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Old 11-03-2018, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Canada
269 posts, read 132,924 times
Reputation: 99

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Hello so I would like to inform I been having pain for 1 year now on and off with my abdominal Rectus muscle, the whole muscle from the bottom of my rib cage all the way to the top of the groin. The pain seems to happen when sleeping on my side (Because my abdomen bends) or when Im sleeping on a very soft surface (Causing my abdomen to bend). Anything that makes my abdomen force and move makes it sore.. It is becoming annoying because when I get the pain it takes about 2 weeks for it to die down ... but than will come back doing anything that requires work on my abdominal muscles.. The pain does hurt and they feel sore all the time.

I went to the hospital and they were pressing on my abdomen and told me there appears to be no abdominal hernia anywhere.. They also did an ultrasound (They claim it can also see a hernia or serious tears..) and everything was normal..

Should I maybe work out the muscles in the abdomen rectus part? Because I never really exercise, could it be the muscles are very weak making them prone to getting sore by any movements and positions ?

Should I do Planks and sit ups? To strengthen my core muscles?

Thanks everyone!
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Old 11-03-2018, 10:03 AM
 
20,324 posts, read 15,687,589 times
Reputation: 7441
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whale12 View Post
Hello so I would like to inform I been having pain for 1 year now on and off with my abdominal Rectus muscle, the whole muscle from the bottom of my rib cage all the way to the top of the groin. The pain seems to happen when sleeping on my side (Because my abdomen bends) or when Im sleeping on a very soft surface (Causing my abdomen to bend). Anything that makes my abdomen force and move makes it sore.. It is becoming annoying because when I get the pain it takes about 2 weeks for it to die down ... but than will come back doing anything that requires work on my abdominal muscles.. The pain does hurt and they feel sore all the time.

I went to the hospital and they were pressing on my abdomen and told me there appears to be no abdominal hernia anywhere.. They also did an ultrasound (They claim it can also see a hernia or serious tears..) and everything was normal..

Should I maybe work out the muscles in the abdomen rectus part? Because I never really exercise, could it be the muscles are very weak making them prone to getting sore by any movements and positions ?

Should I do Planks and sit ups? To strengthen my core muscles?

Thanks everyone!
If the doctors have said that you don't have a hernia and that everything is normal, then there is no reason not to exercise in order to strengthen the abdominal muscles. Planks are an excellent way to work the entire abdominal region.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvxNkmjdhMM

However, there are also other exercises you should do for your core. You can check them out on YouTube.

But even though the doctor at the hospital said that everything seems normal, you might also want to check with your regular doctor if you have one just to make sure.
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Old 11-03-2018, 12:09 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
1,698 posts, read 642,023 times
Reputation: 3383
The abd. rectus is the only muscle we have that doesn't "move" anything-- their purpose is merely protection/support of our innards. The only exercise you really need to do to strengthen them is to flex them. (it's the psoas mm that moves us in doing sit-ups.)


A CT scan may find a Spigelian hernia (partial thickness tear) missed by US.


Could you have adhesions- a frequent complication after surgery? The scars may have your guts on a short leash, so to speak, and give you a painful tug when you reach the end of the line.
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Old 11-03-2018, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Canada
269 posts, read 132,924 times
Reputation: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
The abd. rectus is the only muscle we have that doesn't "move" anything-- their purpose is merely protection/support of our innards. The only exercise you really need to do to strengthen them is to flex them. (it's the psoas mm that moves us in doing sit-ups.)


A CT scan may find a Spigelian hernia (partial thickness tear) missed by US.


Could you have adhesions- a frequent complication after surgery? The scars may have your guts on a short leash, so to speak, and give you a painful tug when you reach the end of the line.

The thing is almost a year ago when they pain started around.. I did have a CT scan with Iodine for a better view.. everything looked normal they said.
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Old 11-03-2018, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,578 posts, read 26,222,559 times
Reputation: 26628
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
The abd. rectus is the only muscle we have that doesn't "move" anything-- their purpose is merely protection/support of our innards. The only exercise you really need to do to strengthen them is to flex them. (it's the psoas mm that moves us in doing sit-ups.).
Rectus Abdominis Muscle

"The rectus abdominis muscle performs the important task of flexing the torso and spine in the abdominal region. It does this by pulling the ribcage closer to the pelvis. The rectus abdominis can also tense to contract the abdomen without moving the torso, as in sucking in one’s gut. Contraction of the abdomen results in increased pressure within the abdominopelvic cavity and is useful to push substances out of the body during exhalation, defecation, and urination."

Situps:

https://www.livestrong.com/article/5...-to-do-situps/

The psoas pulls the thighs toward the torso. it flexes the hip joint.
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Old 11-03-2018, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,578 posts, read 26,222,559 times
Reputation: 26628
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whale12 View Post
Hello so I would like to inform I been having pain for 1 year now on and off with my abdominal Rectus muscle, the whole muscle from the bottom of my rib cage all the way to the top of the groin. The pain seems to happen when sleeping on my side (Because my abdomen bends) or when Im sleeping on a very soft surface (Causing my abdomen to bend). Anything that makes my abdomen force and move makes it sore.. It is becoming annoying because when I get the pain it takes about 2 weeks for it to die down ... but than will come back doing anything that requires work on my abdominal muscles.. The pain does hurt and they feel sore all the time.

I went to the hospital and they were pressing on my abdomen and told me there appears to be no abdominal hernia anywhere.. They also did an ultrasound (They claim it can also see a hernia or serious tears..) and everything was normal..

Should I maybe work out the muscles in the abdomen rectus part? Because I never really exercise, could it be the muscles are very weak making them prone to getting sore by any movements and positions ?

Should I do Planks and sit ups? To strengthen my core muscles?

Thanks everyone!
Is the pain on one side of the abdomen or both?

Has nerve entrapment been considered?

https://academic.oup.com/bjaed/article/15/2/60/248606
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Old Today, 09:46 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
1,698 posts, read 642,023 times
Reputation: 3383
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Rectus Abdominis Muscle

"The rectus abdominis muscle performs the important task of flexing the torso and spine in the abdominal region. It does this by pulling the ribcage closer to the pelvis. The rectus abdominis can also tense to contract the abdomen without moving the torso, as in sucking in one’s gut. Contraction of the abdomen results in increased pressure within the abdominopelvic cavity and is useful to push substances out of the body during exhalation, defecation, and urination."

Situps:

https://www.livestrong.com/article/5...-to-do-situps/

The psoas pulls the thighs toward the torso. it flexes the hip joint.


I'll argue with the "important" part of the description. The ab. rectus does not cross a joint. It connects ribs to pelvis. The paraspinous mm flex, extend & rotate the vertebrae. You can move your ears a little by flexing your masseters, but that's not what they're for.


If you hold your thighs still, then flexing the psoas results in a sit up. Hold the torso still and it's a leg raise. Same dif. Of course, it's pretty difficult to do a sit up without tensing your abs, but easy to do the opposite. "Flexing a joint" means you're decreasing the angle at the joint; "extending" means increasing the angle. We often incorrectly use the word "flex" when we mean "contract" in regards a muscle.
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Old Today, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,578 posts, read 26,222,559 times
Reputation: 26628
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
I'll argue with the "important" part of the description. The ab. rectus does not cross a joint. It connects ribs to pelvis. The paraspinous mm flex, extend & rotate the vertebrae. You can move your ears a little by flexing your masseters, but that's not what they're for.


If you hold your thighs still, then flexing the psoas results in a sit up. Hold the torso still and it's a leg raise. Same dif. Of course, it's pretty difficult to do a sit up without tensing your abs, but easy to do the opposite. "Flexing a joint" means you're decreasing the angle at the joint; "extending" means increasing the angle. We often incorrectly use the word "flex" when we mean "contract" in regards a muscle.
Contracting the rectus flexes the spine. Contracting the psoas flexes the hip.

Cute animation:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwljsCs1agM
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