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Old 11-26-2018, 07:53 PM
 
807 posts, read 631,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LesLucid View Post
....how many of you, at this age, have a regular exercise routine? I used to bike, run, 17 years of martial arts, some lifting, now, I have to admit that I hate strenuous physical activity. Itís tiring and exercises donít feel good, either before or after like they used to.

For those of you at this age, what kind of routine, if any, do you have? Are you successful sticking to it? Do you enjoy any aspect of it? Do you feel like youíre progressing or just maintaining status quo?
There was just a segment on today's Today Show that talked about this. If folks our age have worked out all of our lives and are still able to work out several hours a week (I can't remember how many), that we could retain the muscle of a 20-something year old.

I think "20-something" is a stretch for a 70-something person but shaving years off heart and other issues because we work out is believable.

I was raised on dairy farm where there was no shortage of "muscle work". I worked out with weights up thru my fifties. I have had horses my entire life, so that means taking of them and cleaning stalls on a daily basis.

I still have two horses, still muck my own stalls and dump the manure. While I can't do the formal hoof trimming anymore, I can still get a hoof up on the hoof stand and file it down, between formal trims if I have to.

I still ride the 4-wheeler as good as I did when I was 20. I still share in bush hogging the pasture. I can no longer stay on the tractor "dawn to dusk" but a six hour day of bush hogging is still a good day for me.

While sitting on a farm tractor cutting pasture might sound like a piece of cake, we don't have a cab with heat and AC. It still takes stamina and endurance to stay out there in the heat and stay focused.

While I don't use gym equipment anymore, IMO one can't beat real farm work to exercise every muscle every day. Then try to eat right and hope for the best where the gene pool is concerned
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Old Yesterday, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,403 posts, read 10,740,091 times
Reputation: 9606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Normashirley View Post
There was just a segment on today's Today Show that talked about this. If folks our age have worked out all of our lives and are still able to work out several hours a week (I can't remember how many), that we could retain the muscle of a 20-something year old.

I think "20-something" is a stretch for a 70-something person but shaving years off heart and other issues because we work out is believable.

I was raised on dairy farm where there was no shortage of "muscle work". I worked out with weights up thru my fifties. I have had horses my entire life, so that means taking of them and cleaning stalls on a daily basis.

I still have two horses, still muck my own stalls and dump the manure. While I can't do the formal hoof trimming anymore, I can still get a hoof up on the hoof stand and file it down, between formal trims if I have to.

I still ride the 4-wheeler as good as I did when I was 20. I still share in bush hogging the pasture. I can no longer stay on the tractor "dawn to dusk" but a six hour day of bush hogging is still a good day for me.

While sitting on a farm tractor cutting pasture might sound like a piece of cake, we don't have a cab with heat and AC. It still takes stamina and endurance to stay out there in the heat and stay focused.

While I don't use gym equipment anymore, IMO one can't beat real farm work to exercise every muscle every day. Then try to eat right and hope for the best where the gene pool is concerned
You have very valid points about farm work keeping you in shape. Your diet is also probably more natural that what people in the city eat. I'm surprised that they don't make a large Roomba for your horse stalls by this time!

I worked for a company and took care of about 75 horses many years ago and it is hard work. It can also be dangerous like many of the farm duties. That is where all of us 70 year old's and older have to be very careful. Our bones are not as flexible as they were when we were in our 20s. One hard fall off a ladder or even a farm tractor could be our last hurrah. To complicate the issues some of us can experience vertigo or other issues with balance and many of us think we are so much smarter than we were when we were young. I just Googled the question and this is the answer they gave: "Falls are the leading cause of death from injury among people 65 and older, and the risk of falls increases proportionately with age. At 80 years, over half of seniors fall annually. Here are some more surprising facts and statistics related to falling: 87 percent of all fractures in the elderly are due to falls."

I am not encouraging seniors to just give up on life and die. I just wish that all of us could be a little more careful in our older age. We have to think about what we are doing and plan appropriately (keeping our personal safety in mind).
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Old Yesterday, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,709 posts, read 80,059,664 times
Reputation: 39109
Like what Fisheye has to say: my husbands family were all raised on the farm but most decided when in their 40s to just relax and stop killing themselves with physical work. Ok, they did live to be in their 80s but for the most part just sat around doing nothing but complaining. On the other hand, hubby's mom, moved from the farm to a metro area when she got married. Because she did not drive and of course they only had one car anyway she walked everywhere. This was her only form of exercise, but it kept her going until she was 97 or just 2 months short of 97. Up until her early 90s she was as healthy physically as well as mentally as one could be. My dad's story was very similar. I think exercise in some form is very important but it doesn't have to a routine. It is up to everyone how they look at it. The most important thing about all this is: don't lecture those who choose a different routine than you and don't be too self righteous about your choice.
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Old Yesterday, 07:01 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,238 posts, read 6,430,854 times
Reputation: 12936
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
You have very valid points about farm work keeping you in shape. Your diet is also probably more natural that what people in the city eat. I'm surprised that they don't make a large Roomba for your horse stalls by this time!

I worked for a company and took care of about 75 horses many years ago and it is hard work. It can also be dangerous like many of the farm duties. That is where all of us 70 year old's and older have to be very careful. Our bones are not as flexible as they were when we were in our 20s. One hard fall off a ladder or even a farm tractor could be our last hurrah. To complicate the issues some of us can experience vertigo or other issues with balance and many of us think we are so much smarter than we were when we were young. I just Googled the question and this is the answer they gave: "Falls are the leading cause of death from injury among people 65 and older, and the risk of falls increases proportionately with age. At 80 years, over half of seniors fall annually. Here are some more surprising facts and statistics related to falling: 87 percent of all fractures in the elderly are due to falls."

I am not encouraging seniors to just give up on life and die. I just wish that all of us could be a little more careful in our older age. We have to think about what we are doing and plan appropriately (keeping our personal safety in mind).
Exactly, as it seems the sense of invincibility many of us carried with us from our much younger years takes repeated blows by the realities of advancing age.

But as I see it, and as you have so well expressed, never give up, just modify as you need to to accomplish what you want.
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Old Yesterday, 07:02 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,238 posts, read 6,430,854 times
Reputation: 12936
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Like what Fisheye has to say: my husbands family were all raised on the farm but most decided when in their 40s to just relax and stop killing themselves with physical work. Ok, they did live to be in their 80s but for the most part just sat around doing nothing but complaining. On the other hand, hubby's mom, moved from the farm to a metro area when she got married. Because she did not drive and of course they only had one car anyway she walked everywhere. This was her only form of exercise, but it kept her going until she was 97 or just 2 months short of 97. Up until her early 90s she was as healthy physically as well as mentally as one could be. My dad's story was very similar. I think exercise in some form is very important but it doesn't have to a routine. It is up to everyone how they look at it. The most important thing about all this is: don't lecture those who choose a different routine than you and don't be too self righteous about your choice.
Well said.
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Old Yesterday, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,403 posts, read 10,740,091 times
Reputation: 9606
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Like what Fisheye has to say: my husbands family were all raised on the farm but most decided when in their 40s to just relax and stop killing themselves with physical work. Ok, they did live to be in their 80s but for the most part just sat around doing nothing but complaining. On the other hand, hubby's mom, moved from the farm to a metro area when she got married. Because she did not drive and of course they only had one car anyway she walked everywhere. This was her only form of exercise, but it kept her going until she was 97 or just 2 months short of 97. Up until her early 90s she was as healthy physically as well as mentally as one could be. My dad's story was very similar. I think exercise in some form is very important but it doesn't have to a routine. It is up to everyone how they look at it. The most important thing about all this is: don't lecture those who choose a different routine than you and don't be too self righteous about your choice.
That is also great advice! We cannot see the future. There are other factors at play like genetics and 'luck'. The truth is that our end is approaching. We reached our peak in our thirties and forties and are now on the downhill rollercoaster. While I caution to be a little more cautious as we age; sometimes you don't even see it coming. My 80 year old neighbor was standing in her garage when her hip just gave out. Fortunately her granddaughter found her and she survived. But it was cold outside and had she not been found quickly it might have been the end for her.

I knew a woman that had an addition with bike riding for her health. The last time I saw her she could barely walk from all the falls. It can be hard to anticipate the pitfalls of any exercise. And, like you state, it is hard to change the direction of another's life style. If I had told the avid bike rider that she would not be able to walk from bike falls; she would never listen to me. She truly believed that she had made the best choice for a healthy lifestyle. If I tried to preach to her about this personal choice I would have made an enemy instead of a friend. There can be a fine line between advice/lecturing and preaching.
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Old Yesterday, 08:18 AM
 
27,145 posts, read 38,393,382 times
Reputation: 35171
70 here. I never had to exercise. I was always strong and healthy at around 175 - 190 lbs. and 6'-2". I'm still strong as an ox, but weigh too much.

We are starting a walking program - in our house. Our area is all hills and I have some breathing problems so hills are out. Walking in the house affords things to touch and hold if I turn into a Weeble. I need those because I also have balance problems.

So we created a "route" around the house and will be walking as many loops as comfortable. That should mean our distance will increase over time. My plan is mainly to lose weight. Last time I dropped 20 lbs my doctor took me off blood pressure medicine. Goal #1.
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Old Yesterday, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Maryland
898 posts, read 268,009 times
Reputation: 2078
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsychic View Post
Well, I am not yet 70 (69) but I get exercise regularly. Usually a long daily bike ride (on a heavy cruiser but I pump it), I also do sets of rows on a "Total Trainer" machine, many body squats and walking lunges. I also hang from a pull-up bar and also do knee raises on it. I like to dance also but don't do this as much as I once did. This is my regular routine. I definitely cannot work in the yard like I used to - many back problems and old injuries have slowed me down in that department.
How many squats do you do on average per day, per week? I just added them to my regimen....donít enjoy them either.
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Old Yesterday, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,709 posts, read 80,059,664 times
Reputation: 39109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
70 here. I never had to exercise. I was always strong and healthy at around 175 - 190 lbs. and 6'-2". I'm still strong as an ox, but weigh too much.

We are starting a walking program - in our house. Our area is all hills and I have some breathing problems so hills are out. Walking in the house affords things to touch and hold if I turn into a Weeble. I need those because I also have balance problems.

So we created a "route" around the house and will be walking as many loops as comfortable. That should mean our distance will increase over time. My plan is mainly to lose weight. Last time I dropped 20 lbs my doctor took me off blood pressure medicine. Goal #1.
walking in the house is a great form of exercise and in the winter it is a lot warmer. We also, for awhile when our community indoor pool was being renovated did walking at WalMart. The problem there, I always remember something I thought I had to have.
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Old Yesterday, 03:17 PM
 
609 posts, read 152,222 times
Reputation: 1100
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
You have very valid points about farm work keeping you in shape. Your diet is also probably more natural that what people in the city eat. I'm surprised that they don't make a large Roomba for your horse stalls by this time!

I worked for a company and took care of about 75 horses many years ago and it is hard work. It can also be dangerous like many of the farm duties. That is where all of us 70 year old's and older have to be very careful. Our bones are not as flexible as they were when we were in our 20s. One hard fall off a ladder or even a farm tractor could be our last hurrah. To complicate the issues some of us can experience vertigo or other issues with balance and many of us think we are so much smarter than we were when we were young. I just Googled the question and this is the answer they gave: "Falls are the leading cause of death from injury among people 65 and older, and the risk of falls increases proportionately with age. At 80 years, over half of seniors fall annually. Here are some more surprising facts and statistics related to falling: 87 percent of all fractures in the elderly are due to falls."

I am not encouraging seniors to just give up on life and die. I just wish that all of us could be a little more careful in our older age. We have to think about what we are doing and plan appropriately (keeping our personal safety in mind).
Ah, Im not going to worry about it. Im 70 and still ride. And I have an obnoxious mare who has a different opinion than mine at times. I have friends that are 80 and still ride. Yes we could fall off and break a hip. Life is full of risks. Im not sitting in my rocking chair just because something might happen. Get out there and live your life. And stop worrying!
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