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Old 12-04-2018, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Southern California
19,599 posts, read 6,493,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
Pardon my French, but what the bloody hell does hips and arthritic joints have to do with cataracts?????
I beg your pardon, I was reply to #36 above. Thanks.
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Old 12-04-2018, 11:05 PM
 
7,925 posts, read 5,530,023 times
Reputation: 14785
Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
It's pretty surprising. I found myself looking at all sort of things just to see the richness and brightness of different colors. Almost like seeing things for the first time. Green leaves on trees looked a lot greener than before. Things really seem to stand out for a while.
The difference between my two eyes is amazing. MrsM's white scarf is bright white with my operative eye and dull yellow with the other one. Can't wait for the few week wait to be over and get the other eye cut.
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Old Yesterday, 09:22 AM
 
5,009 posts, read 7,817,489 times
Reputation: 2966
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
The difference between my two eyes is amazing. MrsM's white scarf is bright white with my operative eye and dull yellow with the other one. Can't wait for the few week wait to be over and get the other eye cut.
I had to wait for around 9 months before I could have the cataract removed from my other eye. It was there, but apparently not to the scale that's used to satisfy insurance companies. The object was to try to remove the entire cataract after it had thickened a bit more. Otherwise there'd be the risk of leaving tiny amounts behind in the "soup" which could reform the cataract again. Better to be sure it can all be removed entirely through the tiniest incision of a single procedure. With a tiny incision, a soft lens can be inserted and without the need for sutures. Harder lenses sometimes require a larger incision that requires some stitching. Same thing might apply to removing cataracts that are too firm which could potentially clog up the suction tube.

Like you mentioned, the visual difference is very striking. To me, things looked like they had a dull brownish tinge to it. Reminded me of trying to look through a very dusty screen. I could see things, but they weren't as clear. Other things, like the text in this thread, were difficult to make out. When I first noticed it, I thought there was a smudge on the windshield of my car. When I got home, I looked for it and found nothing. Then I thought it might be a problem with my glasses. I had them examined, and they were fine as well. It was recommended to see my eye doctor, which I did, and which then determined the problem was cataracts.

I wanted to have both eyes done at the same time. But one eye was not as severe as the other, so I had to wait longer to have the other eye done. In the end, I was very pleased to have both eyes see things clearly again. It's amazing how we can take our eyesight for granted. It's also remarkable how the formation of cataracts can gradually creep up on you.

Best wishes to you on the restoration of your other eye in the near future.
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Old Yesterday, 02:24 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,266 posts, read 6,453,941 times
Reputation: 12962
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Well, I continue to use eye supports and no cataracts at 80 and hip replacement was a great disappointment at 72. All in all my well being is good, except for the surgery and arthritic joints. There are many stories out there.

My neighbor still is walking around a year later with a messed up cataract surgery and fighting with Kaiser for help.
And I have many neighbors, friends and acquintances who are walking around with clear vision, and thank G-d every day for having so successfully undergone cataract surgery. I myself am among that group.

I also have a number of friends, neighbors and acquaintenances who are walking around much better, able to resume activities they thought were gone to them forever, and living with much less pain ( or no pain in some cases) thanks to their successful hip or knee surgery, and they thank G-d every day they had that surgery.

Once again, we make our own choices, weigh the risks vs. benefits of medical treatment/procedures intended to correct or at least improve conditions or illnesses we find ourselves suffering, and no one is telling you that you should make choices other than you have in regards to your health.

But your insistence in interjecting your anecdotal "bad outcome" or failure stories into virtually every thread in the medical/health forums, no matter the subject, won't do much to convince others that anything associated with mainstream medicine is necessarily a dismal failure. They know better, and many have their own anecdotal experiences to prove it.
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Old Yesterday, 02:27 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,266 posts, read 6,453,941 times
Reputation: 12962
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
The difference between my two eyes is amazing. MrsM's white scarf is bright white with my operative eye and dull yellow with the other one. Can't wait for the few week wait to be over and get the other eye cut.
Glad to hear it went so well.! Your vision will get even better as your eye begins to heal.
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Old Yesterday, 02:44 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,266 posts, read 6,453,941 times
Reputation: 12962
Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
I had to wait for around 9 months before I could have the cataract removed from my other eye. It was there, but apparently not to the scale that's used to satisfy insurance companies. The object was to try to remove the entire cataract after it had thickened a bit more. Otherwise there'd be the risk of leaving tiny amounts behind in the "soup" which could reform the cataract again. Better to be sure it can all be removed entirely through the tiniest incision of a single procedure. With a tiny incision, a soft lens can be inserted and without the need for sutures. Harder lenses sometimes require a larger incision that requires some stitching. Same thing might apply to removing cataracts that are too firm which could potentially clog up the suction tube.

Like you mentioned, the visual difference is very striking. To me, things looked like they had a dull brownish tinge to it. Reminded me of trying to look through a very dusty screen. I could see things, but they weren't as clear. Other things, like the text in this thread, were difficult to make out. When I first noticed it, I thought there was a smudge on the windshield of my car. When I got home, I looked for it and found nothing. Then I thought it might be a problem with my glasses. I had them examined, and they were fine as well. It was recommended to see my eye doctor, which I did, and which then determined the problem was cataracts.

I wanted to have both eyes done at the same time. But one eye was not as severe as the other, so I had to wait longer to have the other eye done. In the end, I was very pleased to have both eyes see things clearly again. It's amazing how we can take our eyesight for granted. It's also remarkable how the formation of cataracts can gradually creep up on you.

Best wishes to you on the restoration of your other eye in the near future.
I think the criteria for cataract surgery is to do it when the vision loss cannot be corrected by glasses or contact lenses, although I'm sure you're likely right about a "mature" cataract being easier to take out in its entirety than one that's smaller and softer. As I understand it nearly everyone develops cataracts as they age, but for many people, these never become big enough and don't affect the sight enough to require surgery. That has been the case for my husband, at least so far.

As I also understand it, opthalmologists are reluctant to do cataract surgery on both eyes at one time, unless there is a compelling reason to fo do. As they told me ( I wasn't interested in having both done at one time, but just asked out of curiosity), in the event something adverse happened with the surgery, the patient could be in a pretty bad way if it affected both eyes.

It sounds, though, in your case they have not scheduled the second eye because that cataract isn't big enough to affect your sight enough to require surgery. I have a friend that also had surgery in one eye, but does not need it in her other eye. Right now she has no plans for cataract surgery in that eye.
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Old Yesterday, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Southern California
19,599 posts, read 6,493,281 times
Reputation: 13200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
And I have many neighbors, friends and acquintances who are walking around with clear vision, and thank G-d every day for having so successfully undergone cataract surgery. I myself am among that group.

I also have a number of friends, neighbors and acquaintenances who are walking around much better, able to resume activities they thought were gone to them forever, and living with much less pain ( or no pain in some cases) thanks to their successful hip or knee surgery, and they thank G-d every day they had that surgery.

Once again, we make our own choices, weigh the risks vs. benefits of medical treatment/procedures intended to correct or at least improve conditions or illnesses we find ourselves suffering, and no one is telling you that you should make choices other than you have in regards to your health.

But your insistence in interjecting your anecdotal "bad outcome" or failure stories into virtually every thread in the medical/health forums, no matter the subject, won't do much to convince others that anything associated with mainstream medicine is necessarily a dismal failure. They know better, and many have their own anecdotal experiences to prove it.
Of course, but I'll take working on prevention any day. I'm not the only one in the world who thinks as I do..good grief. Many of us are not in love with pharma and surgeries. Emergencies, of course.

I know what I've been doing is keeping my colors bright and vivid and no surgery to get this way at 80 yrs on this earth.

And we in prevention are looked at here as strange or whatever because of how we take care of our health. Amazing.

Last edited by jaminhealth; Yesterday at 03:00 PM..
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Old Today, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Australia
404 posts, read 137,056 times
Reputation: 791
Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
I had to wait for around 9 months before I could have the cataract removed from my other eye. It was there, but apparently not to the scale that's used to satisfy insurance companies. The object was to try to remove the entire cataract after it had thickened a bit more. Otherwise there'd be the risk of leaving tiny amounts behind in the "soup" which could reform the cataract again. Better to be sure it can all be removed entirely through the tiniest incision of a single procedure. With a tiny incision, a soft lens can be inserted and without the need for sutures. Harder lenses sometimes require a larger incision that requires some stitching. Same thing might apply to removing cataracts that are too firm which could potentially clog up the suction tube.

Like you mentioned, the visual difference is very striking. To me, things looked like they had a dull brownish tinge to it. Reminded me of trying to look through a very dusty screen. I could see things, but they weren't as clear. Other things, like the text in this thread, were difficult to make out. When I first noticed it, I thought there was a smudge on the windshield of my car. When I got home, I looked for it and found nothing. Then I thought it might be a problem with my glasses. I had them examined, and they were fine as well. It was recommended to see my eye doctor, which I did, and which then determined the problem was cataracts.

I wanted to have both eyes done at the same time. But one eye was not as severe as the other, so I had to wait longer to have the other eye done. In the end, I was very pleased to have both eyes see things clearly again. It's amazing how we can take our eyesight for granted. It's also remarkable how the formation of cataracts can gradually creep up on you.

Best wishes to you on the restoration of your other eye in the near future.
Your second paragraph reminds me of my experience with new bifocals. I had decided to get the first cataract done about last February as it was a convenient time for me. I lost my glasses and deliberately got fairly cheap ones as I would only use them for a short time. So I would clean them continually, as well as the car windscreen, as both seemed to be always dirty. Got cranky with myself for buying those cheapish glasses. When I went to see the specialist again of course he told me it was my cataracts, not the glasses, that were the problem.

Fortunately our private health insurers do not have a role in deciding anything much about our healthcare. It is up to the doctor and the insurers reimburse a set amount, though often have limits. My specialist allows a minimum of a month between eyes but I ended up having about three months. Was so easy having the second, knowing exactly what to expect.
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Old Today, 12:39 AM
 
5,009 posts, read 7,817,489 times
Reputation: 2966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
I think the criteria for cataract surgery is to do it when the vision loss cannot be corrected by glasses or contact lenses, although I'm sure you're likely right about a "mature" cataract being easier to take out in its entirety than one that's smaller and softer. As I understand it nearly everyone develops cataracts as they age, but for many people, these never become big enough and don't affect the sight enough to require surgery. That has been the case for my husband, at least so far.

As I also understand it, opthalmologists are reluctant to do cataract surgery on both eyes at one time, unless there is a compelling reason to fo do. As they told me ( I wasn't interested in having both done at one time, but just asked out of curiosity), in the event something adverse happened with the surgery, the patient could be in a pretty bad way if it affected both eyes.

It sounds, though, in your case they have not scheduled the second eye because that cataract isn't big enough to affect your sight enough to require surgery. I have a friend that also had surgery in one eye, but does not need it in her other eye. Right now she has no plans for cataract surgery in that eye.
I wasn't exactly thinking of both being done the same day. Like you, I had also asked out of curiosity. I agree that if there is some other major medical issue to do so at the same time, then there might not be any other choice.

I did have the other cataract removed, but it was a matter of waiting for several months between. The reason was that cataract in one eye was worse than the other. It was explained to me that although it's possible to remove the remaining cataract, the health insurance would likely turn it down. If the cataract, although visible using equipment, trying to remove it as an early stage could miss some of the cataract material and allow for the cataract to reform again. There is a set of measuring standards that health insurance companies use. It may vary slightly from company to company. As such, the doctor(s) felt there was no point submitting for reimbursement until the cataract became more like the first one that was removed, that is to say when the cataract reached the point that it would be considered more intact and safer for removal. It's better not to have to go in any more times than necessary. Once the cataract has been removed and an artificial lens inserted, there should be no need to have to go back.
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Old Today, 07:28 AM
 
606 posts, read 288,745 times
Reputation: 2174
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Well, I continue to use eye supports and no cataracts at 80 and hip replacement was a great disappointment at 72.
And how, pray tell, do you know you don't have cataracts if you haven't had an eye exam in 7 years??? Your statement is laughable and cannot be supported with any credible evidence.
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