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Old 11-25-2018, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Southeastern North Carolina
1,644 posts, read 3,142,234 times
Reputation: 2883

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukiyo-e View Post
I wonder if the OP misunderstood that it's the lens is removed, so the clear replacement can be inserted? I have several friends and relatives who have had surgery for everything from detached retinas to cataract surgery to refractive surgery, and no one has ever had an eyeball removed. The only time I can imagine removing the entire eye is when there is a medical reason like a tumor, which would result in losing the eye entirely.
Either that or the post is a joke. It's hard to believe that any adult in the 21st century could actually believe that your eyeball is removed for cataract surgery.
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Old 11-25-2018, 11:20 AM
Status: "If it ain't broke, update it until it is." (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Houston, TX
13,471 posts, read 7,595,944 times
Reputation: 27686
Quote:
Originally Posted by sasie123 View Post
My primary-care physician recommended me to see an Ophthalmologist because he suspected I have Cataracts. I visited the Ophthalmologist who stated I need eye surgery for their removal. I asked if she uses a LASER , and she stated, " NO." Then I asked her to explain to me the procedure the medical facility, which has multitude of locations, uses.

She stated that the ball of the eye is removed, a small cut is made in the front, of the ball, and the cataracts removed, then the ball of the eye is replaced into the socket. That did not sound too good to me, so when I got home, I asked my husband, who it had done it several -years -ago, if he remembers the method she had used then, and he stated that it was done via LASER. We spoke back and -forth, and I told him that the procedure has changed now.

Last night, while trying to go to sleep, I began weighing down the procedure the Specialist spoke about, versus the one that she is doing now, and I do not feel comfortable with the present one.

In a three-page-letter that is to be signed prior to the surgery, it states that "SOMETIMES, the eye ball may not ALIGN well into the socket AND that there is also the possibility that one of the two eyes maybe slightly MALALIGNED. " That was the end for me.........I am planning on forgetting it, and find a doctor who uses LASER. The Medical facility that she works for, has recently changed ownership, and I believe the present procedure is less expensive, and brings in the most money....

Any opinions? Thank you,
Both of you are wrong. No, your eyeball is never removed from the socket in cataract surgery. And no, cataract surgery is not done via laser, at least not completely. The laser can assist the surgeon in breaking the cataract into pieces. But the surgeon has to make a tiny incision in order to suck the cataract up with a tiny vacuum. Then he/she implants a folding man-made lens into the hole that unfolds into the chamber where the natural lens used to be. The incision heals on its own without stitches. Some surgeons use the laser to break up the cataract, others don't. It is extremely successful either way; the most successful surgery performed in the US. If you don't have it done, your vision will grow dimmer and dimmer. Most patients are amazed at the improvement in their vision following surgery. They didn't realize how bad their vision had become because the decline is quite gradual.

As for the consent form, it is a list of all possible complications. As with many surgeries, complications are rare. The most common are bleeding, pain, tearing, and infection. I am an ophthalmic technician and have assisted in a few hundred cataract surgeries. I can count on one hand the number of surgeries that had serious complications. It is your decision of course, but if you don't have the surgery done, your vision will become so cloudy and blurry you will be essentially blind, even with glasses.
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Old 11-25-2018, 07:07 PM
 
889 posts, read 353,188 times
Reputation: 902
Default Not Sure Of What I Will Do Yet......

I am having great difficulty trying to come to a decision. The surgery is scheduled for 12/05. And the more I read about making a slit on the Cornea, and looking at all those tools inserted into it, the more apprehensive about it, I get. Specially, since I have to go back for the second eye. My surgeon found that I have an astigmatism, so there is more probing into the eye to fix it. I think my greatest fear comes from thinking what if: What if the surgeon is in a bad mood, has a fight with his significant other, or any other
personal issue, and there are eye complications.....I can see now........will I be able to see tomorrow.....?

Regardless of my decision, I want to thank all of you for taking the time and helping me. Some people I was not able to rep, because C/D will not let me. But I want all of you to know, that I have greatly appreciated all of your help. God Bless you all.....
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Old 11-25-2018, 07:54 PM
 
7,922 posts, read 5,530,023 times
Reputation: 14780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
And I bet you'll be happy with the results. But removing the eyeball from the socket for the surgery???? Naaaaaah.....

I'm imagining disclaimers for "googly eyes" results from each eye looking in different directions after they've been put back into the socket. There may be some reasons for CYA disclaimers, but I'm sure they mean something else.
As long as they go back in the correct socket, I'm happy!

It would be hard to retrain for shooting competitions (Glock Sport Shooting Foundation) with my right eye
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Old 11-25-2018, 07:57 PM
 
5,009 posts, read 7,817,489 times
Reputation: 2966
Quote:
Originally Posted by sasie123 View Post
I am having great difficulty trying to come to a decision. The surgery is scheduled for 12/05. And the more I read about making a slit on the Cornea, and looking at all those tools inserted into it, the more apprehensive about it, I get. Specially, since I have to go back for the second eye. My surgeon found that I have an astigmatism, so there is more probing into the eye to fix it. I think my greatest fear comes from thinking what if: What if the surgeon is in a bad mood, has a fight with his significant other, or any other
personal issue, and there are eye complications.....I can see now........will I be able to see tomorrow.....?

Regardless of my decision, I want to thank all of you for taking the time and helping me. Some people I was not able to rep, because C/D will not let me. But I want all of you to know, that I have greatly appreciated all of your help. God Bless you all.....
Sasie, I understand your apprehension. I was hassled by the same thing. The reason for that is because if you've never undergone such an experience, then that experience is completely unknown you. Our imagination takes over to try to fill in those unknown gaps. We can imagine frightening things could happen.

I was nervous to perhaps a half-hour before being take in to the surgical suite. The chair I sat in was sort of like a comfortable living room lazy-boy chair. What I did was request sedation. I was given something to calm my nerves. I was aware and assisted into the surgical suite (or living room). Once the sedation is administered, it's night-night. You might be asked to count backwards from 10. When I got to 7, I couldn't remember if I said that number or not. Then the next thing I remembered was being asked if I could get up out of the chair. That was after the sedation was turned off. In reality, I was aware enough to respond if to move a bit, if that were necessary, except I wouldn't remember anything about it later.

I didn't want to see or know anything about what was happening. Only after it's all done, the sedation is stopped, and I was back to the world again as though nothing had happened, except for an eye-patch and a bit of very mild grogginess which quickly wore off.

There was no pain, although later at home, it did seem to ache slightly for a bit. Tylenol took care of that. I already had the eye-drops (that I bought a few days earlier from a pharmacy) at home to begin using according to the written schedule, so I didn't have to fuss about that. The eye-drops are prescription meds.

When it's all over and you're back home, you might find yourself wondering what the fuss was all about. Since you're getting much closer to the appointment date, if you think you'd prefer sedation, you should ask very quickly so it can be arranged. It's a good idea to also ask for the prescription eye-drops in case you want to get them before your appointment. Otherwise, you may be given them as you leave the office and have to have someone take them and and pick them up for you. All in all, there is nothing to worry about. If you're nervous while your in the patient waiting room, say so, and they'll give you something to make you feel warm, a bit drowsy, and much more relaxed.

Honestly, there is nothing to worry about. When you can remove the eye-patch, you'll feel much better and impressed at how things look. It will be alright.
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Old 11-25-2018, 08:02 PM
 
7,922 posts, read 5,530,023 times
Reputation: 14780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
Both of you are wrong. No, your eyeball is never removed from the socket in cataract surgery. And no, cataract surgery is not done via laser, at least not completely. The laser can assist the surgeon in breaking the cataract into pieces. But the surgeon has to make a tiny incision in order to suck the cataract up with a tiny vacuum. Then he/she implants a folding man-made lens into the hole that unfolds into the chamber where the natural lens used to be. The incision heals on its own without stitches. Some surgeons use the laser to break up the cataract, others don't. It is extremely successful either way; the most successful surgery performed in the US. If you don't have it done, your vision will grow dimmer and dimmer. Most patients are amazed at the improvement in their vision following surgery. They didn't realize how bad their vision had become because the decline is quite gradual.

As for the consent form, it is a list of all possible complications. As with many surgeries, complications are rare. The most common are bleeding, pain, tearing, and infection. I am an ophthalmic technician and have assisted in a few hundred cataract surgeries. I can count on one hand the number of surgeries that had serious complications. It is your decision of course, but if you don't have the surgery done, your vision will become so cloudy and blurry you will be essentially blind, even with glasses.
Yeppers!
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Old 11-25-2018, 09:36 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,266 posts, read 6,453,941 times
Reputation: 12962
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
As long as they go back in the correct socket, I'm happy!

It would be hard to retrain for shooting competitions (Glock Sport Shooting Foundation) with my right eye
LOL, I bet! It'd be hard to tell where you're looking.
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Old 11-25-2018, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Australia
402 posts, read 137,056 times
Reputation: 791
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
OP: I was told about 20 yrs ago I had cataracts forming, cloudy eyes and I was probably 60, I did nothing, and got to work and did my research and saving myself from cataract surgery with the eye supports I'm using, and I 'm now 80.

My neighbor is into a year with a botched surgery from Kaiser with her one eye. Long story and I know, I know many are successful, but if one can avoid them why not is my opinion. With any surgery there is always risk.

I'll send you more privately, but also believe strongly in wearing Sunglasses in sun or bright days even no sun.

I have posts in Alt Med on what I do for my eyes if you want to look over there.
Each to their own but I have had both my eyes done this year and the results are wonderful.

It is the best $800 I have ever spent. I was increasingly hating driving as the cataracts got worse and I have really regained my confidence on the road. I had one eye fixed for distance and the other for mid distance. I can read most things without glasses and just use cheap $5 glasses if I am reading small print at night.

The procedure itself was very straightforward. I recall most of it and I could not drive for 24 hours nor swim for three weeks after each procedure. It did not hurt, was not frightening and I am immensely grateful for modern medicine.
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Old 11-25-2018, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Southern California
19,590 posts, read 6,493,281 times
Reputation: 13187
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Each to their own but I have had both my eyes done this year and the results are wonderful.

It is the best $800 I have ever spent. I was increasingly hating driving as the cataracts got worse and I have really regained my confidence on the road. I had one eye fixed for distance and the other for mid distance. I can read most things without glasses and just use cheap $5 glasses if I am reading small print at night.

The procedure itself was very straightforward. I recall most of it and I could not drive for 24 hours nor swim for three weeks after each procedure. It did not hurt, was not frightening and I am immensely grateful for modern medicine.
That's good and glad your procedure turned out good. My neighbor is into about a year post op with a botched cataract surgery and I'm sure she's not alone in the world, There is a group in the world who are not quick to do surgery of any kind and work to prevent them and those who do not hesitate.

There is risk with all surgeries. I live with complications from 2 surgeries in my life and not quick to do any more. So I work with prevention and have been for over 25 yrs.

Last edited by jaminhealth; 11-25-2018 at 10:54 PM..
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Old 11-25-2018, 10:38 PM
 
33,280 posts, read 39,504,102 times
Reputation: 28670
Quote:
Originally Posted by sasie123 View Post
I am having great difficulty trying to come to a decision. The surgery is scheduled for 12/05. And the more I read about making a slit on the Cornea, and looking at all those tools inserted into it, the more apprehensive about it, I get. Specially, since I have to go back for the second eye. My surgeon found that I have an astigmatism, so there is more probing into the eye to fix it. I think my greatest fear comes from thinking what if: What if the surgeon is in a bad mood, has a fight with his significant other, or any other
personal issue, and there are eye complications.....I can see now........will I be able to see tomorrow.....?

Regardless of my decision, I want to thank all of you for taking the time and helping me. Some people I was not able to rep, because C/D will not let me. But I want all of you to know, that I have greatly appreciated all of your help. God Bless you all.....
I too was extremely anxious before my cataract surgery however it proved to be wasted anxiety as the operation went smoothly,i saw nothing as while its happening a very bright light is shone in your eye and i felt nothing as a pre op they put many drops of freezing solution in the eye ending with a freezing gel, operation took 10 minutes and was basically a nothing burger.
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