3-L4 began breaking down. I can still bend over just fine and I am in WAY less pain than before! I would do it again in a heartbeat!
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Old 10-10-2018, 07:49 PM
 
18,756 posts, read 6,119,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
I had a fusion over L4-L5-S1 in 1992. I was perfect for 10-11 yrs then L3-L4 began breaking down. I can still bend over just fine and I am in WAY less pain than before! I would do it again in a heartbeat!
Did you do another surgery for L3-L4?
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Old 10-10-2018, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Central IL
13,336 posts, read 7,115,490 times
Reputation: 31010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willamette City View Post
I don't know anything about a laminectomy, but I do know that stretching and core strengthening exercises do help. Surgery should be the last resort. There are a lot of online videos about stretching and core exercises. Check out Hasfit, easy on the joints and clear instructions. I wish you the best in your recovery!
I would second doing stretching and core exercises, as appropriate. Get a recommendation from your doctor or from a physical therapist. After having issues with a substitute yoga instructor who was more intent on showing off than actually instructing I was having lingering back issues. I found myself avoiding things that I thought would hurt and the inactivity just made things worse. Now I stretch twice a day - actually in bed just before going to sleep and in bed before I get up. That and ab work/core exercises have allowed me to again pick stuff up off the floor without groaning.
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Old 10-10-2018, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Mesa AZ
102 posts, read 28,936 times
Reputation: 290
I have lived for over 30 years with back pain after being hit by a runaway car. I currently have 7 herniated discs, some cervical some lumbar and stenosis at 5 levels. I have very few flare ups and I give credit to staying as active as possible and always having support for my lower back when sitting. Do not ever sit without lower back support if you are leaning back, and don't do things that cause pain. You MUST learn the signs that warn you your pain is about to get much worse if you don't stop what you are doing. Sometimes you must change your plans and save heavy tasks for another day. Lift with your knees not your back.

It has been proven that chiropractic care is the most effective way to treat lower back pain, be cautious with your neck. I don't let my chiropractor adjust my neck unless it is flared up. I have had most of my bad flareups stopped instantly by getting adjusted, some residual pain clears up within a day or 2. Ibuprofen has some serious risk to it but it can really help a flare up and I use it occasionally. Too much alcohol causes dehydration and I will have pain all over the next day.

Learn about what foods you are eating that cause inflammation and eliminate them. Don't drink soda, it is acidic and leaches calcium from your bones which contributes to bone loss which leads to narrowing of the spinal canal and worsening stenosis. We all shrink as we age, try to prevent this. Read up on Boron and its effect on arthritis and calcium distribution in your body. All those hot springs where people get cured of all kinds of problems are high in Boron. You will be shocked at all the things Boron does for your health.
The reason you hear so little about Boron is the same story with everything else in life, if no one can make money off of something it wont be well known.
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Old 10-10-2018, 08:35 PM
 
18,756 posts, read 6,119,541 times
Reputation: 12657
Farmer Larry: I just posted new info on dosing in Supplements here. I was not taking enough and from research am now taking 6mg two times daily and from another friend about the form of boron which I have in the Supplement posting. The research says that countries with high boron in soils have far less arthritis.
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Old 10-10-2018, 10:40 PM
 
2,682 posts, read 958,560 times
Reputation: 5117
I have read that there's a lot of spinal surgery and it provides not enough relief. I've known some people who have had a lot of back surgery and it doesn't seem to resolve the issues. I've never known anyone who had ONE back surgery, if you see what I mean.

So I agree that if it were me, I'd try anything else first. I used to ice skate in my 40s and when I fell and hurt my back I wore something supportive that really helped, also did core exercises (start easy with those) and kept moving. Improve your posture; that helps, too, and I second a good support while sitting. Ice and Advil if it's really inflamed.

I wouldn't do the core stuff without someone else to help, either a yoga instructor or personal trainer or someone. Strengthening the muscles around your spine helps them hold up some of the weight of your upper body. Otherwise, fully half your body weight is on that spine alone, and with poor posture it's on it unevenly. But core exercises are hard and you can do more harm if you don't work up to them slowly.
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Old 10-11-2018, 05:46 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
1,648 posts, read 627,147 times
Reputation: 3298
Very important point:---sciatica is a "pinch" of the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve innervates the foot, lower leg and most of the thigh. It does NOT innervate the back, so back pain is a separate problem from sciatica.


The radiologist does not want to be accused of missing something, so he NEVER reads an x-ray or CT scan as "normal." "Central herniation" of a disc is the common reading when there's nothing wrong. Discs don't herniate centrally-- they follow the path of least resistance-- that's down the root canal, one side or the other....My point here is that your "abnormal" CT scan may or may not mean anything. If you have sciatica- pain &/or numbness &/or weakness somewhere down the leg or foot, then the sciatic nerve is irritated, but it may not be the disc. It may also be from a muscle spasm where the nerve travels thru the butt or hip area. (Stretches will help that.)


Spina stenosis, OTOH, signifies a narrowing of the spinal canal-- the spinal cord runs thru that-- and that could "pinch" any of the spinal nerves. Surgery for that can produce scarring which may again pinch the nerves-- maybe worse than you stated with. Newer, less invasive surgery is being done making that less of a problem, but surgeons are still reluctant to do surgery for this problem. (Maybe Bluedevilz has some more authoritative comments about this?)


Most "low back pain" comes from unequal muscle tension in the R & L psoas muscles. One side will go into spasm from fatigue from standing too long in one spot, from excessive walking or working or doing "one sided" work, like shoveling, for instance-- particularly if one leg is longer than the other. Proper stretching, strengthening and maybe a lift in the heel of the shoe of the shorter leg will help alleviate and prevent the problem. Flexing the glutes will get the psoas to relax by natural reflex.
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