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Old Yesterday, 12:33 PM
 
8,406 posts, read 8,661,923 times
Reputation: 26189

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
I know that's probably what it sounds like, but it's just that until two days ago, I'd never ever heard of a D.O. I'm honestly pretty fed up with most of the M.D.s I've seen in the past, and I love the idea of having another option. I definitely do intend to give this guy a shot and I'm going to go in to see him with the idea that I'm going to be happy with my decision. I guess I'm just kind of blown away by my own ignorance on the subject, and am looking for confirmation that this guy's degree represents the same level of knowledge I would expect to find in someone with an M.D. degree.
Katz,

Did you know there is even a D.O. school in Utah now?

Its down in Ivins, Utah. Rocky Vista School of Medicine.

I'll just make a few observations. D.O.'s get essentially the same training that M.D.'s get. What makes a doctor in my view is his or her residency. D.O.'s do residency training the same way M.D.'s do and go through the same "match" process when they graduate from medical school. Both are licensed physicians.

My understanding is that DO training does include some training in manipulating the spine. Its sort of like chiropractic, but a little more scientific. Also, its a small part of what they learn to do.

DO's tend to be more based in primary care specialties. Its also my observation that they tend to be more patient centered than M.D.s. Although, please don't take this as my slighting M.D.s. My wife currently sees a D.O. and I think she is a phenomenal doctor. In many ways, I'd like to switch to her, but I can't. Its hard for me to explain, but the relationship I have with my current family doctor is a longstanding relationship (20 years) and we both are extremely loyal to one another.

I hope that helps you making a decision.
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Old Yesterday, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,628 posts, read 79,964,043 times
Reputation: 38989
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
I just got an appointment with a new doctor whose specialty is Family Practice. I noticed the absence of an MD after his name and the presence of a DO instead. I did a little bit of googling on the subject, but would really like some input from people who have used doctors with a DO degree. Is this considered "alternative medicine"? Is it homeopathic in nature? Are these doctors really a good as doctors with a traditional MD? I've always liked the idea of going to a doctor who looks at me as a whole person and not just as a collection of body parts, so the idea of a DO is appealing in that regard. On the other hand, I'm a little bit suspicious of "Eastern Medicine," even though I can't really say why -- unfounded prejudices maybe. Anyway, all input would be very much appreciated.
we love our DO, The reason we started using him had to do with my not liking my PC MD and hubby's leaving the area. Our DO is caring, considerate and relaxed but still on top of everything. It used to be DOs were more into alternative medicine but not so much anymore. I have also noticed an increase in them the past few years in our area. The best advise is to see your new doctor and judge for yourself. BTW I understand your feeling about "Eastern Medicine" I agree.
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Old Yesterday, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,628 posts, read 79,964,043 times
Reputation: 38989
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
My current PCP is a DO. I can't see any difference between her and any MD I've had--they perform the same exams, and prescribe the same treatments. She has admitting privileges at the same local hospital, and she refers me to the same specialists. She tries to wean me off my prescriptions every couple of years, but I've had MDs do the same thing. I don't see any difference.
Actually I think weaning off some of our meds is a good thing, not a bad thing. I think doctors are too anxious to have you pop a pill. Our granddaughter, who is a Nurse practitioner fells we are over medicated.

Rugrats: does is really make any difference which school is the harder to get into? It is the final product that matters.
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Old Yesterday, 12:46 PM
 
3,135 posts, read 1,256,277 times
Reputation: 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
I would appreciate responses from anyone to the phrases I've underlined and put in boldface.
Osteopathic medicine is basically physical medicine with a more holistic approach. It focuses more on the physical exam with the focus on the “physical” being hands-on. Back in the old days 30-40 years ago when we had fewer tests, many MDs were more hands on too. Now not so much. One of the complaints of older doctors is that MDs now can rely too heavily on tests... they have lost the ability to do a good physical exam. DOs learn how to do this and interpret tests.

In areas that are test interpretation heavy, DOs tend not to match as easily because that is not the focus of osteopathy medicine. For example, radiology is not an area where a DO is likely to excel. Anesthesiology is popular... that is often pain management, but it is much more physical. Family medicine and internal medicine are also popular.
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Old Yesterday, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Southern California
19,247 posts, read 6,372,258 times
Reputation: 12988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
I know that's probably what it sounds like, but it's just that until two days ago, I'd never ever heard of a D.O. I'm honestly pretty fed up with most of the M.D.s I've seen in the past, and I love the idea of having another option. I definitely do intend to give this guy a shot and I'm going to go in to see him with the idea that I'm going to be happy with my decision. I guess I'm just kind of blown away by my own ignorance on the subject, and am looking for confirmation that this guy's degree represents the same level of knowledge I would expect to find in someone with an M.D. degree.
If this is your first encounter with the D.O. doctor, then I guess I kinda understand. I'm so alternative in my thinking of healing and my first D.O. goes back to my 30's and I'm 80...my D.O. worked into his 90's on a PT basis. Terrific doctor, one of a kind.

My daughter and her children have been seeing a D.O. for bodywork and good health advice, and the D.O. moved out of our area, so they miss her so much. My neighbor too, was seeing this D.O. for her body and she also misses Cindy. So Cal is loaded with alternative licensed healers and I love that.

Good wishes and hope you can relax with a decision and get what you are looking for.
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Old Yesterday, 12:49 PM
 
11,961 posts, read 9,724,369 times
Reputation: 16383
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
we love our DO, The reason we started using him had to do with my not liking my PC MD and hubby's leaving the area. Our DO is caring, considerate and relaxed but still on top of everything. It used to be DOs were more into alternative medicine but not so much anymore. I have also noticed an increase in them the past few years in our area. The best advise is to see your new doctor and judge for yourself. BTW I understand your feeling about "Eastern Medicine" I agree.
I have noticed that in some ways, my DOs are into a kind of "holistic" approach, in the sense that they sometimes see one potential thing (or lack of a better word, whether it be physical or not that is affecting the body) as possibly affecting multiple parts of the body and causing multiple issues, and one of those might be stress, for example, in my case. So they advised me to try various stress reliving methods and see what works for me, but also ordered diagnostic tests to ensure nothing more serious was wrong for certain symptoms I was having. They didn't just assume something was physically wrong with me, they gave me a range of other options that could explain how and what I was feeling, but also ensured nothing was physically wrong with me. Idk if I explained this well, it's kind of hard to explain. Maybe some MDs do this as well, but I can only speak anecdotally from my own experience.

My DOs prescribe antibiotics and other medications, seem fully integrated with medicine MDs would engage in and the my past MDs engaged in. Like I said, I noticed no difference, certainly not one for the worst at least. Others may disagree but every doctor is different, everyone's experience is different, maybe even with the same doctor.

I don't really know what holistic doctors or alternative medicine doctors even do, I don't consider mine to be that way and I don't think anyone else would, either, and they don't even identify themselves in such a way. So I agree that at least where I am, there seems to be little to no difference between those who practice with each degree.
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Old Yesterday, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Southern California
19,247 posts, read 6,372,258 times
Reputation: 12988
Jersey Girl: That is where the Integrative MD comes into the picture, they will have the patient work with supplements, hormones, etc etc etc before starting to give them a pharma drug for their issue(s). I found these type MD's probably 20 yrs ago and can't go back to the doctors who go right for the drugs. Then of course, I do so much of my own health research -- all makes so much sense to me to add (supplement) what our bodies are losing as we age. I don't believe I supplemented before menopause, and now today so many are going this route for their issues. From my point of view and thinking, I believe a lot of the younger population have seen their parents kinda messed up on their pharma drugs and want to go the other way. I see that with my grandkids.

Last edited by jaminhealth; Yesterday at 02:06 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,321 posts, read 21,009,347 times
Reputation: 10016
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
Katz,

Did you know there is even a D.O. school in Utah now?

Its down in Ivins, Utah. Rocky Vista School of Medicine.

I'll just make a few observations. D.O.'s get essentially the same training that M.D.'s get. What makes a doctor in my view is his or her residency. D.O.'s do residency training the same way M.D.'s do and go through the same "match" process when they graduate from medical school. Both are licensed physicians.

My understanding is that DO training does include some training in manipulating the spine. Its sort of like chiropractic, but a little more scientific. Also, its a small part of what they learn to do.

DO's tend to be more based in primary care specialties. Its also my observation that they tend to be more patient centered than M.D.s. Although, please don't take this as my slighting M.D.s. My wife currently sees a D.O. and I think she is a phenomenal doctor. In many ways, I'd like to switch to her, but I can't. Its hard for me to explain, but the relationship I have with my current family doctor is a longstanding relationship (20 years) and we both are extremely loyal to one another.

I hope that helps you making a decision.
Thanks, Mark! "Patient centered" is what I'm looking for. I'm assuming your wife's doctor is somewhere near Ogden. Am I right?
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Old Yesterday, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,321 posts, read 21,009,347 times
Reputation: 10016
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
One of the complaints of older doctors is that MDs now can rely too heavily on tests... they have lost the ability to do a good physical exam. DOs learn how to do this and interpret tests.
Yes! That appeals to me. Tests are great and I'm sure they provide a ton of useful information. I just don't want test results to be the only basis for my treatment. I think I'm starting to come around!
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Old Yesterday, 02:32 PM
 
5,920 posts, read 3,367,690 times
Reputation: 13809
In addition to all around good care, the great thing about DO's is that they are trained to do spinal manipulation also. Mine helped A LOT with my back problems.
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