U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-16-2018, 11:02 AM
 
17,722 posts, read 15,076,360 times
Reputation: 33518

Advertisements

There is no way to donate them, as no health practitioner would give them to a patient if they didn't come from a pharmacy filled specifically for that person. There is a crazy amount of waste in this area. In the nursing homes I work in they throw meds out all the time. If someone gets a new med, and the pharmacy delivers it, then the person dies before they've had even one dose of it, they are still required by law to toss it, even if they have 30 other residents who take the same med in the same dosage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-16-2018, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
988 posts, read 1,131,638 times
Reputation: 823
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanBev View Post
Walgreens I have seen advertised as a place to get rid of drugs.
They also destroy them. The OP was asking about donating them to other people - which is not allowed under pharmacy laws.

The issue is that once something has been dispensed, there is no way of knowing whether anything has been done to the medication before it is returned. There is also the issue of potential contamination just from handling (pharmacy staff does not touch the pills).

The only circumstance under which return might be possible is meds in an original container with the factory seal intact - which is not how most of us get pills from the pharmacy. Since the OP already said that some of the medication has been taken, this wouldn't apply.

Last edited by orca17; 11-16-2018 at 01:31 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2018, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
21,296 posts, read 15,598,419 times
Reputation: 24255
Many cities and possibly some retail pharmacies now do a prescription drug take-back program. Improper disposable of these medicines means they can easily contaminate the water supply.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2018, 04:40 PM
 
7,884 posts, read 5,507,783 times
Reputation: 14688
Quote:
Originally Posted by orca17 View Post
They also destroy them. The OP was asking about donating them to other people - which is not allowed under pharmacy laws.

The issue is that once something has been dispensed, there is no way of knowing whether anything has been done to the medication before it is returned. There is also the issue of potential contamination just from handling (pharmacy staff does not touch the pills).

The only circumstance under which return might be possible is meds in an original container with the factory seal intact - which is not how most of us get pills from the pharmacy. Since the OP already said that some of the medication has been taken, this wouldn't apply.
Once Rxs leave the pharmacy, they are not returnable.

As for donating, see my earlier post
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2018, 04:42 PM
 
7,884 posts, read 5,507,783 times
Reputation: 14688
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthofHere View Post
No, unfortunately as others stated you can't give away prescriptions to be used by someone else. Next time a doctor prescribes a medication ask him or her to write two prescriptions, one for a 10-15 day and one for the three months. Fill the 10-15 day and if you tolerate it then have the 3 months one filled. Too many prescriptions are being filled that only go to waste. It should be a requirement when a new prescription is written. It would greatly reduce insurance costs. Also talk to your doctor when you experience side affects. Sometimes side affects like nausea go away as you use the meds and your system gets used to it.
A 10-15 day supply can cost more than full Rx in many cases..

Why? Ask your insurance company
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2018, 04:44 PM
 
7,884 posts, read 5,507,783 times
Reputation: 14688
Quote:
Originally Posted by purehuman View Post
Not really.....the meds were no doubt "needed", but the patient never thought to try a few days worth before filling out a larger prescription.
Doctors fault as far as I'm concerned.
No, it's the insurance companies fault
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2018, 10:01 PM
 
2,596 posts, read 3,175,200 times
Reputation: 6740
When my mother passed away, we had a ton of medicine - much unopened and valuable. We donated everything useful to our local hospice organization - pain medicine, nausea medicines etc... One of the hospice nurses knew of a diabetic patient with limited income and we gave her all of our diabetes medicine/supplies. One nurse we knew volunteered with an organization that traveled to central america every year and we gave her everything else to bring down to the clinics there. They were happy to have it.

If you put out some feelers at your local clinics, medical/nursing schools, hospitals, hospice programs etc... you can prevent waste of this valuable medicine.

Last edited by sfcambridge; 11-16-2018 at 10:58 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 06:29 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,281 posts, read 4,051,386 times
Reputation: 19268
Quote:
Originally Posted by jencam View Post
True, but people should be aware it's illegal. I was kept on the side of the road by a state trooper for hours combing through my stuff. It all ended up coming down to one muscle relaxer that was not in it's bottle. I don't remember why. Maybe because there was only one left and so I tossed it (Soma) into the bottle of flexiril.

I will never forget that experience. He was suspicious of my ibuprofen. It was orange. I said that is how costco makes them! (or they did at the time, IDK about now).

He could have taken me to jail for that one Soma and made that really clear. If it had been in a bottle with someone else's name, I would have gone to jail.

He did like a roadside lie detector I guess. Look me in the eye and tell me this was prescribed to you. They pulled at panels in my car like they thought I was a drug mule. It was wild. One does NOT want to have a controlled substance of any schedule on them unless it's in the bottle with one's name on it, that is for sure.

It is no different than having crack. If it's a controlled substance prescribed to someone else, it is just as illegal as drugs that are inherently illegal.

Well I guess I'm screwed if I ever get stopped because I'm not carrying around 4 bottles of pills in the event I am away from home when it's time to take my BP meds, etc. I put them in a pill case. I guess I could take a picture of the prescription bottle with my name on it and keep it in my phone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 09:22 AM
 
8,338 posts, read 17,834,150 times
Reputation: 10921
I totally get your point, but you’d be better off just disposing of them.

Do not give them away, do not attempt to donate them (no competent organization would take
then) and don’t ‘save’ them as they will expire.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 12:28 PM
 
1,400 posts, read 560,561 times
Reputation: 2438
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
I think this problem is only becoming worse as many insurance plans force you into 90-day supplies. I had one medication of a nasal spray where I got 13(!!!!) for a 90-day supply and of course insurance wouldn’t cover anything but that. Let’s just say I never used the entire 90-day supply within a year because I only needed it about 3 months out of the year for seasonal allergies and one lasts about a month. My current insurance doesn’t require a 90-day supply but I still get harangued about it for medicines I use as needed and pick up one every 2-3 months. Why would I want a 3-month supply when I am using a one-month supply every 3 months?
This is the reason we need medical reform. If a doctor prescribes a smaller prescription than 90 days there is a reason for it. I can understand the insurance companies if it is a prescription someone has been using for years and will continue to use it; however, when it is newly prescribed they should limit it to 30 days or less to make sure it is tolerated by the patient and if it is as needed it should be filled for no more than one month at a time. If you have this issue, see if your doctor has samples as sometimes they do or in the case of your nasal spray if there is an over the counter option. No wonder we have a drug problem in this country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top